13 results for Gregory, Nuala, Creative work

  • Rare Form

    Pritchard, E; Mullins, K; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curators, artist Rare Form brings together a group of artists who work in sculpture, paint, print and assemblage, all of whom pull apart the method and order of art-making. Some works are comprised of many parts while others record a series of actions, and the means of generation or construction is often evident in the finished works. The object, the illusion, the form and the frame are subverted, giving the works a sense of playful intoxication; both the artists and their creations are in rare form.

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  • THE IMAGE AS NOT a celebration of ambiguity and negation

    Baatz, U; Crone, D; Donnelly, M; Dowling, J; Gregory, Nuala; Heron, W; Hill, T; Hooghiemstra, T; Schneider, J

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curator ‘THE IMAGE AS NOT’, is a show dedicated to a celebration of ambiguity and negation, and features the following artists: Uta Baatz, David Crone, Mickey Donnelly, John Dowling, Nuala Gregory, Willie Heron, Tony Hill, Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, Jurgen Schneider.

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  • Dinnseanchas - From New Delhi to the Fountain of the Clouded Sky

    Gregory, NA; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This three-person exhibition was curated by Nuala Gregory (and included her own collages that were collaborations with artists Sarah Treadwell, John Pusateri and Mandy Bonnell). The other two invited artists were Diane Henshaw and Deirdre Mackel. The exhibition consisted of a series of artworks of varying scale, in mixed media on paper, including lithography, gouache paintings, charcoal drawings, and all with elements of collage. The works were arranged to form a themed installation featuring new bodies of work produced in response to the theme of dinnseanchas or ‘poetry of place’. Drawing upon their experiences of very different environments (Auckland, Mayo, Belfast), the artists sought to define a set of relations to place that goes beyond the familiar and the functional. Instead, they attempted to recover a poetic or imagistic way of navigating public and private space, in a co-creation of the lived environment that has roots deep in ancient Irish culture. A modern Irish-English dictionary translates the word dinnseanchas as ‘topography’ (the science of place), but its etymology is quite revealing. The term originally referred to an ancient genre of mythological geography that gave a poetic account of place names. Dinn means place (an eminent site or locale); sean means old, and is strongly associated with the figure of the seanchaí or local storyteller, the keeper of lore and memory; and cas means to twist, as in the twisting of an ankle, but also of a rope. Poetically, the word suggests the twisting together of strands of collective memory of place. Perhaps forming a single narrative core, or (in a more visual idiom) a tapestry weaving together place and people, memory and experience, history and present desire. This tradition, this mnemonic and cognitive practice, was gradually extinguished in Ireland along with the native language, but has been ‘reclaimed’ in recent years particularly by the work of poets such as Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon and Ciaran Carson. In this exhibition, the artists have expressed the spirit of dinnseanchas in a modern idiom, as a ‘cognitive-imaginative mapping’ of the environment through forms of artistic engagement. Not so much by naming or storytelling, or acts of linguistic commemoration, but by marking and investing, revealing or creating new ways of seeing the landscape or cityscape – ways that can help overcome our habitual blindness, born of the pressures of time and work and commercial imperatives.

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  • Assemblages

    Mackel, D; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mackel, D., collaborator Over the past three years both artists have worked collaboratively in an installation format under the broad theme of landscapes of the past. For this exhibition, Deirdre Mackel has produced an installation entitled ‘Accidental Gardens 2’. It consists of a child-like garden made from an enclosure of miniature barbed wire fences, and toy gardening tools, including elements of Nuala Gregory’s flower works and small sculptures or ‘shelves’, assembled together allowing for the combination and interplay of ideas and materials derived from two locations. Deirdre references her remembered landscapes of growing up in West Belfast throughout the conflict and Nuala responds with objects representing those commonly found in the earth - old bottles delicately embellished with buttercups and daisies, combining them with lemon wood blocks to reference her current landscape of New Zealand. This assemblage of objects, symbolises the way things are thrown together in chaotic metropolitan space, forming accidental relations among which new possibilities might yet be glimpsed.

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  • Lisa Brady & Micky Kilfeather exhibition: New Works

    Gregory, Nuala; Smyth, J

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    These new works by Lisa Brady clearly situate themselves within the broad context of modernist abstract painting. But not without a certain irony, a conscious taking-of-distance. This reveals itself in her choice of materials and work processes, and leads to paintings that manage to appear visually self-contained (quietly at ease with themselves) whilst engaging in a subtle play of identity and the political.

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  • When will the present begin?

    Gregory, Nuala; various

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This exhibition consisted of a series of lithographs and selected objects by Nuala Gregory mixed with works by other invited artists. This unusual combination is presented in the form of an installation containing references to the history of art and to art’s place in society. Installation, perhaps pre-eminently among the art forms, captures the idea of things thrown together in the chaos and happenstance of modern life. In this case, an assembly of prints and paintings is structured around a neon sign and a chair, two tokens of the difference or the gap between art and the social. The neon sign (Bar Zacatecas) invokes the space of a public bar in Mexico in which art and leisure are strategically mixed together. People are surrounded by banks of small paintings covering the walls and suspended (most impressively) from the series of wooden rafters on the ceiling. The paintings form part of the décor of the bar, in which they are mixed with various functional but clearly aestheticised objects – mirrors, lamps, stained glass windows, bottles, wrought iron chairs – supplemented by paper decorations, skulls, puppets and dolls … As the bar fills with people, this creates a kind of living installation in which art is de-sanctified and serves as a point of spontaneous, unpredictable conversation (or discursive participation) rather than formal contemplation. The chair refers back to an event in the early history of modernist art: 0,10 (Zero-Ten). The Last Futurist Exhibition of Painting held in Petrograd, 1915. A famous photograph of Malevich’s work for the exhibition [figure 2] focuses on his Black Square, mounted high up in the ‘red corner’ so that it faces down into and across the entire space of the gallery. The red corner was the space reserved by Russian peasants for the placement of sacred icons. By his repudiation of imagery and strategic act of positioning, Malevich aimed not just at ‘the degree zero of form’ in painting but its replacement by an art of spiritual depth and genuine social utility. Almost directly below the Black Square, unremarked by art historians, was a type of ‘accidental artwork’ – a chair, probably placed there for the benefit of the person whose job it was to protect the exhibited works from damage or theft. Oddly, the chair looks as if it forms part of the installation, in which its purpose is to confront the audience with a silent challenge (who are you; and what do you make of all of this stuff on the walls?) or to invite them to ‘sit in on’ whatever the art is doing. These two references, social and historical, were brought together in the current exhibition. Each, in its way, recalls us to the social dimension of art (so often suppressed by the white cube of the gallery space) and the possible construction of communal or collective meaning. The title When Will the Present Begin? raises a simple, perhaps provocative, question about the possibility of a new time and a new role for art. For those in the former Eastern bloc, the present might be said to have begun in 1989 with the fall of the Berlin Wall – and in Belfast a few years later, with the signing of the Good Friday Agreement. Or perhaps it has still yet to begin? Can art invoke a genuinely new artistic-social space, or a new present in which art and the social are no longer set apart but merge again with ‘transformative’ effect? The exhibition aimed to resituate art somewhere between the discrete space of the gallery and the lived space of the community and the city. It mixed professional and non-professional art, and invited each of us to metaphorically take a chair and stake a place in the discussion.

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  • Now Colour, Now Shape, Now Paper

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Exploded View

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In Gallery Two, Associate Professor Nuala Gregory from the Elam School of Fine Arts creates an immersive installation of printed and collaged works. Her art work draws on her investigations in art theory, advancing the proposition that art can produce effects which escape the bounds of representation and operated instead at the level of bodily sensation. The exhibition is accompanied by a 48 page full colour catalogue with essays by Dr Peter Shand and Gregory O’Brien.

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  • Nuala Gregory - new works

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Coleccion Grafica

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Light, Water, Pigment - an active accord

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Exhibition of 9 paintings for the Second International Conference on Semiconductor Photochemistry. The exhibition was based on common materials used in photochemistry and watercolour painting, water, pigment and light.

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  • Exploded View

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In Gallery Two, Associate Professor Nuala Gregory from the Elam School of Fine Arts creates an immersive installation of printed and collaged works. Her art work draws on her investigations in art theory, advancing the proposition that art can produce effects which escape the bounds of representation and operated instead at the level of bodily sensation. The exhibition is accompanied by a 48 page full colour catalogue with essays by Dr Peter Shand and Gregory O’Brien.

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  • Any coloured thing: solo exhibition

    Gregory, Nuala (2017-09-18)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Any Coloured Thing, is an exhibition by Nuala Gregory that explores how colour and sensation can influence our understanding of objects. Gregory???s work draws on her investigations into painting, printmaking, collage and colour, advancing the proposition that art can produce effects which escape the bounds of representation and operate instead at the level of bodily sensation. In her writing she explores ideas on contemporary painting as follows: ???Post-medium and post-conceptual theories of art suggest that painting is not so much dead as posthumous, enduring an unending afterlife. Its achievement is certain but insufficiently understood, and so it lingers on (as embarrassment, enigma, or happy commodity) in the digital age. ???

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