71 results for Hinze, Annika, Conference item

  • Keeping Track of the semantic Web: Personalized Event Notification

    Hinze, Annika; Evans, Reuben James Emmanuel (2006)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The semantic web will not be a static collection of formats, data and meta-data but highly dynamic in each aspect. This paper proposes a personalized event notification system for semantic web documents (ENS-SW). The system can intelligently detect and filter changes in semantic web documents by exploiting the semantic structure of those documents. In our prototype, we combine the functionalities of user profiles and distributed authoring systems. Typically, both approaches would lack the ability to handle semantic web documents. This paper introduces the design and implementation of our event notification system for semantic web documents that handles the XML representation of RDF. We analyzed our prototype regarding accuracy and efficiency in change detection. Our system supports sophisticated change detection including partial deletion, awareness for document restructuring, and approximate filter matches.

    View record details
  • Efficient filtering of composite events

    Hinze, Annika (2003)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Event Notification Services (ENS) are used in various applications such as remote monitoring and control, stock tickers, traffic control, or facility management. The performance issues of the filtering of primitive events has been widely studied. However, for a growing number of applications, the rapid notification about the occurrence of composite events is an important issue. Currently, the detection of composite events requires a second filtering step after the identification of the primitive components. In this paper, we propose a single-step method for the filtering of composite events. The method has been implemented and tested within our ENS prototype CompAS. Using our method, the filter response time for composite events is significantly reduced. Additionally, the overall performance of the event filtering has been improved.

    View record details
  • Alerting in a Digital Library environment - Do Channels meet the requirements?

    Faensen, Daniel; Hinze, Annika; Schweppe, Heinz (1998)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    An Alerting Service (AS) informs its clients about new information provided by several suppliers. Special interests of clients can be defined as profiles. In the context of digital libraries, suppliers are the providers of documents. Providers are typically scientific publishers. In this paper we assume, that the providers are known to the clients. A general model and architecture of an Alerting Service is given in [1]. Channel technology has been developed for broadcast of news and continous streams of data like stock rates. For the digital library enviroment a finer granularity in profile definition than for common broadcasting is needed. In contrast to broadcast services, publishing events of multiple providers have to be presented to each client in a uniform way. In this summary we evaluate how the two competing approaches of Channel technology, Netscape’s Netcaster [3] and Microsofts Active Channels [2] meet these requirements. To satisfy user’s needs events have to be filtered by more or less complex profiles, e. g. a set of documents (like journals), a list of keywords (selected arbitraryly or from a thesaurus) or a query in a full-fledged query language like STARTS [4]. An easy-to-use and powerful profile definition language is one requirement for an AS. The second is a unified view, that means splitting the n:m-relationship between providers and clients. The use of both technologies strongly depends on how the contents is to be filtered, i.e. how the user profile is to be defined.

    View record details
  • Using ontologies to reason about the usability of interactive medical devices in multiple situations of use

    Bowen, Judy; Hinze, Annika (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Formally modelling interactive software systems and devices allows us to prove properties of correctness about such devices, and thus ensure effectiveness of their use. It also enables us to consider interaction properties such as usability and consistency between the interface and system functionality. Interactive modal devices, that have a fixed interface but whose behaviour is dependent on the mode of the device, can be similarly modelled. Such devices always behave in the same way (i.e. have the same functionality and interaction possibilities) irrespective of how, or where, they are used. However, a user’s interaction with such devices may vary according to the physical location or environment in which they are situated (we refer to this as a system’s context and usage situation). In this paper we look at a particular example of a safety-critical system, that of a modal interactive medical syringe pump, which is used in multiple situations. We consider how ontologies can be used to reason about the effects of different situations on the use of such devices.

    View record details
  • Using physical clocks for replication in MANETs

    Scholz, Manuel; Bregulla, Frank; Hinze, Annika (2007)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    When update-anywhere data replication is performed in a MANET, operations on replicated data are often executed concurrently. To achieve a global total ordering of all operations, we propose a hybrid timestamp mechanism that combines physical clocks and logical timestamps. Our approach overcomes the ordering problem that arises from imprecisely synchronized physical clocks. We overlay the timestamps of operations with a grid of time-slots. To order the operations, we use physical clocks for operations in different time-slots and logical clocks for operations within the same time-slot. We prove that our method guarantees a total ordering when using an appropriate grid width.

    View record details
  • Anonymous mobile service collaboration: Quality of service

    Hinze, Annika; Rinck, Michael; Streader, David (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Mobile services depend on user context and preferences, and a mobile user’s context is constantly changing. Many services are only available locally. The most appropriate service for a user’s context is not known in advance and a user may enter or leave a service’s range at any time. For a seamless user experience, services need to collaborate. These complex collaborations should be instantaneous yet anonymous – without disclosing user information. The paper proposes a new service collaboration model using event-based interaction. A prototypical implementation is used to demonstrate functionality, inter-operability, and generality of our solution. The solution guarantees ad-hoc service collaboration while protecting user information.

    View record details
  • Contextual queries express mobile information needs

    Hinze, Annika; Chang, Carole; Nichols, David M. (2010)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The users of mobile devices increasingly use networked services to address their information needs. Questions asked by mobile users are strongly influenced by contextual factors such as location, conversation and activity. We report on a diary study performed to better understand mobile information needs. We find that the type of questions recorded by participants varies across their locations, with differences between home, shopping and in-car contexts. These variations occur both in the query terms and in the form of desired answers. Both the location of queries and the participants' activities affected participants' questions. When information needs were affected by both location and activity, they tended to be strongly affected by both factors. The overall picture that emerges is one of multiple contextual influences interacting to shape mobile information needs. Mobile devices that attempt to adapt to users' context will need to account for a rich variety of situational factors.

    View record details
  • Tracking and re-finding printed material using a personal digital library

    Hinze, Annika; Dighe, Amay (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Most web searches aim to re-find previously known information or documents. Keeping track of one’s digital and printed reading material is known to be a challenging and costly task. We describe the design, implementation and evaluation of our Human-centred workplace (HCW) – a system that supports the tracking of physical document printouts. HCW embeds QR codes in the document printout, stores the documents in a personal Digital Library, and uses cameras in the office to track changes in the document locations. We explored the HCW in three evaluations, using the system over several weeks in an office setting, a user study in a lab environment, and extensive functional tests.

    View record details
  • Designing a mobile augmented memory system for people with traumatic brain injuries

    Chang, Carole; Hinze, Annika; Bowen, Judy; Starkey, Nicola J. (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Augmented memory systems help people remember events in their lives. Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) often have memory impairments. We conducted a user study to learn about strategies individuals with TBI use to remember events in their lives. We explored what characteristics individuals with TBI expect of an augmented memory system. We then investigated these aspects in an initial mobile app design, and propose here a concept for a rehearsal application that addresses the issues found in our studies.

    View record details
  • Supporting gender-neutral digital library creation: a case study using the GenderMag toolkit

    Cunningham, Sally Jo; Hinze, Annika; Nichols, David M. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Software is assumed by its creators and maintainers to be gender-neutral: that is, that it is equally well suited for use by any user, regardless of gender. We investigate this assumption in the digital libraries context through analysis of a significant digital library construction and maintenance tool—the Greenstone Digital Librarian Interface (GLI)—using the GenderMag toolkit. GenderMag provides personas whose approaches to software use fall across the spectrum of gender-stereotypic actions and motivations. The personas are used as the basis for cognitive walkthroughs of the system under investigation, to uncover potential gender biases in system functionality and interface design. We uncover significant such biases in GLI.

    View record details
  • Improving access to large-scale digital libraries through semantic-enhanced search and disambiguation

    Hinze, Annika; Taube-Schock, Craig; Bainbridge, David; Matamua, Rangi; Downie, J. Stephen (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    With 13,000,000 volumes comprising 4.5 billion pages of text, it is currently very difficult for scholars to locate relevant sets of documents that are useful in their research from the HathiTrust Digital Libary (HTDL) using traditional lexically-based retrieval techniques. Existing document search tools and document clustering approaches use purely lexical analysis, which cannot address the inherent ambiguity of natural language. A semantic search approach offers the potential to overcome the shortcoming of lexical search, but even if an appropriate network of ontologies could be decided upon it would require a full semantic markup of each document. In this paper, we present a conceptual design and report on the initial implementation of a new framework that affords the benefits of semantic search while minimizing the problems associated with applying existing semantic analysis at scale. Our approach avoids the need for complete semantic document markup using pre-existing ontologies by developing an automatically generated Concept-in-Context (CiC) network seeded by a priori analysis of Wikipedia texts and identification of semantic metadata. Our Capisco system analyzes documents by the semantics and context of their content. The disambiguation of search queries is done interactively, to fully utilize the domain knowledge of the scholar. Our method achieves a form of semantic-enhanced search that simultaneously exploits the proven scale benefits provided by lexical indexing.

    View record details
  • SEPSen: Semantic event processing at the sensor nodes for energy efficient wireless sensor networks

    Kasi, Mumraiz Khan; Hinze, Annika; Legg, Catherine; Jones, Steve (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Traditionally in WSNs, the sensor nodes are used only for capturing data that is then later analyzed in the more powerful gateway nodes. This requires a continuous communication that wastes energy at the sensor nodes and greatly reduces the overall network lifetime. We propose a semantic-based in-network data processing that reduces energy consumption and improves the scalability of heterogeneous sensor networks. Ontology fragments in each sensor node help identify the data routed through the sensor network. We have adapted a matching algorithm to process a changing knowledge base. Simulation results show that the networks' energy consumption is considerably reduced.

    View record details
  • Digital news resources: An autoethnographic study of news encounters

    Cunningham, Sally Jo; Nichols, David M.; Hinze, Annika; Bowen, Judy (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We analyze a set of 35 autoethnographies of news encounters, created by students in New Zealand. These comprise rich descriptions of the news sources, modalities, topics of interest, and news ‘routines’ by which the students keep in touch with friends and maintain awareness of personal, local, national, and international events. We explore the implications for these insights into news behavior for further research to support digital news systems.

    View record details
  • Mobile annotation of geo-locations in digital books

    Hinze, Annika; Littlewood, Haley; Bainbridge, David (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This demo paper introduces an editor for manual annotation of locations in digital books, using a crowd-sourcing approach. It is the first of its kind and allows book lovers and literary travel enthusiasts to annotate the locations in their digital books on-the-go. We show both a mobile and a desktop version, and briefly explain the linkage to the Digital Library that is holding the digital books.

    View record details
  • Hermes: a notification service for digital libraries

    Faensen, Daniel; Faultstich, L.; Schweppe, Heinz; Hinze, Annika; Steidinger, A. (2001)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The high publication rate of scholarly material makes searching and browsing an inconvenient way to keep oneself up-to-date. Instead of being the active part in information access, researchers want to be notified whenever a new paper in one's research area is published. While more and more publishing houses or portal sites offer notification services this approach has several disadvantages. We introduce the Hermes alerting service, a service that integrates a variety of different information providers making their heterogeneity transparent for the users. Hermes offers sophisticated filtering capabilities preventing the user from drowning in a flood of irrelevant information. From the user's point of view it integrates the providers into a single source. Its simple provider interface makes it easy for publishers to join the service and thus reaching the potential readers directly. This paper presents the architecture of the Hermes service and discusses the issues of heterogeneity of information sources. Furthermore, we discuss the benefits and disadvantages of message-oriented middleware for implementing such a service for digital libraries.

    View record details
  • Database systems as middleware- event, notifications, messages

    Schweppe, Heinz; Hinze, Annika; Faensen, Daniel (2000)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Database systems have been traditionally used as integration tools. Data integration was the primary goal of first generation systems. After relational technology had become a mature base for application development, new architectures where developed for the tight integration of data, procedures and all kinds of processing. This phase of DBS research and development was dominated by object-oriented database management and specific architectures like Starburst [HaCH 1990], which had a strong impact on current object-relational technology. The ubiquitous computer network has added another facet to the usage of DBS as an integration tool. In distributed environment, middleware aims at making distribution transparent. Corba or RMI are well-known examples. The call-oriented style of communication has been complemented by message-oriented, event-driven interaction of independent programs. System processes use this type of communication for decades. However, it is not well known as a mechanism on the application level - despite the fact that it has been employed for quite some time, e.g. in workflow systems [LeRo 2000]. The event-driven message passing paradigm becomes more and more important for highly distributed applications. Many kinds of interactions between applications follow a common pattern: n inde-pendent providers submit their output as messages, which in turn will be consumed asynchronously by m consumer applications. As opposed to call-level interaction, providers and consumers may or may not know each others identity. In a stock ticker application for example, there is no reason why providers should know the identity of consumers.

    View record details
  • Context-awareness in mobile tourist information systems: challenges for user interaction

    Hinze, Annika; Buchanan, George (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Context in mobile tourist information systems is typically captured as the current location of the user. Few systems consider the user's interests or wider context of the sights. This paper explores ideas of how to model, observe, evaluate, and exploit a richer notion of context in this application area. We discuss the influence of such a richer context model on the user interaction for both the capturing of context and the context-aware user/device interactions.

    View record details
  • Trust and reputation in dynamic scientific communities

    Rana, Omer F.; Hinze, Annika (2004)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The formation of collaboration networks (or communities) is an important latent effect in many computational science undertakings. Generally, collaboration networks bring together participants who wish to achieve some common goal or outcome (often over short time frames). Increasingly, scientific collaborations are becoming interdisciplinary, and scientists are working in informal collaborations to solve complex problems that require multiple types of skills. Such networks generally might consist of participants with complementary or similar skills, who might decide to collaborate to solve more efficiently a single large problem. We argue that, given the diverse skills that such collaborations involve, deciding which partners to cooperate with is both critical and difficult. Two particularly important factors in this process are trust and reputation.

    View record details
  • Supporting Change-Aware Semantic Web Services

    Hinze, Annika (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The Semantic Web is not only evolving into a provider of structured meaningful content and knowledge representation, but also into a provider of services. While most of these services support external users of the SW, we focus on a vital service within the SW – change management and adaptation. Change is a ubiquitous feature of the SW. In this paper, we propose a service architecture that embraces and utilises change to provide higher quality services. We introduce pilot implementations of two supporting services within this architecture.

    View record details
  • Approximative filtering of XML documents in a publish/subscribe system

    Hinze, Annika; Michel, Yann; Schlieder, Torsten (2006-01-16)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Publish/subscribe systems filter published documents and inform their subscribers about documents matching their interests. Recent systems have focussed on documents or messages sent in XML format. Subscribers have to be familiar with the underlying XML format to create meaningful subscriptions. A service might support several providers with slightly differing formats, e.g., several publishers of books. This makes the definition of a successful subscription almost impossible. This paper proposes the use of an approximative language for subscriptions. We introduce the design of our ApproXFilter algorithm for approximative filtering in a publish/subscribe system. We present the results of our performance analysis of a prototypical implementation.

    View record details