72 results for Hinze, Annika, Conference item

  • Keeping Track of the semantic Web: Personalized Event Notification

    Hinze, Annika; Evans, Reuben James Emmanuel (2006)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The semantic web will not be a static collection of formats, data and meta-data but highly dynamic in each aspect. This paper proposes a personalized event notification system for semantic web documents (ENS-SW). The system can intelligently detect and filter changes in semantic web documents by exploiting the semantic structure of those documents. In our prototype, we combine the functionalities of user profiles and distributed authoring systems. Typically, both approaches would lack the ability to handle semantic web documents. This paper introduces the design and implementation of our event notification system for semantic web documents that handles the XML representation of RDF. We analyzed our prototype regarding accuracy and efficiency in change detection. Our system supports sophisticated change detection including partial deletion, awareness for document restructuring, and approximate filter matches.

    View record details
  • Efficient filtering of composite events

    Hinze, Annika (2003)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Event Notification Services (ENS) are used in various applications such as remote monitoring and control, stock tickers, traffic control, or facility management. The performance issues of the filtering of primitive events has been widely studied. However, for a growing number of applications, the rapid notification about the occurrence of composite events is an important issue. Currently, the detection of composite events requires a second filtering step after the identification of the primitive components. In this paper, we propose a single-step method for the filtering of composite events. The method has been implemented and tested within our ENS prototype CompAS. Using our method, the filter response time for composite events is significantly reduced. Additionally, the overall performance of the event filtering has been improved.

    View record details
  • Using ontologies to reason about the usability of interactive medical devices in multiple situations of use

    Bowen, Judy; Hinze, Annika (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Formally modelling interactive software systems and devices allows us to prove properties of correctness about such devices, and thus ensure effectiveness of their use. It also enables us to consider interaction properties such as usability and consistency between the interface and system functionality. Interactive modal devices, that have a fixed interface but whose behaviour is dependent on the mode of the device, can be similarly modelled. Such devices always behave in the same way (i.e. have the same functionality and interaction possibilities) irrespective of how, or where, they are used. However, a user’s interaction with such devices may vary according to the physical location or environment in which they are situated (we refer to this as a system’s context and usage situation). In this paper we look at a particular example of a safety-critical system, that of a modal interactive medical syringe pump, which is used in multiple situations. We consider how ontologies can be used to reason about the effects of different situations on the use of such devices.

    View record details
  • Tipple: location-triggered mobile access to a digital library for audio books

    Hinze, Annika; Bainbridge, David (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper explores the role of audio as a means to access books in a digital library while being at the location referred to in the books. The books are sourced from the digital library and can either be accompanied by pre-recorded audio or synthesized using text-to-speech. The paper details the functional requirements, design and implementation of Tipple. The concept was extensively tested in three field studies.

    View record details
  • Tracking and re-finding printed material using a personal digital library

    Hinze, Annika; Dighe, Amay (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Most web searches aim to re-find previously known information or documents. Keeping track of one’s digital and printed reading material is known to be a challenging and costly task. We describe the design, implementation and evaluation of our Human-centred workplace (HCW) – a system that supports the tracking of physical document printouts. HCW embeds QR codes in the document printout, stores the documents in a personal Digital Library, and uses cameras in the office to track changes in the document locations. We explored the HCW in three evaluations, using the system over several weeks in an office setting, a user study in a lab environment, and extensive functional tests.

    View record details
  • A detailed investigation of memory requirements for publish/subscribe filtering algorithms

    Bittner, Sven; Hinze, Annika (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Various filtering algorithms for publish/subscribe systems have been proposed. One distinguishing characteristic is their internal representation of Boolean subscriptions: They either require conversions into DNFs (canonical approaches) or are directly exploited in event filtering (non-canonical approaches). In this paper, we present a detailed analysis and comparison of the memory requirements of canonical and non-canonical filtering algorithms. This includes a theoretical analysis of space usages as well as a verification of our theoretical results by an evaluation of a practical implementation. This practical analysis also considers time (filter) efficiency, which is the other important quality measure of filtering algorithms. By correlating the results of space and time efficiency, we conclude when to use non-canonical and canonical approaches.

    View record details
  • Re-finding physical documents: extending a digital library into a human-centred workplace

    Hinze, Annika; Dighe, Amay (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    It is often difficult for busy people to keep track of or re-find documents in their own workplace. Very few methods have been developed for finding a physical object’s location in an office. Most of the existing methods require that some kind of structured approach be followed by the user. We created a “Human-Centred Workplace” system that does not require orderly users. The system embeds passive tags in documents and uses cameras in the office to track changes in the documents’ locations. This paper introduces the design and implementation of the system, explores its use in an office environment and gives a initial evaluation of our prototypical implementation.

    View record details
  • Mobile annotation of geo-locations in digital books

    Hinze, Annika; Littlewood, Haley; Bainbridge, David (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This demo paper introduces an editor for manual annotation of locations in digital books, using a crowd-sourcing approach. It is the first of its kind and allows book lovers and literary travel enthusiasts to annotate the locations in their digital books on-the-go. We show both a mobile and a desktop version, and briefly explain the linkage to the Digital Library that is holding the digital books.

    View record details
  • Alerting in a Digital Library environment - Do Channels meet the requirements?

    Faensen, Daniel; Hinze, Annika; Schweppe, Heinz (1998)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    An Alerting Service (AS) informs its clients about new information provided by several suppliers. Special interests of clients can be defined as profiles. In the context of digital libraries, suppliers are the providers of documents. Providers are typically scientific publishers. In this paper we assume, that the providers are known to the clients. A general model and architecture of an Alerting Service is given in [1]. Channel technology has been developed for broadcast of news and continous streams of data like stock rates. For the digital library enviroment a finer granularity in profile definition than for common broadcasting is needed. In contrast to broadcast services, publishing events of multiple providers have to be presented to each client in a uniform way. In this summary we evaluate how the two competing approaches of Channel technology, Netscape’s Netcaster [3] and Microsofts Active Channels [2] meet these requirements. To satisfy user’s needs events have to be filtered by more or less complex profiles, e. g. a set of documents (like journals), a list of keywords (selected arbitraryly or from a thesaurus) or a query in a full-fledged query language like STARTS [4]. An easy-to-use and powerful profile definition language is one requirement for an AS. The second is a unified view, that means splitting the n:m-relationship between providers and clients. The use of both technologies strongly depends on how the contents is to be filtered, i.e. how the user profile is to be defined.

    View record details
  • Digital news resources: An autoethnographic study of news encounters

    Cunningham, Sally Jo; Nichols, David M.; Hinze, Annika; Bowen, Judy (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We analyze a set of 35 autoethnographies of news encounters, created by students in New Zealand. These comprise rich descriptions of the news sources, modalities, topics of interest, and news ‘routines’ by which the students keep in touch with friends and maintain awareness of personal, local, national, and international events. We explore the implications for these insights into news behavior for further research to support digital news systems.

    View record details
  • Judging a book by its cover: interface elements that affect reader selection of ebooks

    McKay, Dana; Buchanan, George; Vanderschantz, Nicholas; Timpany, Claire; Cunningham, Sally Jo; Hinze, Annika (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Digital library research has demonstrated the impact of content presentation on both search and reading behaviours. In this paper, we scrutinise the influence of ebook presentation on user behaviour, focussing on document thumbnails and the first page view. We demonstrate that flaws in presentation increase the volume of short time-span reading, and reduce the likelihood of long-span reading when compared to other documents. This reflects other patterns of information seeking behaviour that demonstrate increased short-term reading when information content is uncertain, and suggests an ineffective use of reader time on less useful content.

    View record details
  • How to take a book off the shelf: Learning about ebooks from using a physical library

    Vanderschantz, Nicholas; Hinze, Annika; Cunningham, Sally Jo; Timpany, Claire; McKay, Dana (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Little is known about how people select ebooks or books. This paper reports initial results of a study in which we observe patrons of two libraries when selecting books. From the results of the study we aim to gain insights into book selection strategies, which may be used to support ebook selection and purchasing.

    View record details
  • User-defined semantic enrichment of full-text documents: Experiences and lessons learned

    Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf; Schlegel, Alexa; Luczak-Rösch, Markus (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Semantic annotation of digital documents is typically done at meta-data level. However, for fine-grained access semantic enrichment of text elements or passages is needed. Automatic annotation is not of sufficient quality to enable focused search and retrieval: either too many or too few terms are semantically annotated. User-defined semantic enrichment allows for a more targeted approach. We developed a tool for semantic annotation of digital documents and conducted a number of studies to evaluate its acceptance by and usability for non-expert users. This paper discusses the lessons learned about both the semantic enrichment process and our methodology of exposing non-experts to semantic enrichment.

    View record details
  • An exploration of ebook selection behavior in academic library collections

    McKay, Dana; Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf; Vanderschantz, Nicholas; Timpany, Claire; Cunningham, Sally Jo (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Academic libraries have offered ebooks for some time, however little is known about how readers interact with them while making relevance decisions. In this paper we seek to address that gap by analyzing ebook transaction logs for books in a university library.

    View record details
  • Semantic enrichment by non-experts: Usability of manual annotation tools

    Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf; Luczak-Rösch, Markus; Paschke, Adrian (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Most of the semantic content available has been generated automatically by using annotation services for existing content. Automatic annotation is not of sufficient quality to enable focused search and retrieval: either too many or too few terms are semantically annotated. User-defined semantic enrichment allows for a more targeted approach. We developed a tool for semantic annotation of digital documents and conducted an end-user study to evaluate its acceptance by and usability for non-expert users. This paper presents the results of this user study and discusses the lessons learned about both the semantic enrichment process and our methodology of exposing non-experts to semantic enrichment.

    View record details
  • Evolving triggers for dynamic environments

    Trajcevski, Goce; Scheuermann, Peter; Ghica, Oliviu; Hinze, Annika; Voisard, Agnes (2006)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In this work we address the problem of managing the reactive behavior in distributed environments in which data continuously changes over time, where the users may need to explicitly express how the triggers should be (self) modified. To enable this we propose the (ECA)2 – Evolving and Context-Aware Event-Condition-Action paradigm for specifying triggers that capture the desired reactive behavior in databases which manage distributed and continuously changing data. Since both the monitored event and the condition part of the trigger may be continuous in nature, we introduce the concept of metatriggers to coordinate the detection of events and the evaluation of conditions.

    View record details
  • Design exploration of ebook interfaces for personal ebook libraries on tablet devices

    Vanderschantz, Nicholas; Timpany, Claire; Hinze, Annika (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Mobile eBook readers and reader applications are readily available and are marketed as convenient for accessing personal eBook collections. Different brands of readers and apps are frequently evaluated and compared in consumer, trade, and popular magazines, but rarely in academic studies. This present study examines nine personal digital library (pDL) interfaces, from which design cues are drawn and paper prototypes of pDL for eBooks are developed. The paper prototypes are evaluated in a usability study to elicit the eBook display preferences of users.

    View record details
  • Contrasting object-relational and RDF modelling in a Tourist Information System

    Hinze, Annika; Loeffler, Katja; Voisard, Agnès (2004)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Advanced tourist information systems should deliver more than weakly-related static information about sights. Instead, semantically-rich information about sights (e.g., groups of sights with same characteristics) should be delivered to the mobile users. Furthermore, tourists should not be overwhelmed by a stream of superfluous data unrelated to their interest and location. Personalization of the information delivery to each traveller, together with his or her travel history, is therefore crucial. In this paper, we describe the lessons learned from developing the kernel of an advanced tourist information provider using a semantic network of sight-related information and considering the travellers' interest and travel route. The system is a combination of event notification services (publish/subscribe) and location-based services (LBS). For modelling all relevant data, two approaches are compared: a RDF-based model and an object-relational model.

    View record details
  • Classification and analysis of distributed event filtering algorithms

    Bittner, Sven; Hinze, Annika (2004)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Publish/subscribe middleware provides efficient support for loosely coupled communication in distributed systems. A number of different distributed message-filtering algorithms have been proposed. So far, a systematic comparison and analysis of these filter algorithms is still missing. This paper proposes a classification scheme for distributed filter algorithms that supports the theoretical and practical analysis of these algorithms. We present a first cut theoretical evaluation and a subsequent practical evaluation of promising candidate algorithms. Factors that are considered include the characteristics of the underlying network and application-related constraints. Based on the findings of these evaluations, we conclude with a summary of the strengths and weaknesses of the algorithms that we have studied.

    View record details
  • A Meta-Service for Event Notification

    Jung, Doris; Hinze, Annika (2004)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The integration of event information from diverse event notification sources is, as with meta-searching over heterogeneous search engines, a challenging task. Due to the complexity of event filter languages, known solutions for heterogeneous searching cannot be applied for event notification In this paper, we propose the concept and design of a Meta Service for Event Notification. We define transformation rules for exchanging event filter definitions and event notifications between various event services and sources. We transform each filter defined at a meta-service into a filter expressed in the language of each event notification source. Due to unavoidable asymmetry in the semantics of different langues, some superfluous information may be delivered to the meta-service. These notifications are then post-processed to reduce the number of spurious messages. We present a survey and classification of filter languages for event notification, which serves as basis for the transformation rules. The proposed rules are implemented in a prototype transformation module for a Meta Service for Event Notification.

    View record details