8 results for Jackson, C

  • Fast tracking the vaccine licensure process to control an epidemic of serogroup B meningococcal disease in New Zealand.

    Lennon, Diana; Jackson, C; Wong, S; Horsfall, M; Stewart, Joanna; Reid, S (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Epidemics of serogroup B meningococcal disease are rare. Strain-specific outer membrane vesicle vaccines, which are not marketed, are the only current tool for control. A correlate of protection is ill defined, but published data suggest that measured serum bactericidal antibody levels parallel efficacy. Even infants can mount a strain-specific antibody response to a strain-specific vaccine. New Zealand???s epidemic (1991???2007; peak rate [in 2001], 17.4 cases per 100,000 persons) was dominated by a single strain. After a 5-year search (1996???2001) for a manufacturer for a strain-specific outer membrane vesicle vaccine, a fast-tracked research program (2002???2004) determined the safety and immunogenicity of vaccine in infants (2 age groups: 6???10 weeks and 6???8 months), children (age, 16???24 months), and school-aged children (age, 8???12 years) after an adult trial. The vaccine was reactogenic, compared with control vaccines (meningococcal C conjugate and routine infant vaccines), but retention was high. Three vaccine doses produced antibody levels (measured by serum bactericidal assay) that were considered to be adequate for public health intervention. However, in young infants, a fourth dose was required to achieve levels equivalent to those achieved by other age groups. Provisional licensure by New Zealand???s MedSafe was based on serological criteria strengthened by bridged safety data from studies of the parent outer membrane vesicle vaccine, independent assessment of manufacturing quality, and a clear plan for safety monitoring and effectiveness evaluation after licensure.

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  • Kicked out of school and suffering: The health needs of alternative education youth in New Zealand

    Clark, TC; Smith, J; Raphael, D; Jackson, C; Denny, S; Fleming, T; Ameratunga, S; Crengle, S (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Anonymous self-report health and wellbeing surveys were completed by alternative education (AE) students in the Auckland and Northland regions of New Zealand, and 11 semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants about their perceptions of health issues for AE students. Both groups reported concerning health-risk behaviours among AE students, including drug and alcohol abuse, depressive symptoms and dangerous driving. Health services have consistently failed to engage AE students in effective primary and preventative care that includes their wha"nau/family. Signi!cant changes to the current New Zealand health system are required to provide appropriate and effective health care for students attending AE facilities.

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  • Neonatal invasive pneumococcal disease in NewZealand in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccination 2009 - 2013

    Burton, C; Mount, V; Jackson, C; Heffernan, H; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Being in Trouble with the Police and Associations with Mental Health Outcomes Amongst Alternative Education Students in New Zealand

    Clark, Terryann; Robinson, Elizabeth; Fleming, Theresa; Smith, J; Denny, S; Jackson, C; Raphael, Deborah; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Students who are excluded from mainstream education are vulnerable to negative health, social and educational outcomes. The purpose of this analysis to is to explore whether being in trouble with the Police is associated with mental health problems such as depressive symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity-inattention symptoms, marijuana use and binge drinking for students attending Alternative Education (AE) in New Zealand.

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  • Kicked out of School and Suffering: The Health Needs of Alternative Education Youth in New Zealand

    Fleming, Theresa; Clark, Terryann; Smith, J; Raphael, Deborah; Jackson, C; Denny, Simon; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Crengle, Suzanne (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Anonymous self-report health and wellbeing surveys were completed by alternative education (AE) students in the Auckland and Northland regions of New Zealand, and 11 semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants about their perceptions of health issues for AE students. Both groups reported concerning health-risk behaviours among AE students, including drug and alcohol abuse, depressive symptoms and dangerous driving. Health services have consistently failed to engage AE students in effective primary and preventative care that includes their wha??nau/family. Signi!cant changes to the current New Zealand health system are required to provide appropriate and effective health care for students attending AE facilities.

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  • International collaboration in innovating health systems

    van Weel, C; Turnbull, D; Whitehead, E; Bazemore, A; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Jackson, C; Lam, CL; van der Linden, BA; Meyers, D; van den Muijsenbergh, M; Phillips, R; Ramirez-Aranda, JM; Tamblyn, R; van Weel-Baumgarten, E (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity to an OMV meningococcal B vaccine in children and adolescents.

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Jackson, C; Stewart, Joanna; Coster, G; Turner, Nicola; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Lennon, Diana (2015-04)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Pain on vaccine injection and subsequent site reactions of pain and swelling may influence confidence in vaccines and their uptake. This study aimed to identify factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity following administration of a strain specific meningococcal B outer membrane vesicle vaccine. A retrospective analysis of data was conducted from a phase II single center randomized observer-blind study that evaluated the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of this vaccine in two cohorts of healthy eight to 12??year old children. Vaccine administration technique was observed by an unblinded team member and the vaccine administrator instructed on standardized administration. Participants kept a daily diary to record local reactions (erythema, induration and swelling) and pain for seven days following receipt of the vaccine. Explanatory variables were cohort, vaccine, age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, atopic history, history of frequent infections, history of drug reactions, pain on injection, vaccinator, school population socioeconomic status, serum bactericidal antibody titer against the vaccine strain NZ98/254, and total IgG. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted using ordinal logistic regression for factors relating to pain on injection and reactogenicity. Perceived pain on injection was related to vaccine formulation, vaccine administrator and ethnicity. Reactogenicity outcomes varied with ethnicity and vaccine administrator. Maintaining community and parental confidence in vaccine safety without drawing attention to differences between individuals and groups is likely to become increasingly difficult. Vaccine administration technique alone has the potential to significantly reduce pain experienced on injection and local vaccine reactions.

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  • Neonatal invasive pneumococcal disease: New Zealand experience in the era of pneumococcal vaccination

    Mount, V; Burton, C; Jackson, C; Heffernan, H; Best, Emma (2017-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) became a notifiable disease in New Zealand in 2008, and in the same year pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was added to the childhood immunisation schedule. DESIGN: This was a retrospective study of IPD in infants aged <30 days old. CONCLUSION: Strategies such as maternal vaccination or accelerated neonatal vaccination may be beneficial to protect neonates at high risk of IPD.

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