17 results for Jansen, C.

  • Leading and managing: People, culture and vision

    Jansen, C. (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Overview • leadership vs management • building engagement • cranking up our leadership 1. proactive mentoring 2. fostering interaction 3. shared power 4. collective values and vision

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  • To all the edupreneurs

    Jansen, C.; Doig, C. (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    keynote address

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  • Experiential Approaches with Challenging Adolescents

    Jansen, C. (2004)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Experiential approaches with challenging adolescents are numerous and widely varied both in New Zealand and around the world. This paper begins by defining „challenging adolescents‟ and „experiential approaches‟. It then goes on to explore the relevant literature and reviews the strengths and limitations of an experiential approach with this population. It concludes that although there is no shortage of anecdotal evidence to support the notion that this type of programme is beneficial and can help an individual make significant changes during the programme, there is doubt over the longevity of these changes after the young person returns to their „home‟ setting. This paper promotes the design and delivery of multi modal programmes, where the adventure approach works in partnership with other interventions focussed on other areas of the young person life. It also explores the diverse skills and knowledge required by staff to implement such programmes and suggests two possible alternatives to providing these competencies.

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  • Situational Leadership for Developing Group Culture

    Jansen, C. (2008)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Professionals working with groups of young people often experience the following challenge: “How do we develop the motivation and cohesion of this group to allow us to work on the key objectives we are here for?” This paper begins by exploring the process of group development and then goes on to map out a conceptual framework for leadership of these groups. It suggests that professionals must be prepared to adopt a range of leadership styles and that the match between these leadership styles and the groups needs at any given time is a crucial factor in this group development. The paper then goes on to explore potential issues in adopting a situational leadership style including congruence with each professional‟s values and „natural‟ style, and the dilemmas that result from having to develop a „new‟ style to match the developing needs of the group.

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  • Schools as Learning Communities? Leadership through Appreciative Inquiry

    Jansen, C.; Cammock, P.; Conner, L. (2010)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper outlines evidence emphasizing the importance of educational leaders prioritizing the development of ‘learning communities’ within the staff and students at their schools. It suggests that although schools are most certainly institutes of learning in terms of the classroom processes they create for their students, that there is some question as to whether schools as organisations be accurately described as “learning communities”? It goes on to describe an innovative leadership project that involved the directors of adolescent focused NGO’s (non government organisations) in Aotearoa New Zealand where leaders used Appreciative Inquiry (AI) processes to explore their own leadership through the development of a ‘learning community’. This article focuses on how the two guiding principles of “positive focus” and “collaboration” enabled growth trajectories where participants gained agency to co-create a highly productive learning space. Five key strategies are identified namely, flexible and negotiated structure, sharing powerful stories, cycles of exploration, individual and collective reflection and significant time frame. The paper then makes suggestions for how these strategies could be used in the development of such a ‘learning community’ in a school setting.

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  • Exploring emergence in complexity research: Comparison of emergence across projects

    Hussain, H.; Conner, L.; Jansen, C.; Mayo, E. (2010)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    This symposium explores emergence in research projects that are dynamic and complex, where researchers are constantly changing the direction of the project as it unfolds. It presents a theoretical framework for such an exploration using the language of complexity in terms of concepts such as emergence, complex systems and enabling constraints. We weave the example of our symposium group processes to illustrate the concepts. We use the framework to compare three different projects which have given rise to emergence, i.e., the creation of a new phenomenon, and consider how these concepts echo through the varied research investigations. Researchers might find this framework liberating in research that is dynamic and complex. We have chosen to combine all the presentations in the symposium into one paper because it enables us to display the multi-layered nature of complexity thinking.

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  • Creating a Professional Learning Community: Embedding AI in a Complexity-Thinking Framework

    Jansen, C. (2011)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article explores an approach to developing organisational and leadership capacity through the development of a professional learning community. This particular community was formed using an approach that integrates the framework of AI with complexity thinking to inform professional learning processes. The experience provides a new perspective on how AI applications can occasion emergence in professional learning, inform leadership of organisations and create a nexus of innovation.

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  • Leadership for Emergence: Exploring organisations through a living system lens

    Jansen, C.; Cammock, P.; Conner, L. (2011)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this article, we outline a research project with adolescent-focused NGOs (non-government organisations) in Christchurch, New Zealand. This project involved 25 managers who used appreciative inquiry process methodology to explore their leadership practices, beliefs, and values. Throughout the article, we construct a conceptual leadership frame for fostering the emergence of adaptive, innovative and responsive organisational capacity that allows organisations to more readily adapt to the complex and changing conditions in which they operate. We describe this frame as a living system lens that is based on viewing organisations as complex adaptive systems of the kind readily found in the natural world. We go on to outline the leaders’ reflections as they drew strong connections between the dynamics found in complex adaptive systems and their own organisations. Proactive mentoring, fostering interaction and shared learning, strategies for distributing power and decentralising control, and exploration and articulation of deeply held values emerged as the key leadership enactments that these leaders implemented in their roles.

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  • Leaders building professional learning communities: appreciative inquiry in action

    Jansen, C.; Conner, L.; Cammock, P. (2010)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article explores an approach to developing organisational and leadership capacity through the development of a professional learning community. The project involved 25 managers of adolescent-focused non-government organisations (NGOs) who participated in a 14-month collaborative development project that incorporated appreciative inquiry processes. Two guiding principles of appreciative inquiry – a positive focus and collaboration – framed the process for the development of a professional learning community that led to a highly productive collaborative learning space. Five key success components emerged during the project: a flexible and negotiated structure to the professional learning; a focus on positive stories; cycles of exploration and ameliatory modification to their work; individual and collective reflection; and a substantial period of time over which to conduct the development process. The potential transferability of these components to development of professional learning communities in education is explored.

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  • Exploring Education for Sustainability in Training Outdoor Educators

    Jansen, C.; Boardman, E. (2011)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Positive Youth Development in Aotearoa

    Jansen, C.; Bruce, J.; Williams, A.; Campbell, J.; Pawson, P.; Harrington, J.; Major, D. (2010)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Positive Youth Development (PYD) has been described as an “approach that guides communities in the way they organise programmes, people and supports so that young people can develop to their full potential “(Pittman). This Positive Youth Development in Aotearoa (PYDA) framework seeks to explore the confluence between the various approaches to PYD documented in local and international literature, with the grass roots experiences of young people and organisations in Aotearoa / New Zealand. We hope to promote fresh thinking by those working with young people and the funding providers supporting them. This includes both private and public funders of adolescent focused programmes across a range of professions (social work, youth work, education, counselling, social services, corrections, justice etc), as well as managers, programme leaders and programme designers, the adults working with young people as well as parents, communities and young people themselves. In essence this PYDA framework suggests that both informal and formal initiatives, activities and programmes intentionally weave connections by intergrating two key focuses and adopting three key approaches;Key Outcomes 1) Developing the whole person. 2) Developing connected communities. Key Approaches 1) Strength based. 2) Respectful relationships. 3) Building ownership and empowerment.In the following pages each of these components is explored and linked to the experiences of young people in Canterbury who have come into contact with youth development organisations. The Positive Youth Development in Aotearoa framework (PYDA) has been developed by the Youth Advisory Group (YAG) for the Wayne Francis Charitable Trust (WFCT) a Christchurch-based private family philanthropic Trust. The Trust’s funding focus is on young people from 0-25 years. As part of its strategic approach WFCT commissioned the YAG to develop criteria against which organisations and projects being considered could be assessed as to whether they supported young people appropriately. This document has grown out of research commissioned by WFCT in 2009 and originally published in the Youth Studies Australia journal, ‘Youth Work that is of value: Towards a model of best practice’.

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  • Developing challenging young people: Honouring their authentic story

    Jansen, C.; Pawson, P. (2011)

    Chapters
    University of Canterbury Library

    Worldwide, a multitude of adventure-based outdoor programmes exist that are designed to develop 'challenging' young people. Recently, Aotearoa/ New Zealand has seen a resurgence of interest from central government in implementing programmes for such young people that draw on military models of practise. The philosophy and format of adventure therapy programmes implemented by St John of God Waipuna in Otautahi/Christchurch Aotearoa/ New Zealand present a strong contrast to these military-style programmes. Evaluation of these programmes suggests that if adventure-based programmes are to be effective in developing young people and sustaining change, they must focus on developing all aspects of the young person. This approach is grounded in building respectful and meaningful relationships among everyone involved with the programme, and that approach, in turn, is predicated on power sharing and taking responsibility for oneself. The over-arching aim is to give young people a sense of ownership. This is achieved by an intentional shift throughout the programme from dependence, through independence and on to interdependence. The paper interweaves consideration of these aspects, especially in terms of how they have informed the design and delivery of the Waipuna programmes, with various models of personal development and leadership, along with the self-reported narrative of a young person involved in one of these programmes.

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  • Leading and managing: People, culture and vision

    Jansen, C. (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Keynote address

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  • Developing professional learning communities through Appreciative Inquiry

    Jansen, C. (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Seeding educational innovation: Emergence through adaptive leadership

    Jansen, C. (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Leveraging system thinking in schools

    Jansen, C. (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Strategising towards 'inside-out' organisational change

    Jansen, C. (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Overview • our change inquiry • frameworks for leading change • positive deviancy /outliers • diffusion of change • organisational change processes

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