5 results for Jermy, M.

  • Optimal handlebar position for track cyclists

    Underwood, L.; Jermy, M. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out on seven male and seven female track cyclists and the drag measured for their current favoured racing position and for different handlebar height and separation combinations deviating from their current favoured position. The handlebars were raised or lowered using spacers on the stem, and the elbow pads were placed wider apart or closer together using the adjustment slots on the pads. The degree to which adjustments were made was dependent on the equipment used, as not all handlebars had the same amount of adjustment. The drag area was calculated from the measured drag force and the results for drag area plotted for each athlete in each position to identify the optimal handlebar position for each athlete. The results showed that the handlebar height had a greater influence on the drag area compared to handlebar separation, but that there was a high degree of variability between athletes as to the optimal handlebar position.

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  • Optimal handlebar position for track cyclists

    Underwood, L.; Jermy, M. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out on seven male and seven female track cyclists and the drag measured for their current favoured racing position and for different handlebar height and separation combinations deviating from their current favoured position. The handlebars were raised or lowered using spacers on the stem, and the elbow pads were placed wider apart or closer together using the adjustment slots on the pads. The degree to which adjustments were made was dependent on the equipment used, as not all handlebars had the same amount of adjustment. The drag area was calculated from the measured drag force and the results for drag area plotted for each athlete in each position to identify the optimal handlebar position for each athlete. The results showed that the handlebar height had a greater influence on the drag area compared to handlebar separation, but that there was a high degree of variability between athletes as to the optimal handlebar position.

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  • Strategic Analysis of Continuity for Complex Energy and Environment Systems for Developing Regions

    Hamm, A.; Krumdieck, S.; Jermy, M. (2007)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    It is possible that in the near future, energy engineering will be called upon to help society adapt to permanently constrained fuel supplies, constrained green house gas emissions, and electricity supply systems running with minimal capacity margins. The goal of this research is to develop an analytical method for adaptive energy systems engineering within the context of resource constraints. The method involves assessing available energy resources, environmental and social issues, and economic activities. A spectrum of development options is identified for a given region and a Reference Energy Demand is calculated for each representative level. A spectrum of conceptual Reference Energy System Models is generated for each development level with a range of renewable energy penetration. The outcome is a matrix of energy system investment and resource utilization for the range of energy service level defined by the development level. These models are then used for comparative risk assessment. The result is an easily understood visual based investment and risk assessment for both development and adaptation to constrained resource availability. The above approach is being applied to a relatively simple case study on Rotuma, an isolated Pacific Island society. The case study results will show a clear development space for Rotuma where needs and services are in balance with investment, local resource availability and environmental constraints.

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  • CVD flow field modelling using the quiet direct simulation (QDS) method

    Cave, H.; Lim, C.-W.; Jermy, M.; Wu, J.-S.; Smith, M.R.; Krumdieck, S. (2009)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this paper, the Quiet Direct Simulation (QDS) method is used to model the unsteady jet development in a Pulsed Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition (PP-CVD) reactor. QDS is a novel method of gas flow simulation which is able to compute true-direction fluxes of mass, momentum and energy in a computationally efficient and accurate manner. The scheme is ideal for the simulation of novel CVD processes like PP-CVD which include highly unsteady flow structures which has previously proved extremely difficult to simulate. Here, the axisymmetric QDS solver is outlined and the injection phase of a PP-CVD reactor is simulated.

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  • Liquid droplet evaporation in simulations of the flow in pulsed-pressure MOCVD

    Lim, C-W, Cave, H.; Jermy, M.; Krumdieck, S. (2009)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this paper, a numerical model of the liquid precursor droplet flash evaporation and transport is introduced. This droplet model is coupled with the Quiet Direct Simulation (QDS) scheme to model the unsteady flow development in a Pulsed Pressure MOCVD reactor. A preliminary simulation of the PP-MOCVD process including the injection and pump down phase is conducted. The simulation results are consistent with the measured pressure change in the PP-MOCVD process.

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