15 results for Jones, Alister, Book item

  • The contructivist paradigm and some implications for science content and pedagogy

    Carr, Malcolm; Barker, Miles; Bell, Beverley; Biddulph, Fred; Jones, Alister; Kirkwood, Valda; Pearson, John; Symington, David (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Through a comparison of the widely-held traditional view of science with the constructivist view of science, we argue that the constructivist view of the content of science has important implications for classroom teaching and learning. This alternative view of science concepts as human constructs, scrutinised by application of the rules of the game of science, raises many challenges for teachers. Reconceptualisation of teachers' views of the nature of science and of learning in science is important for a constructivist pedagogy. We argue here that open discussion of the 'rules of the game' of science would contribute to better learning in the classroom, since learners would be better equipped to change their existing concepts by knowing more about the nature of science itself.

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  • Technology education in the New Zealand curriculum

    Jones, Alister (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter, the way in which experience of existing school programmes influences teacher perceptions of technology education is discussed, and reasons for teaching technology are outlined. A relationship between technology and technology education is suggested and the structure of technology education in the New Zealand technology curriculum is described. A particular focus is the role of technological activities in technology education, and this is developed in the final section.

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  • Exploring the tension and synergies between science and technology in science education

    Jones, Alister (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter explores the way in which technology has been introduced through and by science educators in Australasia in the last 25 years. A number of themes have arisen in this time from using technology to engage students in science, exploring the impact of science on society through technology, considerations of the nature of technology in relation to science, and the exploration and development of technology as a subject in its own right. In this process student and teacher perceptions of technology were explored, as well as teacher change and the influence of teacher/ subject culture through to sustained classroom research and school change and the way in which the introduction of a new subject like technology can influence our thinking around science.

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  • Application of an analytical framework to describe young students' learning in technology

    Milne, Louise; Chambers, Megan; Moreland, Judy; Jones, Alister (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This paper discusses a framework for describing and analysing how young students (5–6 years) learn in technology with a view towards enhancing teaching and learning practice in technology. Examples of student work which demonstrate the complexity of learning in technology, and what young children can achieve with appropriate teaching strategies are presented. Holistic aspects as well as associated variables are highlighted.

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  • Technology and science education

    Jones, Alister; Compton, Vicki (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The incorporation of technology into the school curriculum is part of a worldwide trend in education. The way in which technology is incorporated depends on which country the reform is initiated in. The New Zealand Curriculum Framework (Ministry of Education, 1993a) includes science and technology as distinct learning areas. This chapter considers the view of technology expressed in both science in the New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1993b) and in Technology in the New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1995). The chapter is divided into four sections. Firstly, the concept of technology in the science curriculum is identified and discussed; secondly, the use of some types of technological application to enhance the learning of science outcomes is considered; thirdly, the technology curriculum itself is discussed in order to highlight the concept of technology underpinning this statement so that comparisons can be made with the concept employed in the science curriculum, and finally the introduction of technology outcomes by science teachers in a science environment is explored.

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  • Assessment in schools – Technology education and ICT

    Jones, Alister; Cowie, Bronwen; Moreland, Judy (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    People use technology to intervene in the world to expand their possibilities, applying both intellectual and practical resources. It encompasses more than information and communication technologies (ICTs). Technology is included as a curriculum area in many countries where increasing the levels of technological literacy is seen as of intrinsic value. Effective assessment in technology, both formative and summative, needs to accommodate the multifaceted and multimodal nature of technology. ICTs have the potential to enhance classroom assessment practices through the provision of additional modes of representing, recording, and reviewing information on student learning process and products.

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  • Technological infrastructure and implementation environments: The case of laptops for New Zealand teachers.

    Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister; Harlow, Ann (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The integration of ICT is the apparent goal of range of educational initiatives worldwide. To date, however, the impact of ICTs has lagged behind the rhetoric. Rather than technology transforming teaching and learning it appears that teachers often assimilate it into existing practices. This chapter uses Douglas Engelbart’s (1992) notion of an improvement infrastructure to explore and explain the factors that have framed and shaped New Zealand teacher access to, adoption of, and resistance to the use of laptops. Engelbart posits that organizations should aspire to creating three levels of infrastructure for improvement: a core capability infrastructure, an infrastructure that enables the improvement of core work, and an infrastructure that enables the on-going improvement of the improvement processes. Improvement of improvement typically receives the least long-term strategic investment. For teachers with laptops improvement of improvement is what enables teachers to enhance their ability to use their laptop. In this chapter we show that this involves the system of teacher confidence and expertise, teacher professional development opportunities, teacher access to a reliable technological infrastructure, and the existence of a supportive school leadership and culture for ICT/laptop use.

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  • Moving beyond deconstruction and reconstruction: Teacher knowledge as action

    Jones, Alister; Cowie, Bronwen (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Primary teachers generally have a deep knowledge of their students and a broad repertoire of pedagogical practices, particularly practices that involve teacher–student and student–student interactions, but they often lack in-depth content knowledge and have a limited repertoire of subject-specific pedagogies. This is almost always a particular issue for their teaching of science. Pedagogically appropriate teacher engagement of/with students requires teachers to have both appropriate content knowledge and knowledge of their students. In this context the idea of “knowledge in action” is central. In-depth content knowledge and subject-specific pedagogies influence teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge. Effective formative assessment or Assessment for Learning (AfL) interactions mean that teachers need rich and flexible PCK in order to undertake effective interactions with diverse groups of students. In this chapter we highlight what we mean by effective AfL interactions, teachers’ knowledges required for effective interactions and how we might enhance teachers’ knowledges to enhance the potential for student learning.

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  • Technology in science education: Context, contestation, and connection

    Jones, Alister (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The inclusion of technology within science education has been a site of debate, classroom research, and curriculum innovation. This chapter explores the STS movement, perceptions of technology by science teachers, the introduction of technological applications in science, technological problem solving in science classrooms, technology in science curricula, defining the relationship between science and technology, and the integration of science and technology in the curriculum and classroom. Technology in science education can enhance student engagement and make a contribution to scientific literacy in its broadest sense. However, its place is still contested.

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  • The developing field of technology education in New Zealand: The last twenty years

    Jones, Alister (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In the last twenty years technology education in New Zealand has found a place in research, teacher education and classroom practice. This paper traces the development of technology education as a field of study in compulsory education over the last twenty years and explores the curriculum development in the 1990s, the emerging research field during that time as well as teacher pre and in-service development. Figure 1 outlines the key aspects of development of technology education in New Zealand and highlights key features of curriculum, research and teacher education and shows the links between these different aspects in a timeline from 1985 to 2005.

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  • The development of technology education internationally

    Jones, Alister (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The development of technology education within countries and regions is set within the historical, cultural, and political environment. Curriculum, teacher education, and in fact educational research do not sit in isolation from these. Each of the chapters in this section sets out the context for technology education in its respective country and provides a historical and political analysis of the development of technology education as a field of development. The history of technology education is a long one if we consider its development back to the days of craft, and in this section many of the chapters trace the journey from craft through to much broader notions of technology and technological literacy.

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  • The enhancement of ethical thinking

    Jones, Alister; McKim, Anne M.; Reiss, Michael (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The introduction of ethics is already seen by students as an important part of their education and connects school science and technology with the worlds in which they live. It has the potential to connect directly with their concerns and the issues that they consider important. The introduction of ethics, rather than being another area of content to be 'learnt', can also be used as a framework to enhance students' thinking skills. In developing ideas about, and approaches to, ethical thinking an important aspect then is to develop conceptual frameworks of how students make progress in ethical thinking.

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  • Reviewing the field of technology education in New Zealand

    Jones, Alister; Compton, Vicki (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter we discuss the development of technology as a field of study within compulsory education in New Zealand. We argue that technology education has found a place in the national curriculum, research, and teacher education, resulting in technology classroom practice to some degree in all New Zealand schools.

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  • Teaching and learning in the ICT environment

    Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    ICTs are now a central means to be socially, economically, culturally and politically involved in twenty-first century society (Selwyn and Facer, 2007). They are integral to the global flows of knowledge, people and services that characterize the knowledge economy. In this information rich society knowledge is being reconfigured. Knowing and learning are now as much to do with access and participation as they are to do with the acquisition of skills and knowing that. Internationally, governments have endorsed the need for students to be ICT and information literate. The contention is that students will need to be able to access, integrate and evaluate information, construct new knowledge and communicate with others if they are to take their place as active citizens in an increasingly complex and information rich world. Also evident is the view that ICT can enhance student learning within traditional curricula subjects through a positive impact on student motivation and engagement, and that ICT has the potential to change both how and what students learn. To date however the impact of ICT technologies on education and schools has lagged behind what had been expected. This chapter is backgrounded against a national evaluation project on the provision of government-funded laptops to New Zealand schools and teachers carried out by the authors (Cowie, Jones, & Harlow, 2005). This project provided insights into the affordances of laptops/ICT use in schools and the conditions that support ICT use. In this chapter we explore the various dimensions of ICT use by teachers and students and what enables and constrains these

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  • Funding patterns and priorities: An international perspective

    She, Hsiao-Ching; Yore, Larry D.; Anderson, John O.; Erduran, Sibel; Gräber, Wolfgang; Jones, Alister; Klumpers, Johannes; Parker, Stephen; Rollnick, Marissa; Sherwood, Robert D.; Waldrip, Bruce (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Research in literacy and science education converge onto science literacy for all found in many international reforms (Hand, Prain, & Yore, 2001) and the commonalities in targets (all students), goals (science literacy composed of fundamental literacy and understanding the big ideas in science), and pedagogy (constructivist approaches and authentic assessment) across English language arts and science (Ford, Yore, & Anthony, 1997; Yore, Pimm, & Tuan, 2007). Similar claims apply to mathematics literacy and technology literacy. This convergence and the international move to enhance research quality suggest potential relationships amongst research policy, practices, and funding for literacy and science education. Furthermore, such connections should be growing in importance and fiscal priority for funding agencies. In the United States, explicit connections can be seen for research policy and preferred research practice in federal laws—but are there similar connections between policy and practice with research funding of literacy and science education research? Do such relationships exist in other countries? Two recent policies in the United States illustrate the potential connection. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB, 2002) reauthorized a number of federal programs aiming to improve the performance of primary and secondary schools by increasing the standards of accountability for states, school districts, and schools as well as providing parents more flexibility in choosing which schools their children will attend. The NCLB Act, which is open for renewal in 2008/09, requires states to develop assessments in language arts, mathematics, and science to be given to all students in certain grades—if those states are to receive federal funding for schools. The Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002 (ESRA, 2002) reauthorized and strengthened the principal education research, statistics, and evaluation activities of the Department of Education. This act funds the national data collection system that allows federal agencies to oversee the entire national education system and promotes a strong, scientifically rigorous research capacity within education. It is believed that such legislation is critically important to the successful implementation of the education reforms and to transform education into an evidence-based field, commonly called the Gold Standard.

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