3 results for Joseph, S

  • A surgical safety checklist to reduce morbidity and mortality in a global population

    Haynes, AB; Weiser, TG; Berry, WR; Lipsitz, SR; Breizat, A-HS; Dellinger, EP; Herbosa, T; Joseph, S; Kibatala, PL; Lapitan, MC; Merry, AF; Moorthy, K; Reznick, RK; Taylor, B; Gawande, AA; Safe Surgery Saves Lives Study Group (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Surgical care is an integral part of health care throughout the world, with an estimated 234 million operations performed annually.1 This yearly volume now exceeds that of childbirth.2 Surgery is performed in every community: wealthy and poor, rural and urban, and in all regions. The World Bank reported that in 2002, an estimated 164 million disability-adjusted life-years, representing 11% of the entire disease burden, were attributable to surgically treatable conditions.3 Although surgical care can prevent loss of life or limb, it is also associated with a considerable risk of complications and death. The risk of complications is poorly characterized in many parts of the world, but studies in industrialized countries have shown a perioperative rate of death from inpatient surgery of 0.4 to 0.8% and a rate of major complications of 3 to 17%.4,5 These rates are likely to be much higher in developing countries.6-9 Thus, surgical care and its attendant complications represent a substantial burden of disease worthy of attention from the public health community worldwide.

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  • A Surgical Safety Checklist to Reduce Morbidity and Mortality in a Global Population

    Haynes, AB; Weiser, TG; Berry, WR; Lipsitz, SR; Breizat, AS; Dellinger, EP; Herbosa, T; Joseph, S; Kibatala, PL; Lapitan, MC; Merry, Alan; Moorthy, K; Reznick, RK; Taylor, B; Gawande, AA (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Surgery has become an integral part of global health care, with an estimated 234 million operations performed yearly. Surgical complications are common and often preventable. We hypothesized that a program to implement a 19-item surgical safety checklist designed to improve team communication and consistency of care would reduce complications and deaths associated with surgery.

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  • Standardised metrics for global surgical surveillance

    Weiser, TG; Makary, MA; Haynes, AB; Dziekan, G; Berry, WR; Gawande, AA; Sindi, IA; Herbosa, T; Storr, J; Ko, CY; Kozak, LJ; Barraclough, B; Reznick, RK; Taylor, B; Joseph, S; Breizat, A-HS; Merry, Alan; Lapitan, MCM; Donaldson, L; Philip, P; Kibatala, PL; Sayek, I; Darzi, LA; Moorthy, K; Dellinger, EP (2009-10-02)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Public health surveillance relies on standardised metrics to evaluate disease burden and health system performance. Such metrics have not been developed for surgical services despite increasing volume, substantial cost, and high rates of death and disability associated with surgery. The Safe Surgery Saves Lives initiative of WHO's Patient Safety Programme has developed standardised public health metrics for surgical care that are applicable worldwide. We assembled an international panel of experts to develop and define metrics for measuring the magnitude and effect of surgical care in a population, while taking into account economic feasibility and practicability. This panel recommended six measures for assessing surgical services at a national level: number of operating rooms, number of operations, number of accredited surgeons, number of accredited anaesthesia professionals, day-of-surgery death ratio, and postoperative in-hospital death ratio. We assessed the feasibility of gathering such statistics at eight diverse hospitals in eight countries and incorporated them into the WHO Guidelines for Safe Surgery, in which methods for data collection, analysis, and reporting are outlined. ?? World Health Orgnization 2009.

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