4 results for Mackereth, Graham, Thesis

  • Spatial data requirements for animal disease management in New Zealand : a dissertation in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Veterinary Studies (Epidemiology) at Massey University

    Mackereth, Graham

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The science of geology has given rise to techniques for managing and analysiing spatial data. The techniques often deal with samples that represent a continuum, such as mineral samples taken from various locations. Some animal health data is similar in nature to geo-statistical data, such as climate data or soil samples from various points on a farm. Animal health data is commonly discrete rather than continuous in space. Farms are represented as point or area features and attributes of the farm are attached to the features. Spatial analysistechniques were reviewed and comment made about their usefulness and validity in disease management. The spatial data available in New Zealand for managing diseases was examined. Spatial data at a farm level is available in the national database management system Agribase, which records details of rural enterprises. The level of data completeness in Agribase was determined. The number of farms without spatial references varied from 10 to 18 percent, depending on the method used to update Agribase. Spatial data is available for cattle and deer herds in the National Livestock Database (NLDB). The number of herds without spatial data varied from 8 to 15 percent. Changes in the management of land information in New Zealand are resulting in an improvement in the quality and completeness of spatial data. In summary for the management of endemic and exotic diseases, farms should be represented as area features. Point coverage's can be generated from these area features and used in some applications, such as simulation models, and for labelling purposes. To function acceptable the applications tested required that 85% of farms or herds were represented spatially.

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  • Humans and Antarctica: A Model for the World?

    Falconer, Tamsin; Foster, Tui; Mackereth, Graham (2000)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Humans and Antarctica: A model for the world? In what ways has the relationship between humans and Antarctica been exemplary. Should the example be copied? This report examines the key features Of the relationships between humans and Antarctica over time, and their distinctiveness. The report firstly outlines our approach to the topic and then gives some background information on the Antarctic Treaty. The Antarctic Treaty is outlined in some detail as it provides the backdrop for most Of the key relationships happening in Antarctica at present. This is followed by a description and analysis Of the key relationships between humans and Antarctica, both within the Treaty system, and without. The report concludes with a view Of Antarctica as a place Of inspiration, which the authors believe to be the key distinctive Of Antarctic-human relationships. For the purposes Of this report 'Antarctica' follows the Antarctic Treaty definition of 'the sea, land, and ice south of 600 South'. The Sub-antarctic islands have largely been excluded as they are generally not included in Antarctic governance. 'Humans' are considered in terms Of alliances Of states, states, commercial organisations, non-government organisations, the individual and the global public; the various combinations that humans create amongst themselves. 'Model' is considered to be an 'exarnple or demonstration applicable to other circumstances'. 'The rest Of the world' is considered as people, lands, and political systems outside Antarctica or the current system Of governance. The key relationships between humans and Antarctica are analysed under several headings; sovereignty, science; peace; heritage; exploitation; environmentalism; exclusivity, credibility and inspiration. Antarctica seems to play an active role, rather than a passive inanimate role, in these relationships. It is a unique place that provides enlightenment and inspiration for individuals and the world. Humans and Antarctica: A model for the world? In what ways has the relationship between humans and Antarctica been exemplary. Should the example be copied? This report examines the key features Of the relationships between humans and Antarctica over time, and their distinctiveness. The report firstly outlines our approach to the topic and then gives some background information on the Antarctic Treaty. The Antarctic Treaty is outlined in some detail as it provides the backdrop for most Of the key relationships happening in Antarctica at present. This is followed by a description and analysis Of the key relationships between humans and Antarctica, both within the Treaty system, and without. The report concludes with a view Of Antarctica as a place Of inspiration, which the authors believe to be the key distinctive Of Antarctic-human relationships. For the purposes Of this report 'Antarctica' follows the Antarctic Treaty definition of 'the sea, land, and ice south of 600 South'. The Sub-antarctic islands have largely been excluded as they are generally not included in Antarctic governance. 'Humans' are considered in terms Of alliances Of states, states, commercial organisations, non-government organisations, the individual and the global public; the various combinations that humans create amongst themselves. 'Model' is considered to be an 'exarnple or demonstration applicable to other circumstances'. 'The rest Of the world' is considered as people, lands, and political systems outside Antarctica or the current system Of governance. The key relationships between humans and Antarctica are analysed under several headings; sovereignty, science; peace; heritage; exploitation; environmentalism; exclusivity, credibility and inspiration. Antarctica seems to play an active role, rather than a passive inanimate role, in these relationships. It is a unique place that provides enlightenment and inspiration for individuals and the world.

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  • Prevention & management of unwanted organisms in Antarctic wildlife in the Ross dependency

    Mackereth, Graham (2000)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A.workshop on diseases in Antarctic Wildlife was held In August Hobart. A report on the workshop was considered by the Committee for Environmental Protection (CEP II), The committee's response to the report was to agree to the formation of an open-ended contact group to report to CEP Ill on matters arising from the workshop. The terms of reference Of the contact group were to diminish the risk of the introduction and spread of disease to Antarctic wildlife and to detect, determine the cause, and minimise the adverse effects Of unusual wildlife mortality and morbidity events in Antarctica (Kerry et al, 1999). This document looked at these terms Of reference and the recommendations of the workshop in relation to the Ross Dependency. Part 1 of this document focused on practical steps to prevent the introduction or spread of unwanted organisms in the Ross Dependency. It was found that there were already a number of management practices to this end. Minor adjustments and education were recommended to further minimise the risks. Disinfectlon techniques were described in detail. Part 2 of this document examined possible disease detection techniques. Existing science and monitoring activities where found to provide some surveillance for high mortality events. It Was recommended that this passive surveillance be formally organised to maximise the surveillance value of current activities. This would involve identifying indicators and a reporting structure. Active surveillance (surveys and serum banks) were discussed in detail. The organisation of a passive surveillance system was considered to be a higher priority than active surveillance. Part 3 of this document considered what could be done in response to an incident of mass mortality. It outlined a possible incident management system. It was recommended that a Co-ordinated Incident Management System be established for responding to high mortality events. A simulated response to a disease scenario was recommended as a science event to test the proposed incident response system. An investigation into wildlife mortality involves some risk and should be carried out by competent and trained personnel. Procedures for the safe transport of diagnostic specimens were described. A.workshop on diseases in Antarctic Wildlife was held In August Hobart. A report on the workshop was considered by the Committee for Environmental Protection (CEP II), The committee's response to the report was to agree to the formation of an open-ended contact group to report to CEP Ill on matters arising from the workshop. The terms of reference Of the contact group were to diminish the risk of the introduction and spread of disease to Antarctic wildlife and to detect, determine the cause, and minimise the adverse effects Of unusual wildlife mortality and morbidity events in Antarctica (Kerry et al, 1999). This document looked at these terms Of reference and the recommendations of the workshop in relation to the Ross Dependency. Part 1 of this document focused on practical steps to prevent the introduction or spread of unwanted organisms in the Ross Dependency. It was found that there were already a number of management practices to this end. Minor adjustments and education were recommended to further minimise the risks. Disinfectlon techniques were described in detail. Part 2 of this document examined possible disease detection techniques. Existing science and monitoring activities where found to provide some surveillance for high mortality events. It Was recommended that this passive surveillance be formally organised to maximise the surveillance value of current activities. This would involve identifying indicators and a reporting structure. Active surveillance (surveys and serum banks) were discussed in detail. The organisation of a passive surveillance system was considered to be a higher priority than active surveillance. Part 3 of this document considered what could be done in response to an incident of mass mortality. It outlined a possible incident management system. It was recommended that a Co-ordinated Incident Management System be established for responding to high mortality events. A simulated response to a disease scenario was recommended as a science event to test the proposed incident response system. An investigation into wildlife mortality involves some risk and should be carried out by competent and trained personnel. Procedures for the safe transport of diagnostic specimens were described.

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  • Prevention & Management of Unwanted Organisms in Antarctic Wildlife in the Ross Dependency

    Mackereth, Graham (2000)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A workshop on diseases in Antarctic Wildlife was held in August 1998 at Hobart. A report on the workshop was considered by the Committee for Environmental Protection (CEP II). The committee's response to the report was to agree to the formation of an open-ended contact group to report to CEP Ill on matters arising from the workshop. The terms of reference of the contact group were to diminish the risk of the introduction and spread of disease to Antarctic wildlife and to detect, determine the cause, and minimise the adverse effects of unusual wildlife mortality and morbidity events in Antarctica (Kerry et al, 1999). This document looked at these terms of reference and the recommendations Of the workshop in relation to the Ross Dependency. Part 1 of this document focused on practical steps to prevent the introduction or spread of unwanted organisms in the Ross Dependency. It was found that there were already a number of management practices to this end. Minor adjustments and education were recommended to further minimise the risks. Disinfection techniques were described in detail. Part 2 of this document examined possible disease detection techniques. Existing science and monitoring activities where found to provide some surveillance for high mortality events. It was recommended that this passive surveillance be formally organised to maximise the surveillance value of current activities. This would involve identifying indicators and a reporting structure. Active surveillance (surveys and serum banks) were discussed in detail. The organisation of a passive surveillance system was considered to be a higher priority than active surveillance. Part 3 of this document considered what could be done in response to an incident of mass mortality. It outlined a possible incident management system. It was recommended that a Co-ordinated Incident Management System be established for responding to high mortality events. A simulated response to a disease scenario was recommended as a science event to test the proposed incident response system. An investigation into wildlife mortality involves some risk and should be carried out by competent and trained personnel. Procedures for the safe transport of diagnostic specimens were described. A workshop on diseases in Antarctic Wildlife was held in August 1998 at Hobart. A report on the workshop was considered by the Committee for Environmental Protection (CEP II). The committee's response to the report was to agree to the formation of an open-ended contact group to report to CEP Ill on matters arising from the workshop. The terms of reference of the contact group were to diminish the risk of the introduction and spread of disease to Antarctic wildlife and to detect, determine the cause, and minimise the adverse effects of unusual wildlife mortality and morbidity events in Antarctica (Kerry et al, 1999). This document looked at these terms of reference and the recommendations Of the workshop in relation to the Ross Dependency. Part 1 of this document focused on practical steps to prevent the introduction or spread of unwanted organisms in the Ross Dependency. It was found that there were already a number of management practices to this end. Minor adjustments and education were recommended to further minimise the risks. Disinfection techniques were described in detail. Part 2 of this document examined possible disease detection techniques. Existing science and monitoring activities where found to provide some surveillance for high mortality events. It was recommended that this passive surveillance be formally organised to maximise the surveillance value of current activities. This would involve identifying indicators and a reporting structure. Active surveillance (surveys and serum banks) were discussed in detail. The organisation of a passive surveillance system was considered to be a higher priority than active surveillance. Part 3 of this document considered what could be done in response to an incident of mass mortality. It outlined a possible incident management system. It was recommended that a Co-ordinated Incident Management System be established for responding to high mortality events. A simulated response to a disease scenario was recommended as a science event to test the proposed incident response system. An investigation into wildlife mortality involves some risk and should be carried out by competent and trained personnel. Procedures for the safe transport of diagnostic specimens were described.

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