166 results for Merry, Alan, Journal article

  • Acid Aspiration Risk-Factors

    Hutchinson, BR; Merry, Alan (1986-02-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Improving patients' safety by gathering information.

    Runciman, WB; Merry, Alan; Mccall, SA (2001-08-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Managing treatment injury—and response

    Merry, Alan; Seddon, Mary (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Medication administration in anesthesia - time for a paradigm shift

    Stabile, M; Webster, Craig; Merry, Alan (2007)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Safety in Anaesthesia: promoting sustainable change for the future

    Merry, Alan (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Hard lessons for pain researchers

    Merry, Alan; Frampton, CM; Anderson, Brian (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Role of anesthesiologists in WHO safe surgery programs

    Merry, Alan (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The challenges of technological intensification

    Webster, Craig; Stabile, M; Merry, Alan (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Incident reporting, aviation and anaesthesia

    Merry, Alan; Henderson, B (2017-05)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses various reports within the issue on topics including incident reporting, anaesthesia and aviation industry

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  • Incorrect representation of aseptic techniques

    Merry, Alan; Gargiulo, Derryn; Sheridan, Jane; Webster, Craig; Swift, Simon; Torrie, Jocelyn; Weller, Jennifer; Henderson, K; Sturge, Jacqueline (2017-05)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Awareness during general anaesthesia in the first 4,000 incidents reported to webAIRS

    Leslie, K; Culwick, MD; Reynolds, H; Sturge, Jacqueline; Merry, Alan (2017-07)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The aim of this study was to analyse the incidents related to awareness during general anaesthesia in the first 4,000 cases reported to webAIRS-an anaesthetic incident reporting system established in Australia and New Zealand in 2009. Included incidents were those in which the reporter selected "neurological" as the main category and "awareness/dreaming/nightmares" as a subcategory, those where the narrative report included the word "awareness" and those identified by the authors as possibly relevant to awareness. Sixty-one awareness-related incidents were analysed: 16 were classified as "awareness", 31 were classified as "no awareness but increased risk of awareness" and 14 were classified as "no awareness and no increased risk of awareness". Among 47 incidents in the former two categories, 42 (89%) were associated with low anaesthetic delivery and 24 (51%) were associated with signs of intraoperative wakefulness. Memory of intraoperative events caused significant ongoing distress for five of the 16 awareness patients. Patients continue to be put at risk of awareness by a range of well-described errors (such as syringe swaps) but also by some new errors related to recently introduced anaesthetic equipment, such as electronic anaesthesia workstations.

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  • A cross-sectional overview of the first 4,000 incidents reported to webAIRS, a de-identified web-based anaesthesia incident reporting system in Australia and New Zealand

    Gibbs, NM; Culwick, M; Merry, Alan (2017)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    webAIRS is a web-based de-identified anaesthesia incident reporting system, which was introduced in Australia and New Zealand in September 2009. By July 2016, 4,000 incident reports had been received. The incidents covered a wide range of patient age (90 years), American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and body mass index (50 kg/m2). They occurred across a wide range of anaesthesia techniques and grade of anaesthesia provider, and over a wide range of anaesthetising locations and times of day. In a high proportion the outcome was not benign; about 26% of incidents were associated with patient harm and a further 4% with death. Incidents appeared to be an ever-present risk in anaesthetic practice, with extrapolated estimates exceeding 200 per week across Australia and New Zealand. Independent of outcomes, many anaesthesia incidents were associated with increased use of health resources. The four most common main categories of incident were Respiratory/Airway, Medication, Cardiovascular, and Medical Device/Equipment. Over 50% of incidents were considered preventable. The narratives accompanying each incident provide a rich source of information, which will be analysed in subsequent reports on particular incident types. The summary data in this initial overview are a sober reminder of the prevalence and unpredictability of anaesthesia incidents, and their potential morbidity and mortality. The data justify current efforts to better prevent and manage anaesthesia incidents in Australia and New Zealand, and identify areas in which increased resources or additional initiatives may be required.

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  • Is refractory angina pectoris a form of chronic pain? A comparison of two patient groups receiving spinal cord stimulation therapy

    Pak, Nicholas; Devcich, Daniel; Johnson, Malcolm; Merry, Alan (2014-03-28)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    AIM: To compare psychological and pain-related characteristics of patients with chronic pain and patients with refractory angina pectoris who had been treated with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy. METHOD: Twenty-four patients receiving SCS therapy were interviewed. Four psychological variables were assessed using standardised questionnaires for pain catastrophising, health locus of control, anxiety sensitivity, and self-efficacy. Patients also completed the revised version of the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Short-Form Health Survey, and self-reported measures of global perceived effect, pain, functionality, and satisfaction with SCS therapy. RESULTS: Most patients reported improvements in pain, functionality, and improvement overall. Some health locus of control dimensions were significantly higher for the angina group than the chronic pain group, and chronic angina patients reported significantly lower levels of intermittent pain. Virtually all patients reported being satisfied with SCS therapy. CONCLUSION: Most self-rated psychological and pain-related characteristics were no different between the two groups, which gives some support to the view that refractory angina is a form of chronic pain. The results also add to evidence supporting the use of SCS therapy for refractory angina pectoris; however, differences observed on a few variables may indicate points of focus for the assessment and treatment of such patients.

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  • Brachial Arterial Temperature as an Indicator of Core Temperature: Proof of Concept and Potential Applications

    Pawley, Matthew; Martinsen, P; Mitchell, Simon; Cheeseman, James; Merry, Alan; Willcox, T; Grieve, R; Nand, P; Davies, Elaine; Warman, Guy (2013)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is potential for heat loss and hypothermia during anesthesia and also for hyperthermia if heat conservation and active warming measures are not accurately titrated. Accurate temperature monitoring is particularly important in procedures in which the patient is actively cooled and then rewarmed such as during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB). We simultaneously measured core, nasopharyngeal, and brachial artery temperatures to investigate the last named as a potential peripheral temperature monitoring site. Ten patients undergoing hypothermic CPB were instrumented for simultaneous monitoring of temperatures in the pulmonary artery (PA), aortic arterial inflow (AI), nasopharynx (NP), and brachial artery (BA). Core temperature was defined as PA temperature before and after CPB and the AI temperature during CPB. Mean deviations of BA and NP temperatures from core temperature were calculated for three steady-state periods (before, during, and after CPB). Mean deviation of BA and NP temperatures from AI temperature was also calculated during active rewarming. A total of 1862 measurements were obtained and logged from eight patients. Mean BA and NP deviations from core temperature across the steady-state periods (before, during, and after CBP) were, respectively: .23 ?? .25, ???.26 ?? .3, and ???.09 ?? .05 C (BA), and .11 ?? .19, ???.1 ?? .47, and ???.04 ?? .3 C (NP). During steadystate periods, there was no evidence of a difference between the mean BA and NP deviation. During active rewarming, the mean difference between the BA and AI temperatures was .14 ?? .36 C. During this period, NP temperature lagged behind AI and BA temperatures by up to 41 minutes and was up to 5.3 C lower than BA (mean difference between BA and NP temperatures was 1.22 ?? .58 C). The BA temperature is an adequate surrogate for core temperature. It also accurately tracks the changing AI temperature during rewarming and is therefore potentially useful in detecting a hyperthermic perfusate, which might cause cerebral hyperthermia.

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  • Curtailing the cost of anesthetic drugs: prudent economics or an infringement of clinical autonomy?

    Merry, Alan; Hamblin, R (2015-10)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Safety in medical simulation--overlooked or underappreciated?

    Merry, Alan; Wheeler, DW (2011-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bar codes and the reduction of drug administration error in anesthesia

    Merry, Alan; Webster, Craig (2004)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The relationship of duration of fast to the volume and pH of gastric contents

    Hutchinson, BR; Merry, Alan; Wild, Christopher (1986)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Volume and pH of gastric contents were measured after anaesthetic induction in 99 in-patients undergoing general and vascular surgery scheduled for either morning (50) or afternoon (49) lists. Significantly fewer patients in the morning group had pH values below 2.5. The mean pH value of the morning group was significantly higher than that of the afternoon group. There was a positive correlation between duration of fast and pH (the longer the more alkaline) for the groups combined. No significant relationship could be shown for any factor with volume.

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  • Variables of patient-controlled analgesia

    Merry, Alan; Owen, H; Kluger, MT; Plummer, JL (1991)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Measuring the artieral blood pressure during transport of patients

    Merry, Alan; Kaye, SE; M??ller, CT; McDougall, JM (2007-02-22)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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