21 results for Moore, Antoni, Conference paper

  • Geographical Vector Agent Modelling for Image Classification: Initial Development

    Borna, Kambiz; Sirguey, Pascal; Moore, Antoni (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Our waste our way: a spatial study of household waste management in Betio, Tarawa, Kiribati

    Teburea, Kotee Bauro; Moore, Antoni; Leonard, Greg (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Hotspots of Hector’s Dolphins On the South Coast

    Rodda, Judy; Moore, Antoni (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Flow direction algorithms in a Hierarchical Hexagonal Surface Model

    Wright, Joseph W.; Moore, Antoni; Leonard, Greg (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Visual data mining of generalized and optimized spatiotemporal animal paths

    Moore, Antoni; Rodriguez Recio, Mariano; Rodda, Judy; Watts, Jim; Seddon, Philip (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Spatial aspects of a comparative study of Active Transport to School and Motorized Transport

    Moore, Antoni; Middlemiss, Melanie; Hodge, Claire; Skidmore, Paula; Mandic, Sandra (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • The Use of GIS for Agroecology, Medicinal Flora and Public Access aspects of an iwi-run Farm

    Moore, Antoni; Johnson, Marion; Lord, Janice; Coutts, Sam; Pagan, Mariana; Gbolagun, Jeremiah; Hall, G. Brent (2013)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • The trustree for the visualisation of attribute and spatial uncertainty: usability assessments

    Kardos, Julian; Moore, Antoni; Benwell, George L (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Attribute and spatial uncertainty are defined and put into context for this research. This paper then extends on a research programme which has designed a visualisation of attribute and choropleth spatial uncertainty using the Hexagonal or Rhombus (HoR) hierarchical spatial data structure. Using the spatial data model in this fashion is termed – the trustree. To understand this progression, a brief explanation of this research programmes past history must be covered. The New Zealand 2001 census is used as an exemplarity dataset to express attribute uncertainty and choropleth boundary uncertainty (termed spatial uncertainty). An internet survey was conducted to test the usability of the trustree, which was used as a transparent tessellation overlay and a value-by-area (VBA) display within a population choropleth map. Two other visualisation of attribute uncertainty methods – blinking areas and adjacent value were also incorporated into the survey. Participants were required to rank, from 1 to 6, six grid cells which overlaid the uncertainty visualisations, in order from the most accurate to the most uncertain cell, respectively. These ranking results were correlated with the actual ranks, providing a metric of usability for each visualisation method. The blinking areas method was the most effective, followed by adjacent value, VBA trustree and the transparent HoR trustree. The time taken for a participant to rank each visualisation’s cells was collected – there is an 82% correlation between the time taken and the final usability results obtained.

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  • Digerud online GIS: developing an online community GIS resource in the Frogn municipal district of Norway

    Fritsvold, Tomas; Moore, Antoni; Chong, Albert K; Milosavljevic, Stephan (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    An increasing community demand for accurate, user friendly and easily accessible geographic information has lead to the development of online resources to aid in the decision making process (Craig et al, 2002, Green et al, 2002, Peng et al 2003). These resources such as interactive maps are often used as tools to plan and review imperative and non-imperative requirements of community life. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible to access, retrieve and convert spatial data to an acceptable format for use in an Internet-accessible and community-based geographic information system (GIS) for the settlement of Digerud in Norway. An Internetbased GIS was placed on a university supplied public access server and known subjects with links to the Digerud district were approached and invited to participate in given geographic identification and measurement tasks on the Digerud GIS online applet. Following the completion of the measurement tasks the participants were surveyed in order to assess ease of use and asked to provide comments on their interaction with the program. The outcome of this study demonstrates the feasibility of such a system and that Digerud online GIS has the potential to develop as a tool for the people of the Digerud and neighbouring communities for use as either an imperative (e.g. socio-economic) or non-imperative (e.g. recreational) geographical information package.

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  • Model-based cartographic generalisation with uncertainty

    Moore, Antoni (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The aim of this paper is to outline a proposed project to holistically generalise spatial data using agents. Cartographic generalisation is a process that is fraught with uncertainty – for a particular spatial scale there are an infinite amount of combinations for the display (or non-display) of data in the map space. Each map element (e.g. objects such as roads or buildings can be map elements) is an agent, with the ability to self-diagnose for cartographic conflict and reason with uncertainty (using Dempster-Shafer theory) to choose how to display itself in conjunction with neighbouring objects. Synoptically, a legible map will have been created through the intelligent interaction of agents at the local scale. This paper will explore issues associated with the above process.

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  • A vector-agent paradigm for dynamic urban modelling

    Hammam, Yasser; Moore, Antoni; Whigham, Peter A; Freeman, Claire (2003-12)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    In the past, researchers and model developers were restricted by their theoretical knowledge about the city and how it might be simulated as well as constrained by technological limitations. Nevertheless, the simulation environment is now appropriate for the infusion of new ideas into urban modelling. Urban simulation is a relatively unique modelling problem. The urban systems commonly represented in urban models considering different factors (economic, social, environmental …. etc.) and are notoriously difficult to simulate. It is proposed that agents are more flexible than cellular automata at modelling the city, and in turn that vector-based agents are more suitable than cell-based agents at doing the same. Therefore, this paper is intended to review the limitations raised by using cell-based models with an agent simulation system, and introduce a new paradigm for integrating vector-based spatial model with agent system.

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  • Analysis of distortions in a mental map using GPS and GIS

    Peake, Simon A J; Moore, Antoni (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Mental maps are a cartographic illustration of a person’s internal representation of the spatial environment in which they live. They are often used to provide an insight into how different ethnic or social groups perceive their environment. A new method of measuring the distortions present in mental maps is developed and tested using a global positioning system (GPS) and a geographic information system (GIS). Results suggest distortions are apparent the further away subjects travel from their familiar environment and that there are consistent scales at which mental maps operate.

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  • The visualisation of uncertainty in spatially-referenced attribute data using TRUSTworthy data structures

    Kardos, Julian; Moore, Antoni; Benwell, George L (2003-12)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper presents the use of hierarchical spatial data structures to visualise attribute and spatial uncertainty when using spatial information systems. This is demonstrated using spatially-referenced data from the New Zealand 2001 Census. Firstly, selected current spatial visualisations created to show uncertainty were assessed in an Internet survey, revealing that overall there is not many usable techniques and also users want to see the original information display as well as a display of uncertainty. This forms a background to the other purpose of this paper, to discuss hierarchical tree structures as a potential visualisation-of-uncertainty technique for socioeconomic data. The major question is: can an uncertainty be effectively communicated using data structures whilst simultaneously displaying the attribute information? Two such structures were compared and assessed in another survey: the region quadtree and the Hexagonal or Rhombus (HoR) quadtree, both variable resolution structures. These structures work in the following way: an area where attribute data is uncertain will show less resolution through the data structure than an area that is not, exemplifying a level of detail metaphor. Data structures can disseminate aggregated census data and standardise spatial units, thus reducing subjectiveness in boundary definitions for socioeconomic data. The principles behind possible implementations are presented through a demonstration program, TRUST (The Representation of Uncertainty using Scale-unspecific Tessellations). The results of the second survey revealed that the region quadtree and the HoR quadtree can display uncertainty information to a user, and also that the region quadtree is more visually complicated. The HoR tessellation ranked similar to common visualisation-of-uncertainty techniques like overlay and blinking pixels.

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  • Cubes, shadows and comic strips - a.k.a. interfaces, metaphors and maps?

    Moore, Antoni (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper explores the scope of three specific geovisualisation ideas. a) The Tangible Augmented Street Map (TASM): the use of a paper cube as a tangible augmented reality (AR) interface to a “book” of digital street maps. b) A Shadow Metaphor for Multi-temporal viewsheds: the use of differing transparencies to convey the consecutive viewsheds of points along a route. c) “Cartoography”: regarding the map as a caricature or cartoon of real world features; how far can we take this analogy? The map as comic strip is explored here. These potential areas of research encompass much of the current geovisualisation agenda, as introduced by MacEachren and Kraak (2001). These include interfaces (augmented reality), cognition (use of metaphors, and the assessment of interfaces) and representation (maps as caricatures, viewsheds).

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  • Irregular vector-agent based simulation for land-use modelling

    Hammam, Yasser; Moore, Antoni; Whigham, Peter A; Freeman, Claire (2004-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Urban structures exhibit complex patterns made of heterogeneous and irregular objects. Few works in the computational urban modelling literature have considered and examined the real geometric boundary of the city’s objects. However, most of these works are driven by Cellular Automata (CA) as a spatial modelling vehicle. This model has had success, but also has its limitations regarding the study of urban dynamics in computer simulation. Extensive modification of CA or use of a different modelling paradigm should be considered. We argue here that, representational realism must be achieved in urban complexity. This paper is an attempt to fill this gap to address the rigid structure of CA: we present a novel technique called the “vector-agent based simulation”, which uses discrete irregular objects as an autonomous spatial entity beneath an agent modelling structure. Through computer simulation, this new technique has been applied to von Thunen’s theory of agricultural land use as a hypothetical environment for model verification. The findings demonstrate that our proposal can be a new paradigm for urban simulation

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  • Sport and time geography: a good match?

    Moore, Antoni; Whigham, Peter A; Holt, Alec; Aldridge, Colin H; Hodge, Ken (2003-12)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper proposes using the rich visual “language” of Hägerstrand’s time geography to represent time-space relationships in sport, in particular within the spatial and temporal constraints of a game of rugby. Despite being applied outside of its traditional social context, it is argued that time geography’s ability to model movements and relationships at the individual level makes it (and its modelling constructs such as prisms and lifelines) a powerful visualisation tool able to provide valuable insights into goal-oriented team sport. The visual tools of time geography are shown in the context of a video information system, SCRUM (Spatio-Chronological Rugby Union Model).

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  • Generic vector-agents

    Hammam, Yasser; Moore, Antoni; Whigham, Peter A; Freeman, Claire (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The work reported here has been motivated by the need for a generic spatial model to overcome the limitations of Cellular Automata (CA) regarding the rigid square-cell structure and limited neighbourhood configurations. A novel approach for spatial modelling technique is developed: the “vector-agent” in which the individual entity is represented by their real geometric boundaries (which can change over time) beneath an agent modelling structure. We show in this paper how the theory behind CA and agents can be combined to produce a generic and dynamic agent based on the vector data structure. This new paradigm has extended capabilities over the Geographic Automata (Torrens and Benenson, 2005) in terms of CA disunity and the abstraction of non-fixed-objects. Through computer simulation, different techniques and algorithms have been derived achieving a high degree of representational realism for a variety of phenomena

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  • The storage and reconstruction of polygon boundaries using circles

    Moore, Antoni; Mason, Chris; Whigham, Peter A; Thompson-Fawcett, Michelle (2003-12)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    This paper investigates the accuracy of using circles to store polygon boundaries. Can a series of xy points be accurately replaced by a smaller array of variably-sized circles used in a non space filling sense to approximate to the edge of the polygon? Two measures were used to ascertain this, areal error and visual error. A vector dataset representing the island of Rarotonga was converted from boundary coordinates to circle storage using a Voronoi-based medial axis approach. Three parameters were altered to derive as many as 150 circle-based realisations – minimum allowed circle radius, degree of overlap allowed between circles and Douglas-Peucker algorithm threshold (the latter algorithm of line reduction was used to extract “important” points from the polygon and add them to the circle list as “zero-radius circles”). This presentation presents and analyses the areal error and visual error results for all realisations.

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  • Point allocation inside polygons and GWR: an experimental analysis with survey data

    Francisco, Eduardo de Rezende; Whigham, Peter A; Moore, Antoni (2007-12-06)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    The aim of this paper is to analyse different alternative implementations for a problem defined as "point allocation inside polygons" for Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR). The problem involves situations where the precise location of each observation is not known - just its district, municipality or region, i.e. a polygon geographical location. However, associated data were available that could potentially allows point placement of observations. These analyses were applied in a Income predicting model based on electricity consumption from a survey for a power distribution company in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Completely spatially random allocation and allocations based on spatial distributions of population (universe) and of the independent variable (electricity consumption) were utilized. Results showing the coefficients of determination (R2) suggest that a more realistic measure of the relationship between these two constructs could be evaluated.

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  • Geostatistical modelling, analysis and mapping of epidemiology of Dengue Fever in Johor State, Malaysia

    Seng, Su Bee; Chong, Albert K; Moore, Antoni (2005-11)

    Conference paper
    University of Otago

    Dengue fever, and especially the life-threatening form - DHF is an infectious mosquitoborne disease that places a heavy burden on public health systems in Malaysia as well as on most of the tropical countries around the world. Various environmental factors such as rainfall, temperature, living conditions, demography structure domestic waste management and population distribution are important in determining the mosquito survival and reproduction. A geostatistical modelling, analysis and mapping approach has been utilised in this research to understand the correlation between dengue fever prevalence, population distribution and meteorological factor, and the characteristics of space-time clusters in the Johor State. By supplementing GIS with geostatistical analysis and space-time permutation scan statistic tools, the spatial variation of dengue incidence can be mapped. Geographical weighted regression (GWR) analysis has revealed a strong (R2= 0.87) positive spatial association between dengue fever prevalence and population distribution in the Johor State. The dengue prevalence is expected to be higher in densely populated urban area, such as in Johor Bahru: however, there is a “rule” change in the Johor Bahru sub-district due to the positive impact from a dengue control and prevention programme. GWR analysis has also identified that ten to 14 days of accumulative rainfall is sufficient to support the mosquito breeding cycle and the dengue virus incubation period (vector + host) in the Johor Bahru district is 15 days. Space-time clusters showed that dengue transmission is a contagious type as the spacetime extent is limited at 200m and 20 days and mainly involved household transmission. Results from this study reveal the ability of an augmented GIS surveillance system by incorporating the disease epidemiology and a geostatistical approach to provide reliable information for infectious disease management, control and surveillance. This research is the first study that has utilised GWR in infectious vector-borne disease, especially the attempt to “spatialise” the time in Hypothesis 2. In addition, it is also the first study which makes use of spatial-scan statistic permutation model to study the characteristics of dengue fever space-time clusters.

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