20 results for Nesbit, T., Conference paper

  • NESB students - COPing with BICT: one year on

    Nesbit, T.; McPherson, F. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the success of a special foundation programme that has been completed by some international students as their first semester’s study towards the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies degree at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology. The findings are useful for evaluating the ongoing use of the special foundation programme and will be of use to other members of the NACCQ sector who are using or considering using a similar foundation programme.

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  • Serving up server side programming

    Nesbit, T.; Raizis, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper explores what content should be focussed on in the teaching of a level 7 server side programming course (covering PHP) that is part of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) and the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce (Grad Dip eCommerce) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT). Opinions were sought from members of a variety of PHP user groups about the importance of various topics that could be included in such a course. The project reports of students from both BICT and Grad Dip eCommerce who had completed their major projects using PHP were analysed, to determine which content in the course was the most useful for their projects. The outcome of the research includes some recommendations for increased coverage of some topics in the course under review, and the possibility of changing one of the other courses in the Grad Dip eCommerce from being strongly recommended to being compulsory. The findings of this research will be of use to CPIT and other institutions that are already teaching or are contemplating teaching web-programming courses using PHP at this level.

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  • The development of a graduate diploma in eCommerce

    Nesbit, T. (2003)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 2000 Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) developed a new Graduate Diploma in eCommerce, which has been offered since early 2001. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the curriculum and delivery of the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce prepares its graduates for the “Inter-related Role of the eCommerce Professional” as described by Chan and Swatman (2000) and the multi-disciplinary nature of eCommerce as described by Turban et al (2002). Many tertiary education institutions in the Asia Pacific region have incorporated eCommerce and eBusiness related subjects into their curriculum, with some having created majors or specialisations for existing qualifications, while others have created new qualifications at undergraduate, graduate or post graduate level. The nature and level of many of these new qualifications have been well document by a number of writers including Chan and Swatman (2000b, 2001 and 2002). Chan and Swatman (2000a) in an analysis of the eCommerce/eBusiness job markets developed a model of the “Inter-related Role of the eCommerce Professional”. This model is in affect a three-legged stool made up of Commerce/Business, Electronics and People. A number of other writers also point to eCommerce being multidisciplinary as opposed to being a single discipline in itself, with most writers, including Turban et al. (2002), and Nesbit (2001 and 2002) reaching the point of saying that the underlying disciplines fall into the three categories of business, technology and social sciences. The paper also includes a description of how the qualification is structured into two optional specialisations of Web Programming and eBusiness Strategies and looks at the combination of courses that typical students might complete as part of the qualification.

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  • What do pigs and chickens have to do with eCommerce

    Nesbit, T. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In a world where more organisations are embracing eCommerce or eBusiness or eSomethingelse, there are an increasing number of eFailures as well. This paper looks at what it means to be successful in eCommerce and in particular the management skills that are needed for eCommerce organisations to be innovative and successful. The findings are based on a review of literature and the interview of a senior manager in an eCommerce organisation in New Zealand, and will be able to be used as the basis for a questionnaire to be distributed to a wider sample of organisations. The paper concludes by drawing a parallel between our understanding of the nature of pigs and chickens, and the characteristics of successful eCommerce organisations.

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  • Research cultures under the microscope: three case studies

    Joyce, D.; Bridgeman, N.; Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) offer computing degrees and are under pressure to grow their “research cultures” in order to maintain their degree accreditation. The three authors have experienced this pressure in different ways: as heads of department, programme directors and research co-ordinators. In this paper they attempt to answer five research questions: • what patterns of growth/decay have been observed at three institutions of different sizes? • how has the balance between publication and presentation changed? • how has the balance between national and international changed? • how has the balance between conferences and journals changed? • what are the possible reasons for the observed changes?

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  • The impact of effective IT systems management on end-user productivity: IT academics have their say

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines the use of technology partnership agreements (TPAs) and service level agreements (SLAs) for the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, from the perspective of a group of academics involved in the teaching of information and communication technology (ICT) in the Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) sector in New Zealand. Also examined in the paper are the use of cost centres and profit centres for measuring the financial performance of internal IT departments. This paper is part of ongoing research into the management of the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, with future research likely to include the perspectives of a wide grouping of those in IT management roles in the public sector; a group of people in IT management roles in the ITP and wider tertiary education sector; those teaching in non-ICT subject areas in the ITP sector and a cross section of practitioners in the IT Industry.

    View record details
  • eLearning deployment: knowing your context

    Martin, A.; Nesbit, T. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines concepts from the Knowledge Management (KM) domain and looks at how they can be applied in an eLearning setting. Particular attention is paid to the notion of context as it is defined in the KM body of literature and how it was applied in the development of eLearning content for courses from the Certificate in Computing (CIC).

    View record details
  • NESB students - COPing with BICT

    Nesbit, T.; Isitt, S. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As increasing numbers of Non English Speaking Background (NESB) students apply to enrol in information and communication technology (ICT) degree programmes in New Zealand, there are many issues that are arising relating to the entry requirements for these students. Many students far exceed the academic entry requirements, and narrowly fail to meet the English language requirements for entry but could well be capable of success, whereas other students who only just meet both the academic and English language requirements may have low rates of success. This paper describes how Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) introduced a Foundation Programme for NESB students who meet the academic entry requirements for the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) degree, but narrowly miss the English language entry requirements, in such a way that still allows the students to complete the BICT degree in 3 years. The success rates of the first group of students to complete this foundation programme as they move further into the BICT degree point to this move being a successful one. The results of this research will be of significant use to CPIT and other institutions looking for alternative pathways into their degree programmes for NESB students.

    View record details
  • The case for a national degree: if not why not and what next?

    Corich, S.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper revisits the case for a national computing degree and attempts to identify a way forward that might prove acceptable to all the institutes aligning themselves with the national Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The concept of a national computing degree has been around for some time and has been an issue for debate among NACCQ membership since shortly after the introduction of the National Diploma in Business Computing in 1986. Until now, the reaction of member institutes to a national computing degree concept has ranged from warm enthusiasm to disinterested observer. This paper outlines previous efforts made to gain support for a national degree concept and investigates the perceived barriers to the adoption of such a proposal from the point of view of academic management and computing practitioners. The paper investigates a number of options, which focus on first year degree study activities, and that could prove acceptable to most interested parties. These options include identification and delivery of common core papers and the introduction of an “Advanced Standing” concept where institutes recognise a body work as being equivalent to first year degree study without the need for formal cross crediting. The paper aims at identifying an approach that will address the concerns of member institutes and provide a pathway for students that is accepted by the majority of institutes.

    View record details
  • Where did the b……. go and is it still important?

    Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At the annual conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2001, it was decided to remove a word that began with “B” from the names of the level 5 and 6 qualifications that are part of the NACCQ family of qualifications. These qualifications were restructured for the 1992-year into an 18-module qualification structure. In the years since then, the number of modules being taught that relate to the same “B” word have reduced in proportion to the total number that are being taught. This paper describes the extent to which the decline in teaching modules related to the “B” word has actually happened; develops a hypothesis as to why this happened; and asks the question as to whether employers of graduates from these qualifications now place less importance on knowledge and skills related to the “B” word.

    View record details
  • NESB students - COPing with BICT: one year on

    Nesbit, T.; McPherson, F. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the success of a special foundation programme that has been completed by some international students as their first semester’s study towards the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies degree at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology. The findings are useful for evaluating the ongoing use of the special foundation programme and will be of use to other members of the NACCQ sector who are using or considering using a similar foundation programme.

    View record details
  • Serving up server side programming

    Nesbit, T.; Raizis, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper explores what content should be focussed on in the teaching of a level 7 server side programming course (covering PHP) that is part of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) and the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce (Grad Dip eCommerce) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT). Opinions were sought from members of a variety of PHP user groups about the importance of various topics that could be included in such a course. The project reports of students from both BICT and Grad Dip eCommerce who had completed their major projects using PHP were analysed, to determine which content in the course was the most useful for their projects. The outcome of the research includes some recommendations for increased coverage of some topics in the course under review, and the possibility of changing one of the other courses in the Grad Dip eCommerce from being strongly recommended to being compulsory. The findings of this research will be of use to CPIT and other institutions that are already teaching or are contemplating teaching web-programming courses using PHP at this level.

    View record details
  • What do pigs and chickens have to do with eCommerce

    Nesbit, T. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In a world where more organisations are embracing eCommerce or eBusiness or eSomethingelse, there are an increasing number of eFailures as well. This paper looks at what it means to be successful in eCommerce and in particular the management skills that are needed for eCommerce organisations to be innovative and successful. The findings are based on a review of literature and the interview of a senior manager in an eCommerce organisation in New Zealand, and will be able to be used as the basis for a questionnaire to be distributed to a wider sample of organisations. The paper concludes by drawing a parallel between our understanding of the nature of pigs and chickens, and the characteristics of successful eCommerce organisations.

    View record details
  • The development of a graduate diploma in eCommerce

    Nesbit, T. (2003)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 2000 Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) developed a new Graduate Diploma in eCommerce, which has been offered since early 2001. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the curriculum and delivery of the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce prepares its graduates for the “Inter-related Role of the eCommerce Professional” as described by Chan and Swatman (2000) and the multi-disciplinary nature of eCommerce as described by Turban et al (2002). Many tertiary education institutions in the Asia Pacific region have incorporated eCommerce and eBusiness related subjects into their curriculum, with some having created majors or specialisations for existing qualifications, while others have created new qualifications at undergraduate, graduate or post graduate level. The nature and level of many of these new qualifications have been well document by a number of writers including Chan and Swatman (2000b, 2001 and 2002). Chan and Swatman (2000a) in an analysis of the eCommerce/eBusiness job markets developed a model of the “Inter-related Role of the eCommerce Professional”. This model is in affect a three-legged stool made up of Commerce/Business, Electronics and People. A number of other writers also point to eCommerce being multidisciplinary as opposed to being a single discipline in itself, with most writers, including Turban et al. (2002), and Nesbit (2001 and 2002) reaching the point of saying that the underlying disciplines fall into the three categories of business, technology and social sciences. The paper also includes a description of how the qualification is structured into two optional specialisations of Web Programming and eBusiness Strategies and looks at the combination of courses that typical students might complete as part of the qualification.

    View record details
  • Research cultures under the microscope: three case studies

    Joyce, D.; Bridgeman, N.; Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) offer computing degrees and are under pressure to grow their “research cultures” in order to maintain their degree accreditation. The three authors have experienced this pressure in different ways: as heads of department, programme directors and research co-ordinators. In this paper they attempt to answer five research questions: • what patterns of growth/decay have been observed at three institutions of different sizes? • how has the balance between publication and presentation changed? • how has the balance between national and international changed? • how has the balance between conferences and journals changed? • what are the possible reasons for the observed changes?

    View record details
  • eLearning deployment: knowing your context

    Martin, A.; Nesbit, T. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines concepts from the Knowledge Management (KM) domain and looks at how they can be applied in an eLearning setting. Particular attention is paid to the notion of context as it is defined in the KM body of literature and how it was applied in the development of eLearning content for courses from the Certificate in Computing (CIC).

    View record details
  • The impact of effective IT systems management on end-user productivity: IT academics have their say

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper examines the use of technology partnership agreements (TPAs) and service level agreements (SLAs) for the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, from the perspective of a group of academics involved in the teaching of information and communication technology (ICT) in the Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) sector in New Zealand. Also examined in the paper are the use of cost centres and profit centres for measuring the financial performance of internal IT departments. This paper is part of ongoing research into the management of the provision of IT services by internal IT departments, with future research likely to include the perspectives of a wide grouping of those in IT management roles in the public sector; a group of people in IT management roles in the ITP and wider tertiary education sector; those teaching in non-ICT subject areas in the ITP sector and a cross section of practitioners in the IT Industry.

    View record details
  • The case for a national degree: if not why not and what next?

    Corich, S.; Nesbit, T. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper revisits the case for a national computing degree and attempts to identify a way forward that might prove acceptable to all the institutes aligning themselves with the national Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ). The concept of a national computing degree has been around for some time and has been an issue for debate among NACCQ membership since shortly after the introduction of the National Diploma in Business Computing in 1986. Until now, the reaction of member institutes to a national computing degree concept has ranged from warm enthusiasm to disinterested observer. This paper outlines previous efforts made to gain support for a national degree concept and investigates the perceived barriers to the adoption of such a proposal from the point of view of academic management and computing practitioners. The paper investigates a number of options, which focus on first year degree study activities, and that could prove acceptable to most interested parties. These options include identification and delivery of common core papers and the introduction of an “Advanced Standing” concept where institutes recognise a body work as being equivalent to first year degree study without the need for formal cross crediting. The paper aims at identifying an approach that will address the concerns of member institutes and provide a pathway for students that is accepted by the majority of institutes.

    View record details
  • Where did the b……. go and is it still important?

    Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At the annual conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2001, it was decided to remove a word that began with “B” from the names of the level 5 and 6 qualifications that are part of the NACCQ family of qualifications. These qualifications were restructured for the 1992-year into an 18-module qualification structure. In the years since then, the number of modules being taught that relate to the same “B” word have reduced in proportion to the total number that are being taught. This paper describes the extent to which the decline in teaching modules related to the “B” word has actually happened; develops a hypothesis as to why this happened; and asks the question as to whether employers of graduates from these qualifications now place less importance on knowledge and skills related to the “B” word.

    View record details
  • NESB students - COPing with BICT

    Nesbit, T.; Isitt, S. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As increasing numbers of Non English Speaking Background (NESB) students apply to enrol in information and communication technology (ICT) degree programmes in New Zealand, there are many issues that are arising relating to the entry requirements for these students. Many students far exceed the academic entry requirements, and narrowly fail to meet the English language requirements for entry but could well be capable of success, whereas other students who only just meet both the academic and English language requirements may have low rates of success. This paper describes how Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) introduced a Foundation Programme for NESB students who meet the academic entry requirements for the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) degree, but narrowly miss the English language entry requirements, in such a way that still allows the students to complete the BICT degree in 3 years. The success rates of the first group of students to complete this foundation programme as they move further into the BICT degree point to this move being a successful one. The results of this research will be of significant use to CPIT and other institutions looking for alternative pathways into their degree programmes for NESB students.

    View record details