7 results for Noble, J, Conference item, 2010

  • Qualitas Corpus: A Curated Collection of Java Code for Empirical Studies

    Tempero, E; Anslow, C; Dietrich, J; Han, T; Li, J; Lumpe, M; Melton, H; Noble, J (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to increase our ability to use measurement to support software development practise we need to do more analysis of code. However, empirical studies of code are expensive and their results are difficult to compare. We describe the Qualitas Corpus, a large curated collection of open source Java systems. The corpus reduces the cost of performing large empirical studies of code and supports comparison of measurements of the same artifacts. We discuss its design, organisation, and issues associated with its development.

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  • How much is just enough? Some documentation patterns on Agile projects

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Agile methods advocate "just enough" documentation on Agile projects. Unfortunately, there are no clear guidelines on what is "just enough" documentation. We describe a set of patterns to help Agile software development teams define "just enough" in their own contexts. Teams can also employ these documentation patterns as strategies to overcome common challenges of adopting Agile methods.

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  • Using Grounded Theory to study the human aspects of Software Engineering

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Grounded Theory (GT) is increasingly being used to study the human aspects of Software Engineering. Unfortunately, the Grounded Theory method is still not widely understood in the Software Engineering discipline. We present an overview of the Grounded Theory method and discuss its use.

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  • Agility in Context

    Hoda, Rashina; Kruchten, P; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010-10)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Evangelists for Agile methods strongly encourage all projects to follow every practice of their chosen method. Based on a Grounded Theory study involving 40 participants at 16 organizations, and corroborated by 4 independent case studies, we argue that development methods and practices must be adapted to ???t their contexts. Understanding Agility in context will help development teams, their managers, and Agile coaches to adapt development processes to ???t their projects??? contexts.

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  • Agile undercover: When customers don't collaborate

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Customer collaboration is vital to Agile projects. Through a Grounded Theory study of New Zealand and Indian Agile teams we discovered that lack of customer involvement was causing problems in gathering and clarifying requirements, loss of productivity, and business loss. ???Agile Undercover??? allows development teams to practice Agile despite insufficient or ineffective customer involvement. We present the causes and consequences of lack of customer involvement on Agile projects and describe the Agile Undercover strategies used to overcome them.

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  • Balancing acts: Walking the Agile tightrope

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Self-organizing teams are one of the critical success factors on Agile projects - and yet, little is known about the self-organizing nature of Agile teams and the challenges they face in industrial practice. Based on a Grounded Theory study of 40 Agile practitioners across 16 software development organizations in New Zealand and India, we describe how self-organizing Agile teams perform balancing acts between (a) freedom and responsibility (b) cross-functionality and specialization, and (c) continuous learning and iteration pressure, in an effort to maintain their self-organizing nature. We discuss the relationship between these three balancing acts and the fundamental conditions of self-organizing teams - autonomy, cross-fertilization, and self-transcendence.

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  • Organizing self-organizing teams

    Hoda, Rashina; Noble, J; Marshall, S (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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