91 results for Oben, Glenda, Report

  • Child Poverty Monitor: Technical Report 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-12-13)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The Child Poverty Monitor and this Technical Report provide data on a set of indicators that assess aspects of child poverty in New Zealand and their implications for child wellbeing. In it are data on income and non-income measures of poverty, including measures that reflect increasing levels of severity. Other data include indicators related to health, living conditions, education, and a selection of economic measures used to assess how well we are doing as a nation that are relevant to the wellbeing of children and their families. The Child Poverty Monitor is a partnership comprising the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, the University of Otago’s New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service (NZCYES) and the JR McKenzie Trust. The purpose is to compile and share robust information on child poverty measures that are publicly available and easily accessible. Only by having the essential measures on child poverty in New Zealand compiled, published and disseminated annually can we tell how well we are progressing in effectively reducing child poverty in our nation.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Canterbury and the West Coast 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in MidCentral and Whanganui 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hutt Valley, Capital & Coast and Wairarapa DHBs 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the South Island 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern District Health Board 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Northern District Health Boards 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Midland Region 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • Te Ohonga Ake The Health Status of Māori Children and Young People in New Zealand Series Two

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-04)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections:  Issues in infancy  Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds  Conditions of the respiratory system  Common communicable diseases  Unintentional injury  Reproductive health  Mental health

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  • The Health Status of Pacific Children and Young People in New Zealand 2015

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Pierson, Melanie; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Despite some recent improvements, Pacific peoples in New Zealand continue to experience greater disadvantage across a range of socioeconomic indicators. Improving incomes, education, employment and housing is critical to improving health outcomes. The report aims to provide an overview of the health status of Pacific children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to use collated recent data when they are developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health needs. Within each section data are provided for Pacific children and young people aged 0–24 years with comparative national data for selected indicators. This report provides an overview of the health status of Pacific children and young people in New Zealand to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic way. The Ministry of Health, district health boards, Pacific health providers and others working in the health sector may use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Counties Manukau (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Capital and Coast DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Canterbury and the West Coast (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Hutt Valley DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Midcentral DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Lakes DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details