92 results for Oben, Glenda, Report

  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand (2013)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2013-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report collates a range of routinely collected data sources with a view to: 1. Estimating the prevalence of conditions arising in the perinatal period (e.g. preterm births, congenital and chromosomal anomalies) which may lead to greater health and disability support service demand during childhood and adolescence. 2. Identifying the numbers of children and young people with specific chronic conditions and disabilities, who are accessing secondary healthcare services. 3. Reviewing the distribution of overweight and obesity and its determinants (nutrition, physical activity) in children and young people. Sections in the report include: • Conditions Arising in the Perinatal Period • Other disabilities • Chronic Medical Conditions • Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity • Children of Parents with Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Addictions (COPMIA) In depth topics conducted in this report are: • The Determinants and Consequences of Overweight and Obesity: • The Treatment of Obesity in Children and Adolescents: This in depth topic provides information on evidence-based interventions for the treatment of obesity in children. • Children of Parents with Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Addictions (COPMIA)

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Adams, Judith; Reddington, Anne; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew (2011-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Children and young people with disabilities and chronic require a range of health and disability support services in order to reach their potential, and it is undesirable that a paucity of data should preclude them featuring in prioritisation, planning and resource allocation decisions. This report reviews a range of routinely collected hospital admission, mortality and survey data, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing secondary health services in New Zealand. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‘s in-depth topics consider common issues faced by the families of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, and their implications for health and disability support services. Specifically, the issues considered in these topics are: 1. Disability, Disability Support Services and Transitions to Adult Care: This topic provides a brief overview of disability, disability support services and issues with transition to adult care. It begins by briefly defining disability, before reviewing the most common conditions leading to disabilities in New Zealand children and young people. New Zealand‘s historical approaches to service delivery for those with disabilities are then reviewed, before an overview is provided of New Zealand‘s current disability support services, and the areas of unmet need most commonly identified by families caring for children and young people with disabilities, both in New Zealand and overseas. A final section considers the transition of young people with disabilities from paediatric to adult care, some of the difficulties inherent with this transition, and a range of overseas models which consider how such transitions might be improved. 2. Models of Care for Medically Fragile Children: Medical advances over recent decades have resulted in an increase in the number of medically fragile or technology-dependent. This, in combination with advances in portable technology and a trend for shorter hospital stays and less institutional care has meant that there are increasing numbers of children with complex health care needs living at home. This review examines the funding supports available, some of the inherent problems that arise from caring for medically fragile children at home, and some models of care. The section concludes with a review of transitions from paediatric to adult services for adolescents with chronic medical conditions.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in New Zealand (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2013-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in New Zealand (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • Te Ohonga Ake The Health of Māori Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Adams, Judith; Reddington, Anne; Oben, Glenda; Simpson, Jean; Wicken, Andrew (2012-03)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report on the health of Māori children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities is divided into two main parts. Part 1: Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities aims to: 1. Review the secondary health service utilisation patterns of Māori children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, using hospital admission data. 2. Review the distribution of, and risk factors for, overweight and obesity in Māori children using available national survey data. 3. Explore the prevalence of congenital anomalies evident at birth in Māori babies, and consider in more detail, those anomalies which are likely to lead to long term disability. Part 2: The New Zealand Children’s Social Health Monitor then considers how Māori children are faring during the current economic downturn. The structure of this report is based on an Indicator Framework developed by the New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service. Part 1 begins with a Viewpoint by Dr Jo Baxter, which reflects on the implications of the report’s findings as they relate to Māori children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. Four sub-sections then consider specific child and youth health issues in more detail, with information being presented in the following order: • Chronic Medical Conditions • Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity • Conditions Which May be Detected by Antenatal and Neonatal Screening • Other Disabilities In Part 2, data on each of the indicators in the New Zealand Children’s Health Monitor is presented, with a view to reviewing how Māori children are faring in the current economic climate.

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  • Te Ohonga Ake The Health Status of Māori Children and Young People in New Zealand

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework common to all New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service reports. The report is presented as reference manual, which is divided into three main sections: • Issues More Common in Infants • Issues More Common in Children or Common in Children and Young People • Issues More Common in Young People For each indicator a “snapshot” of the most recent 5 years of data (hospital admissions 2006–2010; mortality 2004–2008) is provided, which compares rates for Māori children and young people with those of non-Māori non-Pacific children and young people.

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  • The Health of Pacific Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Adams, Judith; Reddington, Anne; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew (2011-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected hospital admission, mortality and survey data, with a view to identifying the number of Pacific children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing healthcare services in New Zealand. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service’s (NZCYES) first three years of District Health Board (DHB) reporting. Each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four main sections: • Conditions Detectable by Antenatal and Neonatal Screening • Other Disabilities • Other Chronic Medical Conditions • Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity

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  • Te Ohonga Ake The Determinants of Health for Māori Children and Young People in New Zealand

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2013-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework common to all New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service reports. The report sits alongside a report focused on the total population, and entitled The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in New Zealand. Each section in the total population report concludes with a brief overview of local policy documents and evidence-based reviews that consider population-level approaches to prevention or management. At the end of each chapter of this report, the authors have summarised the relevant findings from the total population report. In exploring the underlying determinant of health for Māori children and young people, each of the indicators in this year’s report has been assigned to one of four sections: • The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context • Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants • Risk and Protective Factors • Health Outcomes as Determinants

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  • The Determinants of Health for Pacific Children and Young People in New Zealand (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2013-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework common to all New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service reports, and sit alongside a total population report entitled The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in New Zealand. Each section in this companion report concludes with a brief overview of local policy documents and evidence-based reviews which consider population level approaches to prevention or management. Such overviews are useful for those contemplating the next steps in addressing the issues reviewed. In exploring the underlying determinants of health for Pacific children and young people, each of the indicators in this year’s report has been assigned to one of four sections: • The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context • Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants • Risk and Protective Factors • Health Outcomes as Determinants

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  • The Health Status of Pacific Children and Young People in New Zealand (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of Pacific children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve Pacific child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address the health needs of Pacific children and young people. Each of the indicators in this year’s report has been assigned to one of three main sections as follows: • Issues More Common in Infancy • Issues More Common in Children, or Common in both Children and Young People • Issues More Common in Young People

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  • Child Poverty Monitor 2014

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Adams, Judith; Reddington, Anne; Duncanson, Mavis (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This Report provides data and technical information on child poverty measures, economic indicators, and child health measures. It builds on the information previously reported in the Children’s Social Health Monitor, thereby providing consistently in these measures. The child poverty measures in this report examine aspects of income poverty, material hardship, and severity and persistence of child poverty. For these measures, we rely heavily on data available in the Ministry of Social Development report Household Incomes in New Zealand: Trends in Indicators of Inequality and Hardship 1982 to 2013. Data are also provided on a few indicators that have economic implications for child poverty: income inequality, unemployment, GDP and reliance on benefits. A new set of measures included in this Technical Report relates to housing. Household crowding and housing costs are highly relevant to child poverty. Data for these indicators have been drawn from the 2001, 2006 and 2013 Censuses and Household Incomes in New Zealand: Trends in Indicators of Inequality and Hardship 1982 to 2013. The health and wellbeing indicators look at hospital admissions and deaths from conditions associated with child poverty, including some infectious and respiratory diseases and injuries; the assault, neglect and maltreatment of children; and infant mortality. For each indicator, there are large disparities for children related to socioeconomic status and ethnicity. Monitoring these health indicators is entirely appropriate, as they are the early signs of the consequences of children living in poverty. Over time, we will look to include additional indicators of child poverty, related to issues such as education, social inclusion, disability and quality of life.

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  • Child Poverty Monitor 2013

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Oben, Glenda; Simpson, Jean (2013-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This Technical Report marks a new step in monitoring child poverty and social health indicators in New Zealand. It began with a partnership being established between the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, the University of Otago’s New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service (NZCYES) and the J R McKenzie Trust. This partnership saw a gap in publicly-available child poverty measures, and is addressing this gap by compiling, publishing and disseminating annual measurements on child poverty in New Zealand. This Report provides data and technical information on child poverty measures, economic indicators, and child health measures. It builds on the information in previous Children’s Social Health Monitor updates, so that the same data is still compiled and reported consistently. This Technical Report, however, adds new dimensions around child poverty measures. The child poverty measures included align closely to the recommendation of the EAG to have a suite of measures to capture different aspects of child poverty. We have included measures on income poverty, material hardship, severity and persistence of child poverty. For these elements, we rely heavily on data available in the Ministry of Social Development report Household Incomes in New Zealand: Trends in Indicators of Inequality and Hardship 1982 to 2012.

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  • Child Poverty Monitor 2015

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Pierson, Melanie (2015-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The Child Poverty Monitor and this Technical Report provide data on a set of indicators that assess aspects of child poverty in New Zealand and their implications for child wellbeing. In it are data on income and non-income measures of poverty, including measures that reflect increasing levels of severity. Other data include indicators related to health, living conditions, education, and a selection of economic measures used to assess how well we are doing as a nation that are relevant to the wellbeing of children and their families. The Child Poverty Monitor is a partnership comprising the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, the University of Otago’s New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service (NZCYES) and the J R McKenzie Trust. The purpose is to compile and share robust information on child poverty measures that are publicly available and easily accessible. Only by having the essential measures on child poverty in New Zealand compiled, published and disseminated annually can we tell how well we are progressing in effectively reducing child poverty in our nation.

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  • Te Ohonga Ake The Health of Māori Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand Series Two

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2014-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The report’s focus on disability, chronic disease and overweight and obesity encompasses health issues and conditions impacting on many Māori babies, tamariki and rangatahi. In addition, these conditions often have a broader impact on education, on whānau and across the life course. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed by the New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service, with all of the indicators in the Chronic Conditions and Disabilities stream being updated in this year’s edition. These indicators have been grouped into four sections: • Conditions Arising in the Perinatal Period • Other Disabilities • Chronic Medical Conditions • Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity

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  • Child Poverty Monitor: Technical Report 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-12-13)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The Child Poverty Monitor and this Technical Report provide data on a set of indicators that assess aspects of child poverty in New Zealand and their implications for child wellbeing. In it are data on income and non-income measures of poverty, including measures that reflect increasing levels of severity. Other data include indicators related to health, living conditions, education, and a selection of economic measures used to assess how well we are doing as a nation that are relevant to the wellbeing of children and their families. The Child Poverty Monitor is a partnership comprising the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, the University of Otago’s New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service (NZCYES) and the JR McKenzie Trust. The purpose is to compile and share robust information on child poverty measures that are publicly available and easily accessible. Only by having the essential measures on child poverty in New Zealand compiled, published and disseminated annually can we tell how well we are progressing in effectively reducing child poverty in our nation.

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  • Te Ohonga Ake The Determinants of Health for Māori Children and Young People in New Zealand Series Two

    Simpson, Jean; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis (2016-03)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for Māori children and young people, aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in addressing many of the determinants of health including child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes related to these determinants. In exploring the underlying determinant of health for Māori children and young people, each of the indicators in this year’s report has been assigned to one of four sections: • The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context • Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants • Risk and Protective Factors • Health Outcomes as Determinants A viewpoint by Dr Bridget Robson beginning on page 32 reflects on the findings of the report in the context of Māori economic values

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern District Health Board 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Midland Region 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in MidCentral and Whanganui 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

    View record details