7 results for Pacheco, GA

  • Levers of job satisfaction: participative decision making and individual characteristics

    Pacheco, GA; webber, D (2011-09-01)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper demonstrates that the determinants of job satisfaction do not change if the worker has decision making freedom and that the impact of some individual characteristics on job satisfaction follow interesting patterns as we move through occupational statuses.

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  • Quitting behaviour in good (and bad) work places

    Markey, R; Pacheco, GA; Ravenswood, K; Webber, DJ (2011-09-01)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper argues that the decision to quit is strongly influenced by employee perceptions of the quality of the work environment (QWE), and that ignoring QWE can lead to incorrect conclusions concerning the influence of other factors on the quitting decision. However, our empirical results also illustrate that some of the antecedents of quitting, namely high levels of stress, gaining information about important decisions and changes, and changes in job satisfaction, are only significant if the overall QWE is perceived to be good; if the QWE is perceived to be bad then these factors appear to have no significant influence on the quitting intention of the worker. This paper contributes to the literature through a work environment approach to understanding the complexities of the quitting decision.

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  • Estimating the cost of youth disengagement in Auckland

    Pacheco, GA; Dye, J (2013-05-29)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    There has been growing interest in recent years in the labour market issues that youth face. Youth exclusion, disengagement, and overall underutilisation in the labour market has short term costs to the economy, as well as long term impacts on society. The consequences range from reduced economic productivity to increased criminal activity. We document a rise in the number of NZ youth classified as not in employment, education or training (i.e. NEET). This trend signals increasing difficulties for young people making the transition from education into the labour market. In this report we project the loss to productivity, measured in foregone wages, and the expected cost to public finances for Auckland and NZ NEET as at December 2012. We focus on youth aged 15-24 years, and where data are available report separately for 15-19 and 20-24 year olds. We find the expected per capita cost of each NEET youth aged 15-24 in the Auckland cohort to be approximately $28,981 over the next 1-3 years. The estimated cost is slightly higher than comparable costs for the aggregate group of NZ NEET, due largely to the higher foregone wages of Auckland NEET. Disaggregating our analysis by ethnicity, we find that Auckland NEET youth of Maori and Pacifica descent are associated with a relatively high per capita cost at roughly $33,634 and $26,629 respectively, compared to the analogous figure for their NZ European counterparts of $22,301 (all figures represent the estimated cost over the next 1-3 years). It appears that the difference is a result of the greater propensity of Maori and Pacific Peoples to disengage from the education system earlier, to withdraw from the work force due to caregiving responsibilities at a younger age, and to experience longer durations of unemployment than their NZ European counterparts. The sizeable estimated costs associated with NEET youth highlight the urgent need for policy intervention directed at improving transitions from NEET status to the workforce or further education / training. It should also be noted that these estimated costs are conservative in nature, and do not include expected costs that are difficult to quantify or attribute proportionally to NEET versus non-NEET status, e.g. impact on criminal activity, depression, substance abuse, psychological distress, etc.

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  • Extrinsic versus intrinsic motivation: does major choice make a difference?

    Hedges, M; Pacheco, GA; Webber, D (2013-09-17)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Prior literature emphasises supply side issues concerning the modularisation of university programmes such as curricula issues and enhanced learning opportunities. Comparatively little is known about the demand side, such as why students choose specific modules. This article presents an investigation that was specifically designed to improve understanding of the factors that contribute to student module choices and draws on a large primary dataset comprised of students following a wide range of majors at a new university business school. The dataset allows for differences between the relative importance of extrinsic and intrinsic motivations between majors to be identified and some implications of this to be discussed.

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  • Demand in New Zealand hospitals: expect the unexpected?

    Jiang, N; Pacheco, GA (2013-09-17)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The health care sector in New Zealand has undergone substantial structural reform since 1983, and stands out relative to other OECD countries, in that it has a relatively low per capita health expenditure, and a high share of public funding. Efficient allocation of resources to accommodate local needs in this community-oriented and public dominant model of the health care system is paramount. This paper employs the National Minimum Dataset from 2007 to 2011 to construct an empirical model aimed at predicting hospital demand. We formulate an easy to implement approach that can be used at the national level, as well as for individual District Health Boards (DHBs) that are regionally defined, and can also be disaggregated by category of patient, e.g. acute care versus elective admissions. We find the use of lagged information in this model to be vital, and by contrasting expected and actual demand, we then evaluate variations in excess demand. We find evidence that suggests in low risk elective cases, unexpected demand significantly reduces an individual’s hospital stay, and increases the likelihood of acute readmission in 30 days. Additionally, the cumulative evidence presented points to excess demand at both the hospital level and within-disease chapter, resulting in more attention paid to high risk patients, to the detriment of low risk cases. The negatively and significant association between hospital stay and readmission in 30 days for low risk cases may prompt policy makers to consider a ‘reduction in readmission program’ for New Zealand.

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  • What determines students’ choices of elective modules?

    Hedges, M; Pacheco, GA; Webber, D (2013-09-17)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Prior literature emphasises supply side issues concerning the modularisation of university programmes such as curricula issues and enhanced learning opportunities. Comparatively little is known about the demand side, such as why students choose specific modules. This article presents an investigation that was specifically designed to improve understanding of the factors that contribute to student module choices and draws on a large primary dataset comprised of students following a wide range of majors at a new university business school.

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  • Pre & Post natal drivers of childhood intelligence: evidence from Singapore

    Hedges, Mary; Morton, SM; Pacheco, GA; Schilling, C (2011-04)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this study, we seek to investigate what influences children’s intelligence in early childhood. The Singapore Cohort Study of the Risk Factors of Myopia (SCORM) is used in to assess determinants of childhood IQ and changes in IQ. This longitudinal data set, collected from 1999, includes a wealth of demographic, socioeconomic, and prenatal characteristics. The richness of the data allows us to employ various econometric approaches including the use of ordered and multinomial logit analysis. We find mother’s education to be a consistent and key determinant of childhood IQ. We also find that father’s education and school quality are key drivers for increasing IQ levels above the average sample movement.

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