9 results for Pack, Margaret

  • "Back From the Edge of the World": Re-Authoring a Story of Practice with Stress and Trauma Using Gestalt Theories and Narrative Approaches

    Pack, Margaret (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The aim of this article is to offer an ongoing reflection of the difficulties of working with trauma survivors within mental health agencies which provide brief models of intervention. The dilemma of how to work safely, respectively, and collaboratively with clients who present with a history of trauma is highlighted. The author reflects on her own experience of vicarious traumatization through her practice with a long-term survivor of domestic abuse. The team and organizational narratives which are embedded in the medical and managerial models in the mental health services are reflected upon as constraining the environment in which the author is able to provide a context for the client's healing and collegial practice. By witnessing the abuse survivor's story of survival drawing upon themes in the "New Trauma Therapy," Gestalt and Narrative therapy practice frameworks, the author suggests that other versions of the "story" are made available for the client and for the worker that offer a greater sense of "personal agency." These "re-authored" narratives offer a way forward for the client, individual worker, and team.

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  • Social Work (Adult)

    Pack, Margaret (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The context of social work practice in Aotearoa, New Zealand (NZ) acknowledges Maori (Maori is a term which refers to a New Zealander who is indigenous to New Zealand) directly as Tangata Whenua ('the people of the land'). Social workers explictly aim to work in partnership with Maori in their practice. Pakeha are considered by Maori as Manuhiri or 'visitors' to Aotearoa NZ due to their colonial origins as settlers to New Zealand from the 1830s onwards. (Pakeha is a term that refers to a New Zealander of European descent). The social worker's role is to practice in a way that aims to achieve social justice for Maori at both a structural and individual level in line with the spirit of the Treaty of Waitangi and the underlying principles of protection, partnership, participation and self-determination. Social work in Aotearoa NZ is seen as being concerned with affirming all aspects of the person so a holistic approach is brought to social work tasks within a variety of organisational settings in public health and social care. Evidence based research is considered useful in mental health social work in Aotearoa, NZ when it attends to holism and the individual in the context of their total environments, including the social, cultural and spiritual dimensions.

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  • Supervision as a Liminal Space: Towards a Dialogic Relationship

    Pack, Margaret (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This article explores the underlying power dynamics and themes in the relationship between the supervisor and supervisee and the challenges these pose for establishing clinical supervision as a dialogic relationship based in Gestalt therapy principles. Illustrated by two examples from a supervisee perspective, themes of 'shame' and the need to attend holistically to the supervisee in their work and personal contexts in the 'here and now' are explored. These examples are discussed in relation to principles of contact, figure and ground, and the polarity of isolation and confluence. Clinical supervisors have an obligation to ensure that the supervisee practises in a way that is 'safe' for the client, themselves and for their employing agencies or professional associations. Supervisors have a further obligation to remain in relationship with the supervisee, as they are engaged in these complex and challenging discussions. The more recent development in the discourse about clinical supervision is the relational emphasis which is discussed in Gestalt therapy (Clarkson & Aviram, 1995; Hycner, & Jacobs, 1995) and applications of concepts such as 'creative adjustment' to clinical supervision (Yontef, 1996). This view enables clinical supervision to be considered as occurring in a liminal space or 'creative void' where learning occurs based in who the supervisee is in the present. Such a view of clinical supervision honours the quality of process and the personhood of the supervisor and supervisee within the inevitable tensions.

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  • An Innovation in Primary Mental Health Care: The Mid Valley Well-Being Service

    Pack, Margaret (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In 2004-5 a new primary health organisation (PHO) project was established that aimed to improve access to equitable health care for the residents of three suburban areas of Lower Hutt, Wellington serviced by three medical practices. After an early successful funding tender in the Ministry of Health, PHO funding round, the MidValley PHO Charitable Trust was formed and from there the MidValley Well-being Service was established and developed in 2005-7. Through positive feedback from Ministry of Health at the two-year evaluation, the service was funded for a third year and at the time of writing continues to grow and expand. This article is a reflection of 'lessons learned' in establishing a new PHO initiative in the community mental health services which is seen as accurately attuning and responding to the needs of the local resident population. The author describes the ways in which social work's traditional concerns of social justice, Treaty of Waitangi principles of partnership, protection, self determination and participation, and a holistic approach to health care can assist in the envisioning of new service development under PHO initiatives.

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  • The Concept of Hope in Gestalt Therapy: Its Usefulness for Ameliorating Vicarious Traumatisation

    Pack, Margaret (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Hope is intrinsic to the work of psychotherapy yet it remains implicit in much of what we do as psychotherapists. The concept of hope is discussed in this article in relation to the vicarious traumatisation literature. I reflect upon an example from my practice with a description of the wider field of the community in which I work to illustrate an approach to balancing hope and despair. In situations of apparent 'no hope' illustrated in my practice with a middle aged woman and her family, I draw upon the underlying optimism and perseverance in Gestalt therapy as the key to staying present and in the moment with the client. The underlying optimism and courage of Gestalt theory, when operationalised, I conclude, is a vital component of clinician effectiveness and self care when working therapeutically. In particular, hope and an attitude of 'optimistic perseverance' are essential when working with clients who are living in situations of material deprivation, trauma and whose presentation raises complex, existential themes and dilemmas for the therapist.

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  • Sexual Abuse Counsellors' Response to Stress and Trauma: a Social Work Perspective

    Pack, Margaret (2004)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Based on qualitative interviews with 36 ACC-approved counsellors and their significant others, this research explores the range of social, organisational and theoretical factors that impact on sexual abuse counsellors. In this context the author explores the relevance of "vicarious traumatisation" and the strategies and theoretical approaches used to foster counsellors' well-being. Current literature about vicarious traumatisation suggests that counsellors' exposure to their clients' trauma may increase their risk of burn-out and secondary traumatisation. The relationship between counsellors' responses to their clients' trauma and the theoretical frameworks they use in practice, and the impact of the counsellors' work on their relationships with their partners, colleagues, friends and family, are explored. The model of stress and trauma developed highlights that counsellors experience stress when there are inconsistencies between their personal philosophies, their practice experience (or what they are exposed to in their dealings with dients) and the theoretical frameworks they use in practice. This sense of disjuncture provides the impetus for the development of alternative frameworks for practice that increase the resilience of counsellors who work intensively with traumatic material. The model of stress and trauma developed introduces a multi-level understanding of the challenges faced by sexual abuse counsellors and the implications for their relationships with their significant others.

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  • Sexual Abuse Counsellors' Responses to Stress and Trauma: a Social Work Perspective

    Pack, Margaret (2004)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Based on qualitative interviews with 36 ACC-approved counsellors, this research explores the range of social, organisational and theoretical factors that impact on sexual abuse counsellors. In this context the author explores the relevance of "vicarious traumatisation" and the strategies and theoretical approaches used to foster counsellors' well-being. Current literature about vicarious traumatisation suggests that counsellors' exposure to their clients' trauma may increase their risk of burn-out and secondary traumatisation. The relationship between counsellors' responses to their clients' trauma and the theoretical frameworks they use in practice, and the impact of the counsellors' work on their relationships with their partners, colleagues, friends and family, are explored. The model of stress and trauma developed highlights that counsellors experience stress when there are inconsistencies between their personal philosophies, their practice experience (or what they are exposed to in their dealings with dients) and the theoretical frameworks they use in practice. This sense of disjuncture provides the impetus for the development of alternative frameworks for practice that increase the resilience of counsellors who work intensively with traumatic material. The model of stress and trauma developed introduces a multi-level understanding of the challenges faced by sexual abuse counsellors and the implications for their relationships with their significant others.

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  • Doing Dirty Work?: Sponsors of Community Service

    Pack, Margaret (1989)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    With the introduction of the Criminal Justice Act 1985 and its orientation toward the provision of community based sentencing options, there is a growing awareness of the importance of encouraging a wide range of sponsoring organizations and individuals to become involved in administering community based sentences. This paper presents the results of an exploratory research project carried out in 1986, which asked people sponsoring community service sentence what they liked about the sentence and how they thought it could be improved, drawing on their experiences as sponsors.

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  • Counselling Distance Learners: An Experiment at the Open Polytechnic of New Zealand

    Pack, Margaret (1995)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In August 1993, The Open Polytechnic decided to establish a counselling service for it's 30,000 enrolled students. Historically, The Open Polytechnic (previously the Technical Correspondence Institute) had specialised in trades and vocationally based courses, having been developed after the Second World War by the Government of the day to rehabilitate returned servicemen. As students studied by correspondence, it was possible for ex-serviceman to complete vocational qualifications without the disruption of leaving home and work to study.

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