6 results for Palmer, A

  • Exhaled breath analysis using a carbon nanotube-based sensor array for metabolic and cardiovascular applications

    Gladding, P; Tawhai, Merryn; Cater, John; Mackenzie, E; Villas-Boas, Silas; Taylor, M; Palmer, A; Jain, D; Barbera, J (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • An analysis of the sensitivity of sap flux to soil and plant variables assessed for an Australian woodland using a soil-plant-atmosphere model

    Zeppel, M; Ng, Catriona; Palmer, A; Taylor, D; Whitley, R; Fuentes, S; Yunusa, I; Williams, M; Eamus, D (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Daily and seasonal patterns of tree water use were measured for the two dominant tree species, Angophora bakeri E.C.Hall (narrow-leaved apple) and Eucalyptus sclerophylla (Blakely) L.A.S. Johnson & Blaxell (scribbly gum), in a temperate, open, evergreen woodland using sap flow sensors, along with information about soil, leaf, tree and micro-climatological variables. The aims of this work were to: (a) validate a soil???plant???atmosphere (SPA) model for the specific site; (b) determine the total depth from which water uptake must occur to achieve the observed rates of tree sap flow; (c) examine whether the water content of the upper soil profile was a significant determinant of daily rates of sap flow; and (d) examine the sensitivity of sap flow to several biotic factors. It was found that: (a) the SPA model was able to accurately replicate the hourly, daily and seasonal patterns of sap flow; (b) water uptake must have occurred from depths of up to 3 m; (c) sap flow was independent of the water content of the top 80 cm of the soil profile; and (d) sap flow was very sensitive to the leaf area of the stand, whole tree hydraulic conductance and the critical water potential of the leaves, but insensitive to stem capacitance and increases in root biomass. These results are important to future studies of the regulation of vegetation water use, landscape-scale behaviour of vegetation, and to water resource managers, because they allow testing of large-scale management options without the need for large-scale manipulations of vegetation cover.

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  • Silicic tephras in Pleistocene shallow???marine sediments of Wanganui Basin, New Zealand

    Pillans, B; Alloway, Brent; Naish, T; Westgate, J; Abbott, S; Palmer, A (2005-09-07)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Vitric???rich volcaniclastic horizons are important for correlation of glacio???eustatic sedimentary cycles, both within the well known shallow???marine record of Wanganui Basin, and other New Zealand terrestrial and deep marine records. They also record distal major rhyolitic eruptions from the Taupo (TVZ) and Coromandel (CVZ) Volcanic Zones that are lacking in proximal source areas. Twenty???eight volcaniclastic horizons are recognised in the Castlecliffian and late Nukumaruan strata of Wanganui Basin from glass shard major element geochemistry and stratigraphic position, and are dated using magnetostratigraphy, orbitally tuned cyclostratigraphy and isothermal plateau fission track (ITPFT) ages. The major named volcaniclastic horizons (with ITPFT and/or astronomical ages, respectively) are: Onepuhi (0.57 Ma), Kupe (0.63 ?? 0.08 Ma; 0.65 Ma), Kaukatea (0.86 ?? 0.08 Ma; 0.90 Ma), Potaka (1.00 ?? 0.03 Ma; 0.99 Ma), Rewa (1.20 ?? 0.14 Ma; 1.19 Ma), Mangapipi (1.51 ?? 0.16 Ma, 1.54 Ma), Ridge (1.56 Ma), Pakihikura (1.58 ?? 0.08 Ma; 1.58 Ma), Birdgrove (1.60 Ma), Mangahou (1.63 Ma), Maranoa (1.63 Ma), Ototoka (1.72 ?? 0.32 Ma; 1.64 Ma), Table Flat (1.71 ?? 0.12 Ma; 1.65 Ma), Vinegar Hill (1.75 ?? 0.20 Ma; 1.75 Ma), and Waipuru (1.79 ?? 0.15 Ma; 1.83 Ma). The ITPFT ages are consistent with the astronomically tuned Geomagnetic Polarity Timescale. Volcaniclastic horizons in Wanganui Basin have been emplaced through a variety of primary and secondary processes, including direct tephra???fall as well as transitional water supported mass flow through to hyperconcentrated flow. No gas supported flow deposits have yet been recognised. Only some horizons from Wanganui Basin can be chemically and chronologically linked to known TVZ eruptions, while others remain uncorrelated owing to proximal source area erosion and/or burial as well as vapour phase alteration and devitrification within near???source welded ignimbrites. Nevertheless, many volcaniclastic deposits in Wanganui Basin can be reliably correlated to distal sedimentary successions in Auckland Region, Hawke's Bay and in Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) cores 1123 and 1124, to the east of New Zealand. The orbitally tuned chronology for ODP cores, which is calibrated by numeric ages on tephras and magnetostratigraphy, enhances inter???regional correlation, providing an important framework for future pal???aeoenvironmental reconstructions.

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  • Exhaled breath analysis using a carbon nanotube-based sensor array for metabolic and cardiovascular applications

    Gladding, P; Tawhai, Merryn; Cater, John; McKenzie, EJ; Villas-Boas, Silas; Taylor, M; Palmer, A; Jain, D; Barbera, J (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • School-based prevention of Acute Rheumatic Fever: A Group Randomised Trial in New Zealand

    Lennon, Diana; Stewart, Joanna; Farrell, E; Palmer, A; Mason, H (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and its sequela, rheumatic heart disease is the commonest cause of childhood cardiac morbidity globally. The current approach to the prevention of a primary attack of rheumatic fever in children using oral medication for streptococcal pharyngitis is poorly supported. The efficacy of injectable penicillin, in high rheumatic fever incidence military environments is indisputable. Objective: To evaluate school-based control of rheumatic fever in an endemic area. Methods: Fifty-three schools ( 22,000 students) from a rheumatic fever high incidence setting ( 60/100,000) in Auckland, New Zealand were randomized. The control group received routine general practice care. The intervention was a school-based sore throat clinic program with free nurse-observed oral penicillin treatment of group A streptococcal pharyngitis. The outcome measure was ARF in any child attending a study school. Analysis A defined ARF cases using criteria derived from Jones Criteria 1965 (definite) and 1956 (probable) with more precise definitions. Analysis B was based on 1992 Jones criteria but also included echocardiography to determine definite cases. Results: In Analysis A, 24 (55/100,000) cases occurred in clinic schools and 29 (67/100,000) in nonclinic schools, a 21% reduction when adjusted for demography and study design (P 0.47). Analysis B revealed a 28% reduction 26 (59/100,000) and 33 (77/100,000) cases, respectively (P 0.27). Conclusion: This study involving 86,874 person-years showed a nonsignificant reduction in the school-based sore throat clinic programs.

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  • Incorporating the ethnographic perspective: The value, process and responsibility of working with human participants

    Malone, Nicholas; Palmer, A; Wade, AH (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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