3 results for Parsons, M.

  • An evaluation of two respite models for older people and their informal caregivers

    King, A.; Parsons, M. (2005)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aim: To evaluate two case-management models of respite relief care at Waitemata District Health Board. Method: The evaluation consisted of semi-structured interviews and postal surveys for clients utilising respite care and staff members involved in both the North/West and Rodney models of respite care in Auckland, New Zealand. Across the two regions, a total of 2 older people and their informal caregivers, 2 respite coordinators, and the Needs Assessment Service Coordination (NASC) Manager were interviewed. In addition, postal surveys were received from 21 older people, 36 informal caregivers, 11 NASC workers, and 3 allied health professionals. Results: Findings revealed there was generally high satisfaction with both the respite models. Caregivers believed the respite service did give them a break, although it was insufficient. Caregivers reported concerns regarding how respite facilities could improve and the older person's deterioration post respite. Staff identified improvements for each of the models. Conclusions: The respite models are flexible and provide control in decision-making for informal caregivers leading to an increase in choice for home-based respite. Case-managers need to form strong partnerships with caregivers to ensure that the needs of both the informal caregiver and older person are met. Short-term placement in residential respite facilities for respite care may be linked to worsening functional ability of the older person.

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  • Quality of residential care for older people: Does education for healthcare assistants make a difference?

    Smith, B.M.S.; Kerse, N.; Parsons, M. (2005)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aim: To determine the impact of a healthcare assistant education programme on the quality of care for older people living in a residential home in Auckland, New Zealand. Method: A pre- and post-intervention evaluation study was undertaken within a residential home for older people. Quality of care was established by two periods of non-participant time-sampling observation of residents, separated by a programme of 10 interactive teaching sessions for healthcare assistants. Informed consent was gained from all observed residents and staff. Results: Using the Quality Assessment Project (QAP) quality measure, the nonparticipant time-sampling observation data identified a 12.5% increase in resident care that was considered appropriate and adequate (chi-squared=12.05) - and an 11.53% decrease in resident care that was considered inappropriate and inadequate (chi-squared=11.43). The intermediate grades did not alter significantly. Residents with low functional activity scores (Barthel Index) received better care after the education intervention (chi-squared=32.99), as did residents with moderate cognitive impairment (Abbreviated Mental Test Score [AMTS]<8/10). Conclusion: Healthcare assistant education can positively impact on the quality of care given to older people in residential care.

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  • The Social, Cultural, Ethical and Spiritual Implications of Genetic Testing and the Storage of Genetic Information

    Du Plessis, R.; Scott, A.; Phillips, H.; Cram, F.; Tipene-Matua, B.; Parsons, M.; Taupo, K. (2005)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    Public participation in discussion and decision-making about the development, use and regulation of science and technology is increasingly identified as a necessary component of democratic states. The challenge is how to effect this participation and encourage public engagement in conversations about science and technology issues. How can citizens be incorporated into discussion, debate and the formulation of policy? How can their knowledge and understandings have an impact on the decisions about the development and application of these technologies? What can we learn from conversations among members of community organisations, informal networks and whanau/family groups about the implications for their lives of these technologies? This paper summarises the preliminary findings from twenty-four focus groups convened to talk about genetic profiling, direct to consumer genetic testing and biobanking. Eight of these groups included only Maori participants, while the other sixteen groups were predominantly Pakeha. The responses in Maori specific groups and the groups drawn from the general population are initially analysed separately. This is followed by attention to some of the connections and differences between conversations in the Maori specific groups and the other groups.

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