3 results for Perese, LM

  • Growing Up in New Zealand: A longitudinal study of New Zealand children and their families: Report 1: Before we are born.

    Morton, Susan; Atatoa Carr, PE; Bandara, DK; Grant, Cameron; Ivory, VC; Kingi, TR; Liang, R; Perese, LM; Peterson, Elizabeth; Pryor, JE; Reese, E; Robinson, EM; Schmidt, Johanna; Waldie, Karen (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Growing Up in New Zealand: A longitudinal study of New Zealand children and their families. Report 1: Before we are born. Auckland: Growing Up in New Zealand.

    Morton, SMB; Atatoa Carr, PE; Bandara, DK; Grant, CC; Ivory, VC; Kingi, TR; Liang, R; Perese, LM; Peterson, E; Pryor, JE; Reese, E; Robinson, EM; Schmidt, JM; Waldie, KE (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    1.1 Background. Growing Up in New Zealand was set up in response to a recognised need by New Zealand policymakers for more robust, contemporary, population relevant evidence to inform their efforts to improve the quality of young New Zealander’s lives. The Ministry of Social Development has been the lead agency responsible for commissioning and funding this study, with support from multiple other agencies including Ministries of Health, Education, Justice, and Research, Science and Technology as well as Statistics New Zealand, the Families Commission, Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs, Department of Labour, New Zealand Police, SPARC (Sport and Recreation New Zealand) and Te Puni Kokiri. The design and processes for this study were subject to an extensive, peer-reviewed development phase between 2005 and 2007. After agreement that the proposed design would meet the required objectives, the longitudinal study proper was launched as Growing Up in New Zealand in April 2008.

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  • Two Years On: Gambling Amongst Pacific Mothers Living in New Zealand

    Perese, LM; Bellringer, M; Williams, MM; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Research investigating the prevalence and correlates of Pacific peoples gambling within a New Zealand context is limited. This paper provides data about gambling activity from the two-year data collection point for a cohort of mothers within the longitudinal Pacific Islands Families study. The results indicate a number of consistencies and discrepancies between data collected at this time point and two years previously (six-week baseline data collection point). For example, at baseline, Samoans were the least likely to gamble and spent less money on gambling activities. Two years later, Samoans remained the least likely to gamble, but those who did gamble, were more likely to spend more money than other ethnicities. This article highlights the importance of this type of prospective study in examining the development of the risk and protective factors in relation to the development of problem gambling.

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