12 results for Petrova, K

  • Bridging the research-practice gap in requirements engineering through effective teaching and peer learning

    Connor, AM; Buchan, J; Petrova, K (2014-04-10)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of the research-practice gap as it is perceived in the field of software requirements engineering. An analysis of this gap has shown that two key causes for the research-practice gap are lack of effective communication and the relatively light coverage of requirements engineering material in University programmes. We discuss the design and delivery of a masters course in software requirements engineering (SRE) that is designed to overcome some of the issues that have caused the research-practice gap. By encouraging students to share their experiences in a peer learning environment, we aim to improve shared understanding between students (many of whom are current industry practitioners) and researchers (including academic staff members) to improve the potential for effective collaborations, whilst simultaneously developing the requirements engineering skill sets of the enrolled students. Feedback from students in the course is discussed and directions for the future development of the curriculum and learning strategies are given.

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  • What's in a Programme?

    Cusack, B; Petrova, K (2011-08-12)

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    Teaching and research in information technology (IT) is always a reflection of the ever changing landscape of change and continuous innovation. IT programmes also show how content evolves over time, and the emphasis shifts. The current 'digital forensics' buzz-word is not different from the former programming, applications, security, eBusiness and other ubiquitous buzz-words of the past; in fact digital forensics has swept up many of the curriculum remnants of the last decade into a market driven package of law, professionalism and IT technicality.

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  • Mobile services and applications: towards a balanced adoption model

    Petrova, K; MacDonell, SG (2011-10-19)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper synthesizes prior research to develop a novel model for the study of the adoption of mobile business services and applications incorporating a demand and supply perspective. The model complements and extends existing models while also leveraging data from industry reports; in particular, it focuses on the interrelationships between participants in the mobile services value chain and the impact of these interrelationships on the adoption of new services in a competitive and technology-saturated service market. There has been to date limited research reported that has considered the dynamics of the interrelationships between customers and (layers of) multiple service providers as a factor in the adoption and acceptance process; the proposed model addresses this gap and advocates the use of a combination of design science and service science methodologies. It is concluded that not mobility per se but the way mobility is used to create value plays a significant role as an adoption driver, and that the quality of the service and its relevance to personal or business lifestyle are the most important decision making factors. It is also asserted that while innovative mobile services (i.e., services that are not already offered using a different technology) may be compelling if they meet lifestyle needs, mobile services replacing or complementing existing ones will be favored by customers only if their quality is exceptional and motivates ‘switching’ to the mobile service.

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  • Focus and setting in mobile learning research: a review of the literature

    Petrova, K; Li, C (2011-11-13)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Mobile learning (mLearning) is an ubiquitous learning activity supported by the appropriate mobile technology and pedagogical approach. Mobile learning research has experienced a significant growth in the last half a decade, following the increase in innovative applications and the expansion of the contexts in which mLearning is deployed. Based on a review of publications found in international conference proceedings and journals, this study classifies mLearning research according to its focus, and proposes a classification framework. Patterns in shifting research focus are identified and some defining characteristics of the approaches undertaken are elicited. The results of the analysis show that while mobile learning research continues to be motivated by the innovative mobile technology it is also increasingly concerned with the development of a theoretical foundation in order to underpin the new paradigm and inform contemporary mobile learning design and practice.

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  • Biometric security systems: finally, a friend?

    Petrova, K (2011-11-13)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Information systems security has broadened its meaning and significance and has started to affect our lives and behaviours. The research literature identifies five related research domains: information systems, security policies, security technologies, security assurance, and security interfaces. This paper discusses some aspects of user acceptance of biometrical measurements for the purposes of authentication and access control and concludes that initial user rejection of the commonly implemented biometrics and fear of privacy abuse have been replaced by a de facto user acceptance. It hypothesizes that there is correlation between users’ awareness of the broader consequences of a particular biometric system and the level of their acceptance of the system.

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  • If only we had time

    Fielden, K; Petrova, K (2011-11-13)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper is a comparative study of two institutions taking part in the national teaching/postgraduate study nexus research project started in 2005. This multi stakeholder comparative case study was based on a series of interviews with Heads of School, Human Resource personnel and members of senior management team and on a questionnaire sent to teaching staff currently engaged in their own postgraduate study. Outcomes discussed include both positive and negative factors such as time pressure, stress, recognition, employment contracts, senior staff expectations, family, collegial and institutional support, integration of own study with teaching practice and content. Implications for alignment across institutional organisational levels and for positioning of higher education institutions within the tertiary education and research sector are also discussed.

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  • Location based services: A roadmap for New Zealand

    Petrova, K; Wang, B (2011-11-13)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The advancement in mobile, wireless and positioning technologies have enabled applications and services such as route guiding and emergency call-out assistance. These and other similar services have become known as ‘location-based services’ (LBS). The literature on LBS development and deployment addresses technological issues (for example, usability and integration) and issues related to LBS implementation – including LBS adoption and user privacy protection, and LBS business models. In this paper, LBS development and deployment are studied from a global perspective and the New Zealand LBS landscape is explored and analysed. It is suggested that legislation, technology and business strategies are the main universal drivers of LBS development. In New Zealand, the regulatory environment emerges as the most significant critical success factor (including emergency call location and a competitive service provider market).

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  • Evaluating mobile learning artefacts

    Petrova, K; Li, C (2011-11-13)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The design of mLearning applications based on mobile data technologies and the development of mLearning services implementing them is driven both by mobile technology innovation, and by the trend towards more student-centered and personalized learning. mLearning activities are normally delivered through an mLearning service, which may use a specialized hardware/software mobile learning artefact. The study aims to develop a framework for the evaluation of innovative mLearning artefacts with respect to their potential to succeed as mLearning services. The perceptions of the mLearning users are investigated in order to identify the dimensions of the framework. The outcomes of the completed study may highlight the role of artefact design in the adoption of the mLearning service and provide directions to artefact designers.

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  • Mobile payment: towards a customer-centric model

    Petrova, K (2011-11-11)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Mobile payment normally occurs as a wireless transaction of monetary value and includes the initiation, authorization and the realization of the payment. Such transactions are facilitated by purpose-built mobile payment systems that are part of the service infrastructure supporting the functioning of mobile business applications. A number of stakeholder groups may be involved in concluding a mobile payment transaction, among them customers, mobile operators, financial institutions, merchants, and intermediaries. In this paper, mobile payment systems are characterised from the point of view of the stakeholder groups. Building on existing work, a supply and demand model for the investigation of mPayment services is presented, and applied to a case study.

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  • Designing mobile games for engagement and learning

    Parsons, D; Petrova, K; Hokyoung, R (2011-12-04)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Game based mobile learning is becoming increasingly popular, now that mobile devices provide support for multimedia content, location awareness, augmented reality and connectivity. However just having technical features does not make a game either engaging or pedagogical. The challenge for designers of games for mobile learning is to embed both effective gaming experiences and worthwhile learning outcomes into the same application. The game described and discussed in this paper was designed as an augmented reality game for two players. The narrative action follows a classic linear fiction model, whereby the game’s phases move through teaser, elaboration, conflict escalation, climax and resolution. This narrative path is reflected by a physical path as players navigate the location and investigate the problem they have to solve.

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  • BACIT@Six

    Petrova, K (2012-02-11)

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract

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  • Students revising for test using SMS

    Petrova, K (2012-02-11)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper an experiment involving mLearning using Short Message Service (SMS) is described. The experiment was designed after a study of the readiness of the participants in terms of mobile device ownership, mobile technology preferences, and learning styles. Qualitative data was gathered and analysed using an activity theory framework. The SMS scenario developed for the experiment is contentspecific and was provided as a commercial service in ‘pull’ mode. The study allowed to conclude that mobility support, information density, and information relevance were the factors which contribute most to creating mLearning value while cost was a major detractor.

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