3 results for Phillips, A

  • The use of gastric juice to aid in liquefaction and drainage of pancreatic necrosis

    Brown, L; Hong, Jiwon; Petrov, M; Windsor, J; Phillips, A (2016-04)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim: Percutaneous and trans-gastric drainage are the two first line surgical options for treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN). The uses of adjuncts to help liquefy solid components of necrosis are being utilized, such as the use of irrigants like hydrogen peroxide. The use of patients' own gastric juice (GJ) has not yet been formally evaluated in its ability to liquefy IPN. The aim was to investigate the ability of GJ to liquefy IPN and thus enhance drainage ability.

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  • Genome-wide association study of CNVs in 16,000 cases of eight common diseases and 3,000 shared controls

    Craddock, N; Hurles, ME; Cardin, N; Pearson, RD; Plagnol, V; Robson, S; Vukcevic, D; Barnes, C; Conrad, DF; Giannoulatou, E; Holmes, C; Marchini, JL; Stirrups, K; Tobin, MD; Wain, LV; Yau, C; Aerts, J; Ahmad, T; Andrews, TD; Arbury, H; Attwood, A; Auton, A; Ball, SG; Balmforth, AJ; Barrett, JC; Barroso, I; Barton, A; Bennett, AJ; Bhaskar, S; Blaszczyk, K; Bowes, J; Brand, OJ; Braund, PS; Bredin, F; Breen, G; Brown, MJ; Bruce, IN; Bull, J; Burren, OS; Burton, J; Byrnes, J; Caesar, S; Clee, CM; Coffey, AJ; Connell, JMC; Cooper, JD; Dominiczak, AF; Downes, K; Drummond, HE; Dudakia, D; Dunham, A; Ebbs, B; Eccles, D; Edkins, S; Edwards, C; Elliot, A; Emery, P; Evans, DM; Evans, G; Eyre, S; Farmer, A; Ferrier, IN; Feuk, L; Fitzgerald, T; Flynn, E; Forbes, A; Forty, L; Franklyn, JA; Freathy, RM; Gibbs, P; Gilbert, P; Gokumen, O; Gordon-Smith, K; Gray, E; Green, E; Groves, CJ; Grozeva, D; Gwilliam, R; Hall, A; Hammond, N; Hardy, M; Harrison, P; Hassanali, N; Hebaishi, H; Hines, S; Hinks, A; Hitman, GA; Hocking, L; Howard, E; Howard, P; Howson, JMM; Hughes, D; Hunt, S; Isaacs, JD; Jain, M; Jewell, DP; Johnson, T; Jolley, JD; Jones, IR; Jones, LA; Kirov, G; Langford, CF; Lango-Allen, H; Lathrop, GM; Lee, J; Lee, Kathryn; Lees, C; Lewis, K; Lindgren, CM; Maisuria-Armer, M; Maller, J; Mansfield, J; Martin, P; Massey, DCO; McArdle, WL; McGuffin, P; McLay, KE; Mentzer, A; Mimmack, ML; Morgan, AE; Morris, AP; Mowat, C; Myers, S; Newman, W; Nimmo, ER; O'Donovan, MC; Onipinla, A; Onyiah, I; Ovington, NR; Owen, MJ; Palin, K; Parnell, K; Pernet, D; Perry, JRB; Phillips, A; Pinto, D; Prescott, NJ; Prokopenko, I; Quail, MA; Rafelt, S; Rayner, NW; Redon, R; Reid, DM; Renwick, A; Ring, SM; Robertson, N; Russell, E; Clair, DS; Sambrook, JG; Sanderson, JD; Schuilenburg, H; Scott, CE; Scott, R; Seal, S; Shaw-Hawkins, S; Shields, BM; Simmonds, MJ; Smyth, DJ; Somaskantharajah, E; Spanova, K; Steer, S; Stephens, J; Stevens, HE; Stone, MA; Su, Z; Symmons, DPM; Thompson, JR; Thomson, W; Travers, ME; Turnbull, C; Valsesia, A; Walker, M; Walker, NM; Wallace, C; Warren-Perry, M; Watkins, NA; Webster, J; Weedon, MN; Wilson, AG; Woodburn, M; Wordsworth, BP; Young, AH; Zeggini, E; Carter, NP; Frayling, TM; Lee, C; McVean, G; Munroe, PB; Palotie, A; Sawcer, SJ; Scherer, SW; Strachan, DP; Tyler-Smith, C; Brown, MA; Burton, PR; Caulfield, MJ; Compston, A; Farrall, M; Gough, SCL; Hall, AS; Hattersley, AT; Hill, AVS; Mathew, CG; Pembrey, M; Satsangi, J; Stratton, MR; Worthington, J; Deloukas, P; Duncanson, A; Kwiatkowski, DP; McCarthy, MI; Ouwehand, WH; Parkes, M; Rahman, N; Todd, JA; Samani, NJ; Donnelly, P (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Copy number variants (CNVs) account for a major proportion of human genetic polymorphism and have been predicted to have an important role in genetic susceptibility to common disease. To address this we undertook a large, direct genome-wide study of association between CNVs and eight common human diseases. Using a purpose-designed array we typed ,19,000 individuals into distinct copy-number classes at 3,432 polymorphic CNVs, including an estimated ,50% of all common CNVs larger than 500 base pairs. We identified several biological artefacts that lead to false-positive associations, including systematic CNV differences between DNAs derived from blood and cell lines. Association testing and follow-up replication analyses confirmed three loci where CNVs were associated with disease???IRGM for Crohn???s disease, HLA for Crohn???s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes, and TSPAN8 for type 2 diabetes???although in each case the locus had previously been identified in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based studies, reflecting our observation that most common CNVs that are well-typed on our array are well tagged by SNPs and so have been indirectly explored through SNP studies. We conclude that common CNVs that can be typed on existing platforms are unlikely to contribute greatly to the genetic basis of common human diseases.

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  • Vitamin B6 is required for full motility and virulence in Helicobacter pylori

    Grubman, A; Phillips, A; Thibonnier, M; Kaparakis-Liaskos, M; Johnson, C; Thiberge, J-M; Radcliff, Fiona; Ecobichon, C; Labigne, A; de Reuse, H; Mendz, GL; Ferrero, RL (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of how Helicobacter pylori causes disease, the factors that allow this pathogen to persist in the stomach have not yet been fully characterized. To identify new virulence factors in H. pylori, we generated low-infectivity variants of a mouse-colonizing H. pylori strain using the classical technique of in vitro attenuation. The resulting variants and their highly infectious progenitor bacteria were then analyzed by global gene expression profiling. The gene expression levels of five open reading frames (ORFs) were significantly reduced in low-infectivity variants, with the most significant changes observed for ORFs HP1583 and HP1582. These ORFs were annotated as encoding homologs of the Escherichia coli vitamin B6 biosynthesis enzymes PdxA and PdxJ. Functional complementation studies with E. coli confirmed H. pylori PdxA and PdxJ to be bona fide homologs of vitamin B6 biosynthesis enzymes. Importantly, H. pylori PdxA was required for optimal growth in vitro and was shown to be essential for chronic colonization in mice. In addition to having a well-known metabolic role, vitamin B6 is necessary for the synthesis of glycosylated flagella and for flagellum-based motility in H. pylori. Thus, for the first time, we identify vitamin B6 biosynthesis enzymes as novel virulence factors in bacteria. Interestingly, pdxA and pdxJ orthologs are present in a number of human pathogens, but not in mammalian cells. We therefore propose that PdxA/J enzymes may represent ideal candidates for therapeutic targets against bacterial pathogens.

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