3 results for Phillips, Emma

  • Forecasting the consequences of the failure of the eastern rim of Crater Lake, Mount Ruapehu : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Earth Science at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Phillips, Emma

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The appendices are on a CD-ROM which is held with the vault copy of the thesis. Appendices include logbook, lab work, Titan2D data and simulation videos.

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  • Quantifying slope-channel coupling in an active gully and fan complex at Tarndale, Waipaoa catchment, New Zealand

    Fuller, Ian C; Dean, Josh F; Phillips, Emma; Massey, Chris; Marden, Mike

    Working or discussion paper
    Massey University

    Two RIEGL LMS‐Z420i scanner surveys (November 2007 and November 2008) of the Tarndale Gully complex and its associated fan were used to generate a digital elevation model (DEM) of difference in order to quantify gully‐fan‐channel connectivity. The Te Weraroa Stream, into which the first order Tarndale system feeds, is buffered from sediment generated by the gully complex by a fan. Sediment yields and the role of the fan in buffering Te Weraroa Stream are inferred from the TLS of the entire complex. DEM analysis suggests that c.25% of material derived from the gully is buffered from the stream by being stored in the fan. This figure was applied to fan behaviour since December 2004, mapped on nine successive occasions using detailed GPS surveys to get a longer‐term picture of sediment supply within the system and appraise a qualitative assessment of connectivity constructed on the basis of fan behaviour alone.

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  • Akha zangr : the Akha system of sustainable development and its conflicts with Thailand's development process : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Development Studies at Massey University

    Phillips, Emma

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis assesses Akha "zangr" ("way of life") as an indigenous system of development relevant to Akha development in the highlands of Thailand. It uses the principles of sustainable development studies, incorporating empowerment, gender, environment, health, education, justice, equality, poverty and participation as a framework for the assessment. This is the first study to examine Akha zangr as a system of sustainable development. It follows on from the description given by Alting von Geusau (1999) of Akha zangr as a "system for the sustainability and continuity of the Akha as a margnialised people". It is an attempt to empower the Akha community by giving credit to their knowledge and system of development as a modern rather than traditional system relevant to the 21st century. In Thailand there are nine ethnic groups officially recognised as indigenous to the highlands, each with a unique language and "zangr" based on strategies for survival and development in the highland environment. This thesis describes their common experiences of the Thai development process. Consequences include political and social exclusion from participation in the development process, their unjustified label as "problem makers" in Thai politics, and the inaccurate assessment of Mountain People as ignorant and backward. Disastrous impacts of foreign development in the highlands include deforestation, poverty, human rights abuses and a loss of cultural independence and knowledge for minority ethnic groups. Thailand's development process is examined based on increasing economic growth. Discussions focus on the industrialisation period initiated in the 1950's until the present day that, on paper, closely follow trends in international development thought. Thailand's policies of sustainable development have so far been ineffective in reducing environmental degradation from rapid economic growth and instead exclude local people from participating in the management of the environment. The assessment concludes that Thailand's top-down national economic growth policies have failed to improve the quality of life for the most disadvantaged people in Thai society and instead have caused massive environmental degradation, increased poverty, inequalities and the disempowerment of individuals and the community.

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