25 results for Piercy, Gemma Louise

  • Reworking vocational education: policies, practices and concepts [Book review]

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book: “Reworking vocational education: policies, practices and concepts”, edited by Anja Heikkinen and Katrin Kraus, Bern, Peter Lang, Studies in vocational and continuing education, Vol. 7, 2009, 232 pp

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  • Work-based Learning: A New Higher Education? [Book Review]

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2002)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book: “Work-based Learning: A New Higher Education?”, edited by D. Boud & N. Solomon.

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  • Unions and the ‘knowledge society’

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2003)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcomes of the 1999 Labour Party Manifesto Skills for 21st Century: the Tertiary Education Strategy (TES), the Statement of Tertiary Education Priorities (STEP) 2003-2004, and the industry training review. Specifically, the paper evaluates the role of unions within the post-compulsory education and training sector (PCET). Thus the paper: analyses the policy changes in post-compulsory education and training, particularly that relating to industry training; reviews, briefly, international literature which focuses on the role of unions in post-compulsory education and training; and assesses the extent to which the re-introduction of unions can contribute to the necessary capacity building needed to overcome 10 years of marginalisation.

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  • Riding the knowledge wave: An examination of recent work-based learning in New Zealand

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper offers insights into the policy environment within which work-based learning takes place. Since 1999, work-based learning in New Zealand has been reframed by a series of ‘third way’ policies implemented by the Labour-led coalition government. These initiatives incorporate an interesting mix of borrowed ideas, principally from the United Kingdom, and domestic imperatives. The purpose of this paper is to outline, examine, and evaluate New Zealand’s ‘third way’ approach to education and training and its present and future implications for work-based learning. The direction of Labour’s policies was signaled in its 1999 election manifesto document, Skills for 21st Century. Buoyed by the support for and success of its initial policies, the government has continued to borrow and adapt overseas initiatives. This paper builds on previous comparative research (Piercy, 2003; Murray and Piercy, 2003). It traces the implementation of key policy reforms that relate to the broad area of work-based learning. It describes, briefly, the evolution of the current Tertiary Education Strategy (TES) and the contribution made by the ‘third way’ Tertiary Education Advisory Committee (TEAC). The TES is a five to seven year plan that intends to give focus and certainty to the entire post-compulsory education and training sector (PCET); this effectively includes all work-based learning. The paper also examines the three Statements of Educational Priorities (STEP) that have been released to date (the latest in April 2005). The STEPs constitute an action plan for each phase of the TES. The paper concludes that the adoption of a ‘third way’ approach since 1999 has not only altered significantly the role now played by employers, unions, and industry training organizations (ITOs) but also provided opportunities to transform important aspects of work-based learning.

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  • Developing a quality workforce: Linking a strategic research agenda to industry training; and Higher level skill needs and worker voice: Exploring new ground in skills analysis.

    Cochrane, William; Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation will pivot around the relationship between industry training, workplace productivity, worker voice, and the role of unions. Two, linked mini-papers will be presented. Both built on material presented to last year’s forum. The first minipaper summarises a template developed by the researchers in response to approaches from Industry Training Organisations. Its focus is on labour market skills forecasting. The second mini-paper breaks new ground. It outlines the broad thrust of a new research project that explores the more advanced skills required by workers in order to participate effectively in high performance (manufacturing) workplace schemes. Underpinning both mini-papers is the researchers’ central focus on the ways in which on-the-job union activity, the redesign of work, workers’ education and training, and employee involvement at the workplace can come together in order to provide workers with a ‘voice’ both in their work and in the wider society. The mini-papers assume that workplace productivity is central not only to the growth of the New Zealand economy, but also to union renewal and the achievement of the union movement’s social agenda. But they also recognise that for unions and workers the present emphasis on the ‘knowledge society’ will fall short of their economic and social aspirations unless it looks well beyond the myopic horizon of narrow, inherently self-limiting, skills training. The presentation will end with an integrative conclusion.

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  • Social work and human services best practice [Book review]

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2010-11)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book: “Social work and human services best practice”, edited by Wing Hong Chui and Jill Wilson, Annandale, The Federation Press.

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  • Preparing to teach in the lifelong learning sector [Book review]

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2009-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    It must be a challenging task indeed to write an introductory text on adult education suitable for a very wide audience. As a mentor to novice tutors, I am always curious to see how such a challenge is met, hence my interest in this book, Preparing to teach in the lifelong learning sector. I was intrigued as to which ideas and theories would be highlighted. I was also interested to discover which techniques, normally refined over years of practice, would be described and discussed in order to allow for immediate implementation. In short, I wanted to see how the author would turn novice tutors, irrespective of the context, into adult educators.

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  • Lean, but is it mean? Union members’ views on a high performance workplace system

    Cochrane, William; Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The growing literature on high performance workplace systems suggests that in a unionised environment such systems can be advantageous for workers. This paper reports on a study of New Zealand dairy workers’ views on the introduction of a hpws. It reports little evidence to support the more optimistic claims in the literature. But it also reports that union members still support hpws, primarily for reasons of job security. Thus notwithstanding many of the findings, the paper concludes that there are limited grounds for a degree of optimism about the potential of union involvement in hpws to enhance worker voice.

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  • The Carmichael vision and training reform: Some insights from across the Tasman

    Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2000)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper provides insights into aspects of trans--Tasman union influences in the 1980s and early 1990s. In particular, it examines Laurie Carmichael’s influence on New Zealand unions, especially with respect to education and training reforms. The paper traces how his influence grew as the relationship between the AMWU and the NZEU warmed through the 1980s. It also highlights the very major impact Australia Reconstructed had on thinking in New Zealand as unions struggled to respond to neoliberal policies and practices of the Fourth labour Government. The paper finds that the New Zealand reception of Australian ideas reflected, at least in part, the limitations o he left intellectual tradition in New Zealand.

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  • A 'third way' in industry training: New Zealand's adaptation of selected British policies

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2002)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This article has three integrated purposes. It seeks to provide insights into some of the ways in which: British policies and programmes historically and more recently have influenced New Zealand initiatives in industry training; those policies and programmes have been adapted to meet the country’s particular circumstances; and unions have influenced aspects of the adaptation and implementation.

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  • Do industry training reforms meet the needs of a medium sized electrical manufacturer? A case study

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (1998)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The Industry Training Act 1992 introduced significant changes to vocational education and training in New Zealand. Based on a case study of a Waikato firm, this paper investigates whether the changes resulting from the Industry Training Act 1992 have enabled a medium-sized electrical manufacturing firm to meet its training needs. The paper also examines questions relating to wider issues in regard to vocational education and training in New Zealand. Specifically, it discusses the issue of voluntarism, as it relates to the finding of Industrial Training Organisations (ITOs), the creation of qualifications, and the proposed removal of developmental funding that is presently provided through the Education and Training Support Agency (ETSA).

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  • Training and the new industrial relations: New Zealand research that explores Streeck’s Thesis

    Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2000)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This New Zealand research finds some support for Wolfgang Streeck’s thesis that education and training offer unions strategic possibilities in a neo-liberal environment. But it also finds that political strategies are necessary when unions’ quasi-constitutional status has been substantially diminished.

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  • Modern Apprenticeships: A third way in industry training?

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2003)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Modern Apprenticeship was one of Labour’s flagship policies to be implemented early in the Coalition Government’s first term. This case study of Modern Apprenticeship investigated the extent to which ‘third way’ rhetoric is present in industry training policy in New Zealand. The paper will compare and contrast the British and New Zealand models of Modern Apprenticeship. The paper concludes by outlining similarities and differences in the two models in order to ascertain the extent to which the model in New Zealand can be described as ‘third way’.

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  • Industry training organisations in changing times: New research possibilities

    Cochrane, William; Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The tertiary education reforms have placed considerable pressure on Industry Training Organisations (ITOs), which are now required to assume “new roles as strategic leaders in skills and training needs for the industries under their coverage” (Ministry of Education 2003a:21). This paper argues that the Statement of Tertiary Education Priorities (STEP) requirement can lead to productive relationships between ITOs and established research organisations. It considers the new context within which ITOs now operate and offers an illustrative case study of the sort of research that can result from collaborative relationships. Specifically, it reports on research commissioned by the New Zealand Industry Training Organisation (NZITO), which covers dairy manufacturing, meat processing, and leather processing, as part of its strategic planning. The research reported includes: an analysis of the industries covered by the NZITO and their economic significance; the impact of an ageing workforce and other demographic on the labour market and its implications for NZITO industries; the impact of technological change on the labour market; and some of the consequences of the continuing integration of the global economy.

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  • Women's participation in education and training in New Zealand: is the 'learn while you earn' option accessible to all?

    Piercy, Gemma Louise; Murray, Nicky; Abernethy, Gloria (2006)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Strong education and training systems are viewed as a route to increased labour market participation for groups that have traditionally been excluded from, or marginalised in, the labour market. Engagement in the labour force for such groups has both individual and societal benefits. However, while this emphasis on an increased role for the state in education and training is encouraging, commentators have questioned the ability of 'Third Way' discourse to meet the unique needs of women, given the absence of explicit feminist dialogue in wider discussions on associated policy and practice. Informed by this critique, this article aims to evaluate changes in education and training policy and practice in New Zealand since 1999, in terms of the extent to which it enhances opportunities for women's participation in education and training.

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  • Challenge’s of the Consumer Generation: Teaching experiences within the Certificate of University Preparation

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2001)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The University of Waikato’s Certificate of University Preparation (CUP) was offered for the first time in 2000. The purpose of CUP is to provide a second opportunity to students under 20 who failed to gain University Entrance at school. The cohort group has unique needs. The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of my experiences with the first cohort group and the strategies that were developed to meet their needs.

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  • Strategy and vision: The influence of the AMWU on the NZEU from 1987-1992 with respect to education and training reforms

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    It has been established that in the late 1980s, early 1990s the AMWU and the NZEU developed a close relationship through which the NZEU altered it traditional bargaining strategies. This study set out to discover the specific details of this relationship and its implications, with respect to education and training reforms, from around 1987-1992. The thesis began the investigation with a literature review, followed by an extensive series of interviews in Australia and New Zealand. The interviews were conducted with officials and former officials of the AMWU and the NZEU. Key players from the education and training reform process in both countries. The conclusion of this thesis is that, the pressure from the rise of neo-liberalism and the changes to production drove the NZEU to find alternative bargaining strategy. The strength of the unions in Australia and historical ties drew the NZEU to the AMWU, who under similar constraints, had formulated new bargaining strategies. These new strategies embraced 'partnership unionism' which used co-operative practices and training as a means of maintaining leverage under hostile conditions. This thesis asserts that the NZEU took on board the AMWU's 'partnership unionism', through their relationship, as they saw them as a means of maintaining leverage in a neo-liberal environment. Training is the linchpin of this approach highlighting the strategic importance of education and training to unions. This thesis concludes that the NZEU has been able to maintain its leverage in a neo-liberal environment because, in line with Wolfgang Streeck's analysis, it has recognised that education and training provide a degree of leverage in a hostile environment.

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  • The knowledge society and high performance workplace systems: Enhancing worker voice

    Cochrane, William; Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper focuses on an aspect of the ‘Future of Work’. The introduction of high performance workplace systems (hpws) is, in general terms, consistent with the broad thrust of the ‘knowledge society’ debate. The central thesis holds that the introduction of hpws has the potential to enhance ‘worker voice,’ especially in the context of a ‘third way’ political environment that fosters a more tripartite approach to industrial relations. The paper draws on several pieces of research, each of which has its own methodological approach. The discussion of the ‘knowledge society’ debate and the ‘third way’ political context draws on policy analyses undertaken by Law and Piercy. The body of the paper is based on a survey by Law of union members engaged in a hpws in a large NZ dairy factory. That research involved focus groups and a postal survey. Qualitative (write-in) responses were further analysed using a dynamic coding system developed by Law. The findings are consistent with the (US) work of Black and Lynch. With some qualifications, the introduction of hpws has enhanced worker participation. Active union involvement was a positive factor. For a proportion of union members, the introduction of hpws has had positive off-site effects.

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  • High performance workplaces and skill development: Updating the map of the territory

    Cochrane, William; Dharmalingam, Arunachalam; Harris, Paul; Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2006)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The impact of High Performance Workplace Systems (HPWS) on workers and unions is a contentious area for debate in the fields of industrial relations and social science in general. Proponents of HPWS claim that one of the benefits for workers is that they enable workers to develop and raise their skill levels. This paper offers a preliminary evaluation of that claim by sketching an updated map of the territory. It concludes that the HPWS literature contains significant weaknesses concerning the definition of skill in explaining what skill development means for workers, individually and collectively.

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  • Access and equity: second chance education bring the policy directives into life

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2001)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This case study illustrates how, in a time of exclusion, some initiatives still attempt to embrace the traditional concerns of inclusion. The University of Waikato in 2000 decided to push the access and equity policy envelope and ran a programme that enabled the inclusion of students into the university campus who previously would have been excluded by their lack of entrance qualifications till they were over 20. Primarily comprised of 18-19 years olds, this group represents the generation who have developed throughout the era of stratification and diversity that the conference theme denotes. This identity of the group is juxtaposed with the impetus behind their inclusion into the university’s structure. The paper will explain in detail what the Certificate of University Preparation (CUP) initiative is, its relationship to the policy directive of access and equity and why the author feels that it embraces the values of inclusion rather than exclusion, albeit in today’s consumer society. This will be done from the perspective of someone who is involved in the delivery of the Certificate and presents an exploration of the ‘issues’ associated with the programme.

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