26 results for Piercy, Gemma Louise

  • The knowledge society and high performance workplace systems: Enhancing worker voice

    Cochrane, William; Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper focuses on an aspect of the ‘Future of Work’. The introduction of high performance workplace systems (hpws) is, in general terms, consistent with the broad thrust of the ‘knowledge society’ debate. The central thesis holds that the introduction of hpws has the potential to enhance ‘worker voice,’ especially in the context of a ‘third way’ political environment that fosters a more tripartite approach to industrial relations. The paper draws on several pieces of research, each of which has its own methodological approach. The discussion of the ‘knowledge society’ debate and the ‘third way’ political context draws on policy analyses undertaken by Law and Piercy. The body of the paper is based on a survey by Law of union members engaged in a hpws in a large NZ dairy factory. That research involved focus groups and a postal survey. Qualitative (write-in) responses were further analysed using a dynamic coding system developed by Law. The findings are consistent with the (US) work of Black and Lynch. With some qualifications, the introduction of hpws has enhanced worker participation. Active union involvement was a positive factor. For a proportion of union members, the introduction of hpws has had positive off-site effects.

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  • Modern Apprenticeships: A third way in industry training?

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2003)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Modern Apprenticeship was one of Labour’s flagship policies to be implemented early in the Coalition Government’s first term. This case study of Modern Apprenticeship investigated the extent to which ‘third way’ rhetoric is present in industry training policy in New Zealand. The paper will compare and contrast the British and New Zealand models of Modern Apprenticeship. The paper concludes by outlining similarities and differences in the two models in order to ascertain the extent to which the model in New Zealand can be described as ‘third way’.

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  • Industry training organisations in changing times: New research possibilities

    Cochrane, William; Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The tertiary education reforms have placed considerable pressure on Industry Training Organisations (ITOs), which are now required to assume “new roles as strategic leaders in skills and training needs for the industries under their coverage” (Ministry of Education 2003a:21). This paper argues that the Statement of Tertiary Education Priorities (STEP) requirement can lead to productive relationships between ITOs and established research organisations. It considers the new context within which ITOs now operate and offers an illustrative case study of the sort of research that can result from collaborative relationships. Specifically, it reports on research commissioned by the New Zealand Industry Training Organisation (NZITO), which covers dairy manufacturing, meat processing, and leather processing, as part of its strategic planning. The research reported includes: an analysis of the industries covered by the NZITO and their economic significance; the impact of an ageing workforce and other demographic on the labour market and its implications for NZITO industries; the impact of technological change on the labour market; and some of the consequences of the continuing integration of the global economy.

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  • The shift from the third way to neo-liberalism: An analysis of the 2010 amendments to the LGA

    Piercy, Gemma Louise; Mackness, Kate; Rarere, Moana; Madley, Brendan (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    • The New Zealand Third Way context • The 2002 Local Government Act (LGA)Case study: OhiwaHarbour Strategy • 2010 and 2012 Amendments to the LGACase study: Social housing • Conclusion

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  • Changing parameters of consultation in local government: loss or gain for democracy?

    Mackness, Kate; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    A key tenet of the Resource Management Act (RMA) when enacted in 1991 was to provide for significant rights of public participation in decision-making processes in district and regional planning processes. The Local Government Act (LGA) when enacted in 2002 continued to extend the mechanisms for public participation in decision-making processes through partnership arrangements and a greater requirement to consult. These provisions recognise the interests of the general public and those specifically affected, as well as enhancing the quality of local decision making. We argue that the reforms to the LGA and the RMA since the election of the National-led government in 2008 have created a policy context where these public participation rights could be eroded. Our textual analysis of the amendments to the legislation demonstrates that the current National-led government’s pursuit of greater efficiency is resulting in reduced consultation under the RMA, and potential opportunities for erosion of public participation to occur under the LGA – although conversely, the greater flexibility also provided may generate new democratic opportunities.

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  • Investigating commentary on the fifth labour-led government’s third way approach

    Piercy, Gemma Louise; Mackness, Kate; Rarere, Moana; Madley, Brendan (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    After the 1999 election of a Labour-led coalition government in Aotearoa New Zealand, a raft of policy reforms adopted characteristics of the ‘Third Way’ ideology promoted by Anthony Giddens. We argue, however, that Third Way characteristics were not implemented in Aotearoa New Zealand without attracting criticism. This article reviews academic analysis and wider commentary on the Third Way in Aotearoa New Zealand, much of which particularly focused on social policy reforms made by the Labour-led coalition government (1999-2008). We have used this literature to identify the varied ways in which the Third Way was defined and the extent to which Third Way ideology was considered to have influenced policy and practice the Aotearoa New Zealand context. Our semi-systematic literature review shows that many commentators argued that New Zealand did indeed implement a policy platform consistent with Third Way ideological characteristics but these were also adapted to the unique context of Aotearoa New Zealand. We explore in detail two key examples of adaptation di scussed in the literature: the Labour-led government’s early focus on reducing inequalities between Māori and non-Māori and on renewing civil society through subsidiarity and a partnership approach.

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