9 results for Potangaroa, Regan, Conference item, 2010

  • Resources and capacity: Lessons learned from post-disaster reconstruction resourcing in Indonesia, China and Australia

    Chang, Yan; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan; Seville, Erica (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Post-disaster reconstruction poses resourcing challenges specific to the construction practitioners and requires constant improvements of the construction industry and of the environment in which it operates. By drawing on in-field surveys and observations in the disaster affected areas in Indonesia, China and Australia, the research examines their respective resourcing practice following a disaster with a particular focus on identifying the resource and capacity constraints that confronted the reconstruction practitioners in a post-disaster situation. This mapping exercise helps draw attention from decision makers and the construction sector to the vulnerable areas in post-disaster reconstruction and also generates lessons and experiences worthy of adoption in other disaster situations. Practical measures are suggested to improve the implementation of physical reconstruction through laws, regulations and policies, along with the according mechanisms in the industry and at a project level.

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  • Post-disaster recovery: Multi-agency leadership and co-ordination

    Beckett, James V.; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Recovery is a vital phase in an emergency management and civil defence cycle aimed towards long-term community resilience. Leadership plays a crucial role in an emergency situation, especially in the response and recovery stages. This research examines the post-disaster rural community contexts of the 2009 Victorian Bushfires to review the leadership that exists in such a complex post-disaster environment. Soft leadership and more technical, task-based management skills are combined to establish the necessary characteristics for effective disaster leadership during a post-disaster recovery. The conclusion is reached that the most effective leadership in a recovery environment combines traits targeted towards achieving the right actions with minimal delay.

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  • Architecture for humanity: Shipping containers as Swiss Army knife

    Lee, Ja Yeun; Potangaroa, Regan (2010-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Surplus commercial shipping containers have re-gained popularity among developed countries recently and are often associated with fashionable, prefabricated second-homes, hotels, and even cities. However, when applied in the context of post-disaster reconstruction, it takes on a new identity as a heroic, “Swiss Army Knife” equivalent of emergency shelter that offers a potential solution to transitional and permanent housing issues in post-disaster reconstruction. In 2009, the University of Auckland in collaboration with Architecture for Humanity (AfH) offered a design studio project to develop shipping containers as prefabricated cores that boil down the vital services for shelter and basic off-grid utilities into as small a package as possible. Twelve post-graduate students from the School of Architecture developed a range of ambitious prefabricated core approaches and variations for recent disasters in twelve different locations covering and in as many climates, cultures and materials. The students faced challenges unique to each situation. Shipping containers were carefully modified for deployment at emergency stage of disaster as a self-sufficient shelter, which was also made adaptable by locals to enable full integration into the urban fabric of their city over time. Local materials and labour may be used to construct structural enclosures and building envelopes, but systems for water, waste, power and ventilation require specialist expertise and non-local components. Prefabricated cores enable such technical systems to be integrated and fabricated off-site and shipped to sites where they can be plugged on-site into a larger building project. Despite the homogenous beginning of a shipping container (the “one size fits all” approach), the potential to package it with useful components make their deployment in disasters an efficient strategy for humanitarian relief work. Enabling self-sufficiency for disaster survivors from early stages of disaster expedites recovery through empowerment and stability.

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  • Earthquake vulnerability of wastewater pumping stations in New Zealand

    Zare, Mohammad R.; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan (2010-09)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    New Zealand is located in an earthquake prone part of the world where earthquakes are the most common natural hazard in New Zealand. Consequently, earthquake vulnerability especially in lifelines is of great concern of earthquake prone city councils. Wastewater systems as lifelines should be able to withstand earthquakes to have the minimum impact on public health and environmental pollution. Earthquake vulnerability of wastewater pumping stations in 3 earthquake prone cities in New Zealand was assessed in this research. The assessment revealed that the non-structural components are the most vulnerable parts in wastewater pumping stations. Structural vulnerability of wastewater pumping stations is notable and requires an immediate rehabilitation plan.

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  • Planning for social outcomes

    Potangaroa, Regan; Mair, Julie Samia (2010-09-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    There is usually no purposeful connection between the physical planning of refugee camps and the social outcomes for those living in these camps with each being treated separately by independent groups or more often the case by different organizations. And while there will be some exchange of information, such as the siting of a community office, the two disciplines remain separate and separated. However, recent work by Mair et al. (Mair and Mair, 2003) suggests that there are potentially more links and connections than presently realized and certainly beyond the simple planning suggested above. This paper presents the results of a field trial of an Opportunity Matrix for Sexual Violence Against Women and Children in Refugee Camps developed by Dugan (now Mair) et al. and applied for the first time in Ardamata Camp in El Geneinna, (the provincial capital of West Darfur) in June/July 2004. Although this was not a refugee situation but rather an internally displaced person (IDP) situation, the Opportunity Matrix (OM) can be applied in IDP situations as well. The results from this field trial (albeit small) support Mair’s position that the physical and administrative environment can affect social outcomes. Whereas further field trials are necessary, the results show that planners need to better understand this linkage so as to bring about more effective planning changes for better social outcomes.

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  • Spatial syntax analysis of tent layouts

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chan, Tao (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Spatial Syntax is a set of concepts and techniques for the analysis of spatial configurations that were originally developed by Hillier and Hanson in the late 1980’s (Space Syntax, 2009). They were intended to be a tool to assist architects and town planners in the modelling of social effects of the built environment. The analysis starts with a grid layout of the study area and then uses one of 3 generally accepted spatial concepts together with one of 3 analysis techniques. The paper uses a visibility concept and a depth/distance technique to analyse operational tent layouts commonly used by United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and others proposed in the shelter literature. While many advantages have been claimed for different layouts (such as the community and security arrangements for a “U” shaped tent layout over a street/row approach) none appear to have been researched, surveyed or tested. Such questions are central to the idea of community, security and protection and ultimately well being of those that Agencies seek to assist.

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  • The spatial syntax of Iraqi refugee housing in Syria

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chan, Tao (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Space Syntax developed from the work of Benedikt in 1979 and then Hillier and Hanson in 1984. Benedikt created visual maps within building plans by drawing the contours of equal visual areas calling the resulting map an ‘isovist field.’ He theorized that these isovists fields would correspond to the pattern of people’s movements and provide insight into how a space was navigated. This theory was confirmed by Hillier who together with Hanson went on to develop the approach by using a grid of nodes. Lines drawn from each node established the connectedness of that point to the remainder of the grid points within the space being studied. And it was from this that the visual graph analysis approach and spatial syntax emerged. The spatial tool has the ability to draw out spatial patterns from 2D floor plans that would not otherwise be easily quantified and it is this quality that is the subject of this paper. The paper applies the approach to the last 5 remaining households at El Hol camp in Syria of refugees from the 1990-91 Gulf conflict. The basic house data was collected in February 2003. The results support the idea of an “intimacy gradient” being inherent in the building design which may not have been otherwise identified. And that this gradient appears to be important, it is certainly vernacular, extremely subtle and perhaps fundamental at least to the design of this housing. It will be interesting to compare and discuss whether that was the case for housing in Gujarat and other areas. This paper seeks to extend earlier qualitative work on “Talking to the Building” presented at i-Rec 2008 and the use of Quality of Life surveys to measure whether people were “happy” presented at both i-Rec 2006 and 2008 as a way to understand and also verify the needs of the building’s occupants.

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  • Structural quality control in the field

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chang, Yan; Zuo, Kelvin; Wilkinson, Suzanne (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The quality control of structural elements for post disaster reconstruction in the field is problematic. Test facilities are often remote, training can be inadequate and the attitude of suppliers and contractors can be negative towards such controls resulting in less then adequate construction. This paper outlines several techniques that have been used to address such issues that included of the following: • Foundation checking using scala penetrometer testing • Concrete strength testing using rebound hammer testing • Rebar placement using cover meters These are all tests that can be completed in the field, give immediate test results that can be repeated if required and provide positive evidence for the doubting suppliers and contractors. Such tests have been used in housing projects in Banda Aceh, Sri Lanka and India with this paper focusing on the context in Banda Aceh, Indonesia.

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  • The integration of seismic resistant design & construction into the Diploma of Associate Engineering DAE (Civil) curriculum in Pakistan

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chhetri, Vickram; Timarzi, Irshad (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The 8th October 2005 Kashmir Earthquake exposed the vulnerability of Pakistan’s building stock with the collapse of both public and private buildings. Whilst appropriate building codes are now being developed and introduced, the codes alone are not going to solve the problem unless (and until) technicians and masons develop the knowledge, skills and appreciation for the design and construction of buildings in a seismically safe manner. The importance of these two groups of people is much of that vulnerability was in rural housing and it is these two groups (and in particular masons) who will deal directly with this issue. This paper outlines the development of a seismic module to assist Pakistani Educational Authorities to integrate seismic resistant design and construction components into the curricula of the Diploma of Associate Engineering DAE (Civil) and in particular how the curricula addressed: • the need to make houses and buildings actually conform to the codes. • the need for seismic resistant design and construction components for mainly nonengineered buildings in Pakistan. The process and strategy used for this module in Pakistan will have applications in other earthquake prone developing countries.

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