3 results for Pringle, R

  • What makes good sport history?: reflections on the crisis of legitimation and the politics of knowledge construction [Paper in special issue: Sport History and the Cultural Turn. Booth, Douglas and Phillips, Murray (eds)]

    Pringle, R (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Epistemological polemics surround the objectives of sport history, the role of theory, styles of representation and the interpretation of 'facts'. Numerous commentators have reported that these debates have intensified since sport history's belated interest in what has been termed the cultural, linguistic or narrative turns. Although clear distinctions exist between these various 'turns' they have all occurred in relation to the prime challenge of postmodernism: which in relation to history accepts 'that it is impossible to penetrate a somehow pure historical "reality" and/or "past"' and, therefore, sources of historical data cannot be treated as trustworthy indicators of an assumed social reality. Corresponding with these debates has been the recognition that sport historians judge the quality of research in diverse ways in relation to different research paradigms. Reconstructionists, for example, criticise constructionists for employing social theory, claiming that theory distorts the way empirical facts are understood. Conversely, deconstructionists criticise both reconstructionists and constructionists for making authoritative truth claims and promoting singular interpretations of history.

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  • Masculinities, sport and power: A critical comparison of Gramscian and Foucauldian inspired theoretical tools

    Pringle, R (2005)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although feminists have increasingly found Foucauldian theorising effective for examining issues associated with female sport and exercise contexts, the Gramscian-inspired concept of masculine hegemony remains dominant in masculinities research. This article compares and contrasts the theoretical tools stemming from the writings of Gramsci and Foucault with respect to their use for examining sport and masculinities. It is argued that it is troublesome to combine Foucauldian and Gramscian concepts without acknowledging fundamental theoretical differences. Questions of concern are also discussed with respect to how the concept of hegemonic masculinity has been used in studies of sport and masculinities. It is suggested that the concept of masculine hegemony does not simply refer to a dominant form of masculinity but is underpinned by particular understandings of power that some may find problematic. The conclusion discusses how Foucauldian theorising could be advantageous for future examinations of sport and masculinities.

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  • Classic Book Review: Re-reading Deleuze and Guattari???s A Thousand Plateaus

    Pringle, R; Landi, Dillon (2017)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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