17 results for Pringle, Richard

  • Foucauldian examinations of sport, sexuality and gender.

    Pringle, Richard (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    French scholar Michel Foucault is regarded by many as one of the most influential social theorists of contemporary times and his oeuvre is well recognised within sport sociology. In presenting a keynote address to delegates attending the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport annual conference, for example, Toby Miller (2010) rhetorically asked: ‘Is anyone here who is not a paid up member of the Foucault fan club?’ His question reflects the contemporary significance of Foucauldian theorising within sociological studies of sport but also the now seemingly conventional manner within which Foucault is drawn upon.

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  • Bourdieu comes off the bench: A reflexive analysis of the circulation of ideas within the sociology of sport field

    Pringle, Richard (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Critical pedagogical strategies to disrupt weight bias in schools

    Pringle, Richard; Powell, Darren (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Despite the scientific uncertainties concerning diet, body composition and health, many teachers believe that the world is in the grips of an “obesity epidemic” and it is their duty to promote the virtues of physical activity and the problems of fat. Although many of these teachers are well intended, concern has been raised that the simplistic messages promoted in schools can act to position fat people as unhealthy and even, at times, as moral failures. In this chapter, we begin by providing the results from an examination of two elementary schools that illustrate how children are taught about fatness and fitness and how they subsequently make simplistic and problematic understandings about bodies and health. Given our concerns about weight bias and the body composition/health messages circulating in schools, we reveal strategies employed in the education of teachers at a tertiary institute that aim to disrupt mainstream understandings of the relationships between fatness and health. We do so with the intent to promote a more respectful and nuanced way of teaching about bodies, fitness, physical activity, health, and fatness within schools.

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  • Foucault, Sport and Exercise: Power, Knowledge and Transforming the Self

    Markula, P; Pringle, Richard (2006)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    "This book explores how Foucauldian theory can inform our understanding of the body, domination, identity and freedom as experienced through sport and exercise. The book considers cultures and experiences in sports, exercise and fitness, coaching and health promotion."--BOOK JACKET.

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  • Competing Discourses: Narratives of a fragmented self, manliness and rugby union

    Pringle, Richard (2001)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this article I argue that sports of violence, such as rugby union, can provide a discursive space that allows for production and resistance to dominant discourses of manliness. I do so, in part, by presenting narratives of self to reveal how competing discourses surrounded my youth participation in rugby union in a manner that made it difficult to maintain a coherent sense of self. Through these narratives, I hope that readers can empathize with the tensions and contradictions I faced as a `rugby boy'. In addition, I draw on Foucaultian concepts to illustrate how the discourses that initially helped constitute my sense of self also provided a starting point for my eventual resistance against hypermasculine values. In this sense, I highlight how relationships between discourse, power and subjectivities are unstable.

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  • ‘It gives me fever’: An affective embodied reading of Runner’s World

    Pringle, Richard (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper, I explore the pains and pleasures of endurance running via an affective analysis of Runner’s World, a glossy magazine devoted to those who run long-distances. My examination, rather than asking the more typical socio-cultural studies questions, such as “how does this magazine contribute to the marginalization of certain individuals or groups?”, considers Runner’s World as a “kind of actor with the power to affect its audiences” (Paasonen, 2010, p. 59). More specifically, I analyse how Runner’s World evokes the corporeality of running and mobilizes various affects and emotions.

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  • ‘Muscles for Motherhood’: A Genealogical Analysis of Medicalised Ways of Knowing Female Footballers in New Zealand, 1921 and 1973–1975

    Cox, BD; Pringle, Richard (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Michel Foucault argued that females gradually became integrated into the sphere of medical practices through a process which he termed as a ‘hysterization of women's bodies’ (Foucault, The History of Sexuality, Volume One: An Introduction, New York: Pantheon Books, 1978, 104). In this article, we draw on Foucault to examine how women's bodies, exercise and motherhood impacted on the historical development of female football in New Zealand within two time periods (1921 and 1973–1975). Employing his genealogical framework, we analyze newspaper reports, historical documents and conducted in-depth interviews to demonstrate how medical/scientific discourses both constrained and enabled the participation of women in football. We conclude that while medical knowledge was used to publicly disqualify the legitimacy of the female footballer in 1921, and hence her abrupt disappearance from the sporting realm, the absence of such medical knowledge in the early 1970s, combined with societal changes associated with second wave feminism, paved the way for the eventual ‘normalization’ of female football in New Zealand.

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  • Review of the book The philosophy of physical education: a new perspective, by Stephen Stolz

    Pringle, Richard (2015)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Informing Coaches’ Practices: Towards an Application of Foucault’s Ethics

    Denison, J; Pringle, Richard; Cassidy, T; Hessian, P (2015-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Progress and improvement in sport is often the result of some type of change. However, change for change sake is not always beneficial. Therefore, to be an effective ‘change agent’ a coach must be able to problematize his or her actions and assess why or why not a change might be needed. Accordingly, helping coaches become active problematizers is vital to the change process. Toward this end, we present in this paper our reflections as coach developers and coaches who considered how to apply Michel Foucault’s understanding of ethics to make self-change a positive force for enhancing athletes’ experiences. We then conclude by suggesting how coach developers might begin to incorporate Foucault’s work into the development of coaches capable of producing change that matters. Keywords: coach development, critical thinking, the body

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  • Competing obesity discourses and critical challenges for health and physical educators

    Pringle, Richard; Pringle, D (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Health and physical education teachers have become subject to epistemological and ethical tensions associated with competing obesity and physical activity discourses. The dominating obesity discourse, underpinned by truth claims from science, encourages educators to pathologise fatness, treat exercise as a medicine and survey student activity levels. A reverse obesity discourse, however, argues that obesity concerns are socially constructed in response to a moral panic surrounding youth lifestyles and these concerns are, of themselves, harmful for health. Educators, accordingly, are drawn in different directions with respect to how to manage their governance role of student bodies and the dissemination of health and physical activity knowledge. In this paper, we discuss this dilemma and draw from Foucauldian and Derridian theorising to offer one potential educational strategy. This strategy rests on the idea that knowledge is not fixed but fluid and, therefore, critical education is less about the transmission of knowledge and more about equipping students with skills so that they can critically engage with uncertainty and negotiate the complexities of social life.

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  • Fear and loathing on the sport field: Masculinities, social transformation and creative teaching strategies

    Pringle, Richard (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The apparent links between sport and masculinities has generated critical concern from a number of educationalists, feminists and sport sociologists. These concerns have inspired the development of various pedagogical strategies for transforming understandings and practices of gender within educational settings. This paper reviews the connections between sport and masculinities, and contributes to the development of a critical pedagogy by illustrating how the creative arts can be used within tertiary educational settings to raise awareness of the gendering influence of sport. I detail how I drew on Foucauldian theorizing and the work of Laurel Richardson to develop a teaching strategy, involving the use of dance and a 'collective story', to promote marginalised knowledge and stir political emotions. I present a shortened version of the collective story and discuss its impact on tertiary students. I conclude by encouraging other educators to draw on the creative arts as tools for promoting discussion, legitmating the voice of the 'other' and to encourage an empathetic response.

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  • Defamiliarizing heavy-contact sports: A critical examination of rugby, discipline, and pleasure

    Pringle, Richard (2009)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Pleasure can be regarded as a productive force in the constitution of the social sig-nificance of sport and desiring sport subjects. The organization and use of sport plea-sure has been a relatively marginalized topic of examination. To promote and examine sport pleasure, I conducted semistructured interviews with seven passionate rugby players. Transcripts were analyzed via Foucauldian theorizing and revealed the inter-twined workings of technologies of dominance and self in the constitution of rugby pleasures. As a strategy to defamiliarize and disrupt habitual and uncritical accep-tance of rugby aggression, I argued that rugby pleasures were akin to sadomasochism. Rugby can be understood as a taboo-breaking game associated with transparent rela-tions of power connected with the pleasure induced from physical domination and the fear of pain.

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  • ‘No rugby—no fear’: collective stories, masculinities and transformative possibilities in schools

    Pringle, Richard (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper contributes to the development of a critical pedagogy in physical education (PE) by illustrating how ‘collective stories’ can be used within schools to help raise awareness of the relationships between sport, PE and gendered identities. A collective story, a concept developed by Laurel Richardson, aims to give voice to those silenced or marginalised by dominant cultural narratives and promote transformative possibilities. Within this paper I present a collective story of eight men's school experiences of rugby union to illustrate the difficulty of negotiating comforting stories of self in the face of rugby's cultural dominance within New Zealand. I detail the representational issues associated with constructing the story and my experience of presenting it to school students to assess whether it encouraged an empathetic response and disrupted romanticised ways of conceptualising the links between sport and masculinities. I conclude by discussing how I used the collective story, as a pedagogical tool, to examine the viability of introducing Foucauldian strategies to help students think critically.

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  • The politics of pleasure: An ethnographic examination exploring the dominance of the multi-activity sport-based physical education model

    Gerdin, G??ran; Pringle, Richard (2017)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Kirk warns that physical education (PE) exists in a precarious situation as the dominance of the multi-activity sport-techniques model, and its associated problems, threatens the long-term educational survival of PE. Yet he also notes that although the model is problematic it is highly resistant to change. In this paper, we draw on the results of a year-long visual ethnography at an all-boys secondary school in Aotearoa New Zealand to examine the workings of power that legitimate this model of PE. Our findings illustrate that the school conflates PE and sport, to position PE as an appropriate masculine endeavour and valued source of enjoyment, as it articulates with good health, social development and competitiveness. We argue that student experiences of pleasure within PE???as co-constitutive with discourses of fitness, health, sport and masculinity???(re)produce the multi-activity sport-based form of PE as educationally appropriate and socioculturally relevant, thus making the model somewhat resistant to change. We stress that our study should not be read as a vindication of this PE model.

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  • Negotiating masculinities via the moral problematization of sport

    Pringle, Richard; Hickey, C (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Researchers have raised concerns about the construction of dangerous/problematic masculinities within sporting fratriarchies. Yet little s known about how malesport enthusiasts???critical of hypermasculine performances???negotiate their involvement in sport. Our aim was to examine how males negotiated sporting tensions and how these negotiations shaped their (masculine) selves. We drew on Foucault (1992) to analyze how interviewees problematized their respective sport culture in relation to the sexualization of females, public drunkenness and excessive training demands. Results illustrated how the interviewees produced selves, via the moral problematization of sport, that rejected the values or moral codes of hypermasculinity in attempts to create ethical masculinities. We suggest that a proliferation of techniques of self that resist hypermasculine forms of subjection could be one form of ethical response to the documented problems surrounding masculinities and sport.

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  • Defamiliarizing Heavy-Contact Sports: A Critical Examination of Rugby, Discipline, and Pleasure

    Pringle, Richard (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Pleasure can be regarded as a productive force in the constitution of the social significance of sport and desiring sport subjects. The organization and use of sport pleasure has been a relatively marginalized topic of examination. To promote and examine sport pleasure, I conducted semistructured interviews with seven passionate rugby players. Transcripts were analyzed via Foucauldian theorizing and revealed the intertwined workings of technologies of dominance and self in the constitution of rugby pleasures. As a strategy to defamiliarize and disrupt habitual and uncritical acceptance of rugby aggression, I argued that rugby pleasures were akin to sadomasochism. Rugby can be understood as a taboo-breaking game associated with transparent relations of power connected with the pleasure induced from physical domination and the fear of pain.

    View record details
  • 'No rugby - no fear': collective stories, masculinities and transformative possibilities in schools

    Pringle, Richard (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper contributes to the development of a critical pedagogy in physical education (PE) by illustrating how 'collective stories' can be used within schools to help raise awareness of the relationships between sport, PE and gendered identities. A collective story, a concept developed by Laurel Richardson, aims to give voice to those silenced or marginalised by dominant cultural narratives and promote transformative possibilities. Within this paper I present a collective story of eight men's school experiences of rugby union to illustrate the difficulty of negotiating comforting stories of self in the face of rugby's cultural dominance within New Zealand. I detail the representational issues associated with constructing the story and my experience of presenting it to school students to assess whether it encouraged an empathetic response and disrupted romanticised ways of conceptualising the links between sport and masculinities. I conclude by discussing how I used the collective story, as a pedagogical tool, to examine the viability of introducing Foucauldian strategies to help students think critically. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]; Copyright of Sport, Education & Society is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

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