4 results for Pulford, J

  • Evaluation of Problem Gambling Intervention Services: Stages One and Two Final Report

    Bellringer, M; Coombes, R; Garrett, N; Nahi, P; Pulford, J; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background The Ministry of Health is responsible for the funding and coordination of problem gambling services and activities in New Zealand. This includes the funding of a national telephone helpline, two national face-to-face counselling services and several regional treatment providers which include Maori and Pacific specific services (Asian specific services are provided as a division of one of the national face-to-face treatment providers) (Ministry of Health, 2008a). From 2008, Ministry funded face-to-face problem gambling treatment providers have received specific training around Ministry expectations for service practice requirements (e.g. the types of intervention that will be funded and the processes expected within those interventions as well as for referrals for co-existing issues), and expectations around data collection, management and information submission to the Ministry. The Ministry has also identified specific sets of screening instruments to be used with clients, which vary depending on whether the client is receiving a brief or full-length intervention, or is a problem gambler or family/whanau member (‘significant other’) of a gambler. These screening instruments came into use in 2008, with different sets of instruments having been used previously. At the present time, the effectiveness of the current problem gambling treatment services is largely unknown, as is the optimal intervention process for different types of client. Whilst this sort of information can ultimately only be ascertained through rigorously conducted effectiveness studies (randomised controlled trials) (Westphal & Abbott, 2006), an evaluation (process, impact and outcome) of services could provide indications as to optimal treatment pathways and approaches for problem gamblers and affected others, as well as identifying successful strategies currently in existence and areas for improvement in current service provision. In September 2008, the Gambling and Addictions Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Problem gambling: Evaluation of problem gambling intervention services. This project focused on four priority areas: 1.) Review and analysis of national service statistics and client data to inform workforce development, evaluation of Ministry systems and processes, and other related aspects 2.) Process and outcome evaluation of the effect of different pathways to problem gambling services on client outcomes and delivery 3.) Process and outcome evaluation of distinct intervention services 4.) Process and outcome evaluation of the roll-out and implementation of Facilitation Services

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  • Problem Gambling - Barriers to Help-seeking Behaviours (Final Report)

    Bellringer, M; Pulford, J; Abbott, M; DeSouza, R; Clarke, D (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: In New Zealand, as elsewhere, only a small proportion of problem gamblers seek formal help for their gambling problems. In particular, Pacific peoples appear to be significantly underrepresented relative to general population prevalence estimates from the 1999 national survey (Abbott & Volberg, 2000). There also appears to be male under-representation, especially in the case of new Maori clients, and an over-representation of females and Pakeha/Europeans seeking help for someone else’s gambling (Ministry of Health, 2006). Thus, increased understanding of the motivations and barriers for help-seeking behaviours is required. In March 2006, the Gambling Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Problem gambling - Barriers to help seeking behaviours. The aim of the project was to describe and understand barriers and enablers to help-seeking, and the experiences when seeking help, of people experiencing gambling harm and of their families/whanau.

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  • Evaluation of Problem Gambling Intervention Services: Stage Three Final Report

    Bellringer, M; Coombes, R; Pulford, J; Garrett, N; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The Ministry of Health is responsible for the funding and coordination of problem gambling services and activities in New Zealand. This includes the funding of a national telephone helpline, two national face-to-face counselling services and several regional treatment providers which include Maori and Pacific specific services (Asian specific services are provided as a division of one of the national face-to-face treatment providers) (Ministry of Health, 2008a). From 2008, the Ministry of Health funded face-to-face problem gambling treatment providers have received specific training around the Ministry of Health expectations for service practice requirements (e.g. the types of intervention that will be funded and the processes expected within those interventions as well as for referrals for co-existing issues), and expectations around data collection, management and information submission to the Ministry of Health. The Ministry of Health has also identified specific sets of screening instruments to be used with clients, which vary depending on whether the client is receiving a Brief or Full-length intervention, or is a problem gambler or family/whanau member („significant other‟) of a gambler. These screening instruments came into use in 2008, with different sets of instruments having been used previously. At the present time, the effectiveness of the current problem gambling treatment services is largely unknown, as is the optimal intervention process for different types of client. Whilst this sort of information can ultimately only be ascertained through rigorously conducted effectiveness studies (randomised controlled trials) (Westphal & Abbott, 2006), an evaluation (process, impact and outcome) of services could provide indications as to optimal treatment pathways and approaches for problem gamblers and affected others, as well as identifying successful strategies currently in existence nationally and internationally and areas for improvement in current service provision. In September 2008, the Gambling and Addictions Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Evaluation of problem gambling intervention services. This project was to focus on four priority areas: 1.) Review and analysis of national service statistics and client data to inform workforce development, evaluation of the Ministry of Health systems and processes, and other related aspects 2.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of the effect of different pathways to problem gambling services on client outcomes and delivery 3.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of distinct intervention services 4.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of the roll-out and implementation of Facilitation Services2

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  • Formative Investigation Into the Effectiveness of Gambling Venue Exclusion Processes in New Zealand

    Bellringer, M; Coombes, R; Pulford, J; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Exclusion of patrons from gambling venues is potentially an effective early intervention for minimising harm from excessive gambling since it may contribute to the treatment and/or recovery of people with developing and established gambling problems. Internationally, some jurisdictional regulations mandate „imposed exclusion‟ programmes, where gamblers with problems are identified by venue staff (usually casinos) and barred from gambling at those venues. In other jurisdictions, „self-exclusion‟ programmes are in place, where gamblers may request that they be banned from the venue, removed from its mailing list and potentially face legal consequences if they re-enter the premises. Traditionally, such self-exclusion programmes have been operated by casinos but increasingly are being required for clubs and pubs where electronic gaming machines are located. In New Zealand, The Gambling Act 2003 stipulates that both imposed- and self- exclusion measures should be operated. The Act refers to these exclusion measures as an "order‟ but colloquial use of the term "contract‟ has been used throughout this report due to the word usage amongst participants in this research and in the literature. However, there is a paucity of research regarding the effectiveness of gambling venue exclusion processes per se and even less information outside the casino environment. In addition, the effectiveness of the particular processes in force in New Zealand has not been evaluated. Currently, different processes are operated by different venues, for example with variations in minimum and maximum exclusion periods, and different requirements for re-entering the gambling venue when an exclusion contract comes to an end. Given that exclusion programmes consume private and public resources and are a legislated requirement, it is important that their effectiveness be ascertained. This will have substantial implications in terms of the potential to improve existing processes to ensure maximum minimisation of harms from gambling. In August 2008, the Gambling and Addictions Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Formative investigation into the effectiveness of gambling venue exclusion processes in New Zealand. The purpose of this project was two-fold: a) to ascertain the most suitable methodology and processes for researching venue excluders in order to robustly evaluate the effectiveness of current venue exclusion processes, and b) to gain some initial insight into the effectiveness of gambling (particularly electronic gaming machine and casino) venue exclusion processes in New Zealand.

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