7 results for Book, 1960

  • Commerce Review: 1869–1969 Centennial of the University of Otago

    (1969)

    Book
    University of Otago

    The Otago Commerce Students' Association is pleased to present this magazine, The " COMMERCE REVIEW," in the Centennial Year of the University of Otago, as a record of the development and progress since its inception in 1912, of the Faculty of Commerce. It is perhaps important as a precedent for there is to date, no similar documentation… FROM THE PRESIDENT This magazine, the brainchild of the 1968 Association Committee, is published this year as our contribution to the University Centennial celebrations. Depending upon popular demand, an annual publication may be produced in the future, as a year-book of light-hearted vein… THE FACULTY OF COMMERCE —A History and A Tribute By R. A. Sinclair History is marked in moments, and for the sake of indulgent readers, I have accorded emphasis on significant periods rather than providing yearly surveys of all the happenings. For those omissions, some inadvertent, some of necessity, I express my regrets. There are three parts: the foundations, the middle years, and the boom period in which we find ourselves now… THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION By R. A. Strang and E. S. Edgar Founding to World War II The Otago University Commerce Faculty Students' Association was founded shortly after classes in commercial subjects began at the University in 1912. The first president was Mr Owen Wilkinson and the students were immediately involved in the sporting and other affairs of the University… EDUCATION FOR ACCOUNTANCY By 5. A. Valentine, B.Com., F.C.A. The Commerce Faculty at the University of Otago has played an important role in accountancy education in New Zealand. In Dunedin, a higher proportion of students entering the accountancy profession attend University and complete a Commerce Degree than in any other city in the country. The main reason for this situation is that the accountancy courses and teaching at the University have developed to meet the changing requirements of this modern age… THE CENTENNIAL OPEN LECTURE-JULY 24, 1969 MR S. J. R. CHATTEN THE ROLE OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW ZEALAND By S. J. R. Chatten, F.I.A., A.C.I.I. (London) Many of the large financial institutions in N.Z. are celebrating their centenaries at about this time and it seems appropriate to address a gathering of commerce students at a lecture to mark the Centenary of the University of Otago, on the role of the financial institutions in the development of New Zealand… THE COMMERCE COURSE-RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT By T. K. Cowan, M.Com., F.C.A. The Commerce Faculty owes its beginnings to the initiative and vigour of some Otago men such as Mr Peter Barr who played a leading role in the sound establishment of the New Zealand Society of Accountants. Until quite recently, its main role was to provide education in professional subjects for those desiring admission to the accountancy profession. It did this very economically indeed through evening and early morning classes taught by part-time staff drawn from the accountancy and legal professions. The final examinations set by the University of New Zealand were really professional examinations set and marked by practising accountants and lawyers. Some 80-90% of the students were interested in attaining admission to the New Zealand Society of Accountants rather than in completing a degree in Commerce… GALLERY THE DEANS… SOME PROMINENT LECTURERS…

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  • Bignoniaceae

    Sykes, W. R. (1966)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    Studies of cultivated plants in New Zealand ; 1.

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  • Control of introduced mammals in New Zealand

    Howard, Walter E. (1965)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    New Zealand has a multiplicity of important ecologically challenging, animal-control problems that must be seen to be believed. They are the consequence of intentionally introducing a number of mammals for sport, food, fur, or, mistakenly, as predators of the introduced rabbits. These introduced mammals have upset the natural stability of the habitats over large areas by destroying vegetation, thus also causing extensive erosion. The principal reasons for the destructiveness of the exotic big game animals, fur bearers, and wild pigs and goats to certain habitats in New Zealand are (1) some of the soils are highly susceptible to erosion, (2) the mountainous country often gets high intensity rainfall, and (3) many of the endemic plants have little innate resistance to heavy, selective, grazing or browsing. As a result of these introductions, an irreversible change in the composition of the vegetation has occurred throughout many of the mountain ranges. However, where enough soil has remained, and where browse-resistant and unpalatable plants have replaced adequately those destroyed by the browsing mammals, a new and stable equilibrium of the animal-vegetation-soil complex has developed. But on some mountains both the A and B soil horizons have been lost. It appears that the problem species of introduced mammals cannot be eradicated from New Zealand. Consequently, it would seem to be more prudent from a long term viewpoint to accept the concomitant vegetational changes, especially where they do not adversely affect watershed conservation. Therefore, a logical long-term objective toward the noxious animal problem is to strive for habitat stability, whether by reseeding, shooting by private hunters, or, wherever the exotic animals have upset seriously the soil-vegetation stability of the original communities, by intensive animal control by government personnel. Better means of either repelling troublesome mammals or of achieving more effective reduction of their numbers with chemicals and other means are urgently required now to protect critical areas and localised sites where the introduced mammals are still depleting the land or are maintaining it in an unstable condition. In the future we must learn to tolerate deer in some areas while at the same time controlling them more effectively in others.

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  • Soil Bureau handbook

    New Zealand. Soil Bureau (1962)

    Book
    Landcare Research

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  • Triennial report, 1960-62

    New Zealand. Botany Division (1963)

    Book
    Landcare Research

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  • The ecology of mustelids in New Zealand

    Marshall, William H. (1963)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    Reports on preliminary studies of the ecology of mustelids in New Zealand made during 1960-61.

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  • Soils of lower Shotover catchment

    McCraw, J. D. (1966)

    Book
    Landcare Research

    Reprinted from the Shotover River survey (Otago Catchment). Otago Catchment Board Bulletin no. 2, 1966. Includes soil map.

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