319 results for Book, 2010

  • Outdoor education in Aotearoa New Zealand: A new vision for the twenty first century

    Irwin, D.; Straker, J.; Hill, A. (2011)

    Book
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Outdoor education in a variety of guises has a rich history in Aotearoa New Zealand, dating back more than 100 years. Learning experiences in the outdoors have a strong and oft en much-loved place in our collective education memories, from environmental field trips in the mountain valleys of Aoraki/Mount Cook to school camps at Port Waikato; from primary school stream study and restoration projects to multiday alpine journeys for tertiary students. However, as we move into the second decade of the twenty-fi rst century, the world we live in is vastly diff erent from the one in which many of us developed those memories. What does that mean for education, and more specifi cally, what does that mean for educational experiences that take place in outdoor environments? This book attends to these questions from a forward looking position. It shares a vision of outdoor education which moves beyond the proud histories of twentieth century school camps, fi eld studies and outdoor pursuits to one which addresses the exigent and contemporary issues confronting educators and students alike. The twenty-first century seems to be characterised by great uncertainty and rapid change. Issues such as climate change, growing inequality between the haves and have-nots, and rising levels of consumption and waste are increasingly entering the fray of our everyday lived realities. So too are bigger (or indeed smaller), better, and faster technologies. Cultural norms are constantly being challenged, contested, and reshaped. How then does outdoor education wrestle with and speak to these and other issues?

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  • Evolutions or Revolutions? Interaction and Transformation at the 'Transition' in Island Melanesia

    Cath-Garling, Stephanie (2017)

    Book
    University of Otago

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  • Antidiets of the Avant-Garde: From Futurist Cooking to Eat Art

    (2010)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Caringly dismantling the misunderstanding that has often limited modernist aesthetics—namely, that avant-garde art is to be ascetic and skeptical of bodily experience—Cecilia Novero’s impressive study takes a more playfully Nietzschean approach by demonstrating that the European avant-garde cannot properly be understood without appreciating the role that allegories and material practices of incorporation play within it. This book is a delicious morsel. Gerhard Richter, University of California-Davis The history of taste has long harbored a repressed field of knowledge, that of cuisine, which had been metaphorized out of existence in traditional aesthetic theory. Today, as the culinary has finally found its place in theoretical and museological endeavors, certain works promise to become the foundation of a new, pluridisciplinary field that includes gastronomy. Among them is Antidiets of the Avant-Garde. It may be said that this book illuminates the culinary unconscious of our modernity. It is essential reading for all those interested in modern art, and for all those who love to eat. Allen S. Weiss, author of Feast and Folly: Cuisine, Intoxication, and the Poetics of the Sublime In this interdisciplinary study, Novero provides a detailed analysis of how food and food-related activities provide rich context for explorations of the blurring of boundaries between art and daily life. Choice Antidiets is certainly successful in capturing both the avant-garde’s interdiscipliarity and its multimediality. And scholars of the avant-garde will discover in Antidiets a unique history not yet told in any national or international context. Novero’s monograph on the intersection of food, the avant-garde and the consuming human body achieves a great deal. German Quarterly In her sophisticated and rigorous study, Cecilia Novero provides readers with a novel understanding of the objectives and achievements but also the contradictions and shortcomings of twentieth-century avant-garde movements. It will be difficult for future avant-garde research to ignore this study. Monatshefte Simultaneously accessible and thought provoking. Parallax

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  • Management of Osteoarthritis: A guide to non-surgical intervention

    Abbott, J. Haxby (2014-07-16)

    Book
    University of Otago

    The MOA trial (Management of Osteoarthritis, or Maimoatanga Mate Köiwi) was a randomised clinical trial that aimed to investigate the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of both a multi-modal, individualised, supervised exercise therapy programme, and an individualised manual therapy programme, compared with usual medical care, for the management of pain and disability in adults with hip or knee OA. The first chapter of this book provides an introduction to OA and its management. The subsequent chapters provide the detailed treatment protocols delivered in the MOA trial.

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  • China on Video: Smaller Screen Realities

    Voci, Paola (2010)

    Book
    University of Otago

    China On Video is the first in-depth study that examines smaller-screen realities and the important role they play not only in the fast-changing Chinese mediascape, but also more broadly in the practice of experimental and non-mainstream cinema. At the crossroads of several disciplines—film, media, new media, media anthropology, visual arts, contemporary China area studies, and cultural studies--this book reveals the existence of a creative, humorous, but also socially and politically critical "China on video", which locates itself outside of the intellectual discourse surrounding both auteur cinema and digital art.

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  • Health Professionals and Trust: The Cure for Healthcare Law and Policy

    Henaghan, Mark (2012)

    Book
    University of Otago

    An ever increasing number of codes of conduct, disciplinary bodies, ethics committees and bureaucratic policies now prescribe how health professionals and health researchers relate to their patients. In this book, Mark Henaghan argues that the result of this trend towards heightened regulation has been to diminish reliance upon their professional judgment, whilst simultaneously failing to trust patients to make decisions about their own care. This book examines the issue of health professionals and trust comparatively in a number of countries including the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK. The book draws upon historical analysis of legislation, case law, disciplinary proceedings reports, articles in medical and law journals and protocols produced by management teams in hospitals, to illustrate the ways in which there has been a discernible shift away from trust in healthcare professionals. Henaghan argues that this erosion of trust has the potential to dehumanise the unique relationship that has traditionally existed between healthcare professionals and their patients, thereby running the risk of turning healthcare into a mechanistic enterprise controlled by ‘management processes’ rather than a humanistic relationship governed by trust and judgment. This book is an invaluable resource for students and scholars of medical law and medical sociology, public policy-makers and a range of associated professionals, from health-service managers to medical science and clinical researchers.

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  • Campus climate for students with diverse sexual orientations and/or gender identities at the University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand

    Treharne, Gareth; Beres, Melanie; Nicolson, Max; Richardson, Aimee; Ruzibiza, Christian; Graham, Katie; Briggs, Hahna; Ballantyne, Neill (2016)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Background & aims: Despite increasingly positive attitudes towards diversity in sexual orientation and gender identity, university students who identify as lesbian/gay/takatāpui, bisexual/pansexual, trans, asexual, questioning, and/or queer* (LGBTAQ) continue to experience harassment and discrimination on campus to a great extent than students who identify as heterosexual and a binary gender (HAABG). Previous studies, predominantly conducted in the United States, have reported that LGBTAQ students experience harassment, threats, and even physical assault on campus, most commonly from other students. Because of this harassment, it is not surprising that some LGBTAQ students do not disclose their identity on campus for fear of negative consequences. Studies also suggest that support services can act to reduce the occurrence, and the impact, of harassment and discrimination. The main aim of this project was to survey the campus experiences of students attending the University of Otago and to compare the views and experiences of LGBTAQ students and HAABG students in terms of: forms of harassment and discrimination they have faced; fear for safety; concealment of sexual orientation and/or gender identity; views on which groups of people within the LGBTAQ umbrella they perceive as facing harassment on campus; views on organisational responses to LGBTAQ issues; views of the OUSA Queer* Support service; and views on the overall campus climate including climate within classes. Methods & sample: Students registered at the University of Otago were sent an email containing a link to the online survey in April 2014. A total of 1,234 respondents fully completed the survey and were included in the final analysis. Within the total sample, 66.5% of respondents identified as female, 32.5% identified as male, and 1.1% identified as ‘other’ (including trans, genderqueer, and agender individuals). Over two-thirds of respondents identified as HAABG (n = 878, 71.2%), whereas over a quarter (n = 356, 28.8%) identified as LGBAQ and/or reported their gender identity as ‘other’. The survey contained 41 fixed-response questions enquiring about demographics, ‘outness’, experiences of discrimination and harassment, views on likelihood of harassment for groups within the LGBTAQ community, campus responses and support service, and overall campus climate. Comments on respondents’ experiences and the survey itself were requested in two questions at the end of the survey. Results: There were significant difference between LGBTAQ and HAABG respondents on many of the questions. Over a fifth of LGBTAQ respondents reported being out to friends and family (21.4%) and around one in 10 (11.3%) were not out to anyone, compared to the majority of HAABG respondents (87.2%) reporting they were out to all people. Half of LGBTAQ respondents (50.3%) reported they had concealed their sexual orientation/gender identity to avoid intimidation and 31.6% reported they had also avoided disclosing their sexual orientation/gender identity to University staff due to fear of negative outcomes. Most respondents reported they had not been denied opportunities due to their sexual orientation/gender identity (95.9% for LGBTAQ and 98.1% for HAABG) but over 10% of the LGBTAQ respondents reported having felt fearful for their physical safety due to their sexual orientation/gender identity compared to 3.7% of HAABG respondents. A quarter of the LGBTAQ respondents reported experiencing harassment as a result of their sexual orientation/gender identity compared to 5.8% of HAABG respondents. Over 20% of LGBTAQ respondents reported being subjected to derogatory remarks compared to 4.1% of HAABG respondents. Nearly one in six LGBTAQ respondents had received direct or indirect threats (compared to 2.2% of HAABG respondents), and 1.7% had been assaulted (compared to 0.2% of HAABG respondents). LGBTAQ respondents reported that harassment was most likely to occur in a public space on campus (12.6%), while walking on campus (11.2%), or in a hall of residence (8.1%). The most common source of harassment was other students for both LGBTAQ respondents (21.9%) and HAABG respondents (3.3%). The majority of all respondents agreed that the campus is friendly (89.8% of LGBTAQ, 93.2% of HAABG) and respectful (73.1% of LGBTAQ, 82.4% of HAABG). In relation to improvements across campus, respondents expressed disappointment that only two gender options are offered on many University surveys and forms. Respondents also suggested that having more staff LGBTAQ role models and additional support and education for students in residential halls. The majority of all respondents reported they would feel comfortable using gender neutral bathrooms (78.7% of LGBTAQ, 64.6% of HAABG). In relation to support services, around three quarters of respondents agreed that there are visible resources on queer* issues and concerns at the University of Otago and two-thirds of respondents agreed that the OUSA Queer* Support service is inclusive, safe, and supportive. Conclusions & recommendations: The majority of students perceived the University of Otago campus to be friendly, respectful, and communicative, although perceptions were less positive among LGBTAQ students, who were also more likely to fear for their safety. LGBTAQ students were more likely to think there are not enough visible resources about queer* issues on campus but had more favourable perceptions of the OUSA Queer* Support service compared to HAABG students. Female LGBTAQ students were more likely to say they would access the OUSA Queer* Support service. This finding suggests that it may be beneficial to promote OUSA Queer* Support services specifically for students who are male or a non-binary gender. Students who are gay/lesbian/takatāpui and/or have non-binary gender identities were more likely to experience discrimination, fear for their safety, conceal their identities to avoid harassment, and had a less favourable perception of campus responses to harassment. Students with non-binary gender identities were more likely to have been denied opportunities, experienced threats of violence and threats to expose their identity, to have been harassed in a campus office, and had were less likely to have favourable views of campus in terms of friendliness, respectfulness, and communication. The OUSA Queer* Support service aims to provide an inclusive, visible, and responsive service and is using information from this survey in its work with LGBTAQ students and University staff to address harassment and other core issues such as availability of gender-neutral bathrooms. Future campus climate surveys will provide important monitoring of levels of discrimination and the success of efforts to support LGBTAQ students. The two key findings of this survey are that harassment is experienced by one in four LGBTAQ students at the University of Otago within a year, and HAABG students appear to underestimate the likelihood of this harassment. Discrimination and harassment leads around half of LGBTAQ students to conceal their sexual orientation and/or gender identity, with a third avoiding disclosing their sexual orientation and/or gender identity specifically to University staff to avoid negative consequences. Derogatory remarks in public on campus are the most common form of harassment reported by LGBTAQ students and female HAABG students, particularly in the evening, although harassment outside campus was also highlighted. Respondents also reported witnessing harassment but being fearful to intervene. These findings suggest LGBTAQ and HAABG students may benefit from workshops about skills to apply when witnessing or experiencing derogatory remarks or other forms of harassment. Additional advertising of the OUSA Queer* Support service is recommended via posters, social media, and in course resources. Wider efforts are also required to challenge the culture of discrimination towards LGBTAQ people through events to raise awareness throughout the year and in relevant venues, including residential halls.

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  • Su’ena: Five Hundred Years of Interaction in the Eastern Triangle, Solomon Islands

    Walter, Richard; Green, Roger C. (2011)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Pacific Archaeology: Documenting the Past 50,000 Years

    (2013)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Archaeology of the Hohi Mission Station, Volume I: The 2012 Excavations

    Smith, Ian; Middleton, Angela; Garland, Jessie; Woods, Naomi (2012)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • St Matthias Group

    Nevermann, Hans (2010)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Translated by John Dennison

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  • The Right to Food Guidelines, Democracy and Citizen Participation: Country Case Studies

    Cresswell Riol, Katharine S. E. (2017)

    Book
    University of Otago

    It is now more than a decade since the Right to Food Guidelines was negotiated, agreed and adopted internationally by states. This book provides a review of its objectives and the extent of success of its implementation. The focus is on the first key guideline – "Democracy, good governance, human rights and the rule of law" – with an emphasis on civil society participation in global food governance. Case studies of the five BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) are presented. These represent major emerging economies that blur the line between the Global North and South, and exhibit different levels of human rights realization. The book first provides an overview of the right to adequate food, accountability and democracy, and an introduction to the history of the development of the right to adequate food and the Right to Food Guidelines. It presents a historical synopsis of each of the BRICS states’ experience with the right to adequate food and an analysis of their related periodic reporting to the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, as well as a specific assessment of their progress in regard to the first guideline. The discussion then focuses on the effectiveness of the Right to Food Guidelines as both a policy-making and monitoring tool, based on the analysis of the guidelines and the BRICS states.

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  • Media Studies 101

    Pearson, Erika; Taffel, Sy; Nicholls, Brett; Wengenmeir, Martina; Chin, Khin-Wee; Phillips, Hazel; Snowden, Collette; Madill, Bernard; Ross, Jane; Gallagher, Sarah; Fisher, Thelma; Kabir, Shah Nister J.; Ceuterick, Maud; Mettner, Hannah; Urbano, Massimiliana (2014)

    Website
    University of Otago

    Led by Erika Pearson with assistance from Bernard Madill (both from the University of Otago) and featuring contributors from Massey University, University of Canterbury and University of South Australia. "Inspired by similar projects around the world, and supported by funding from Creative Commons, the Media Text Hack Group sought to act as 'curators' of the vast array of information about media and communication, and drew together examples specific to the region ... This first release represents a core of work based on the common curricula of media and communication studies programs across the region. It is hoped that future versions will develop and expand these areas, as well as take advantage of new tools of collaboration and sharing. All are welcome to take, use, recycle and adapt the material under the Creative Commons Attribution licence"--Media release, 13 Feb. 2013

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  • Energy Transitions: Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS)

    Ford, Rebecca; Stephenson, Janet; Brown, Nicholas; Stiehler, Willie (2014)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Home Energy Management (HEM) offers the potential to help manage peak electricity demand and network constraints – crucial for efficient infrastructure – yet to date is underdeveloped in New Zealand. This presentation provides an overview of current and future HEM capabilities, and some of the factors that might affect uptake of such systems in New Zealand. Four key characteristics of HEM systems are identified and used to guide data collection about HEM technologies currently on the market, which are shown to break into 8 different groupings based on their energy management capabilities. These systems offer demand management through feedback and behaviour prompts, remote control, demand response, and scheduling. Additionally, emerging technologies point to a new wave of HEM systems that better leverage smart grid infrastructure. However, uptake and use of such technologies is not guaranteed, and we discuss factors that may influence the success of home energy management.

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  • Transport Transitions in New Zealand: A scoping study

    Ford, Rebecca; Doering, Adam; Stephenson, Janet (2014)

    Book
    University of Otago

    As concerns about energy security and green house gas emissions become more pronounces, establishing an energy-efficient low-carbon transport system has increasingly become a priority for businesses, government and communities. This report sets out to discover the range of agents conducting transport initiatives aligned with these goals, and how their actions might relate to more widespread transition of the transport system.

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  • Energy Cultures: Implications for Policymakers

    Barton, Barry; Blackwell, Sally; Carrington, Gerry; Ford, Rebecca; Lawson, Rob; Stephenson, Janet; Thorsnes, Paul; Williams, John (2013-02)

    Book
    University of Otago

    The Energy Cultures research project (2009-2012) was planned to help inform policy making related to residential energy use and energy efficiency in New Zealand. It sought, in part, to help address the difficulties faced by government agencies in achieving the economically viable potential for residential electricity savings. In particular, the project set out to examine household energy behaviour in relation to space heating and hot water heating, which together account for around 60% of household energy use. The programme was designed as a number of discrete research projects, linked together by the Energy Cultures conceptual framework. This report presents the policy implications of the multiple findings of that research.

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  • A History of Economics and the Development of Commerce Degrees at the University Of Otago 1871–2009

    McLean, Lyall (2011-03)

    Book
    University of Otago

    This book has been compiled by Emeritus Professor Lyall McLean, which is a history of the teaching of Commerce subjects including Economics from 1871-2009. Included in this book are the names of all 19000+ graduates, listed by departments, and 101 photographs including the Professors, Deans, heads of departments and the first PhD graduates of each department.

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  • Nietzsche

    Wicks, Robert (2010)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Urban Morphology, Architectural Typology and Cities in Transition

    Tian, Y; Gu, Kai; Tao, W (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Changing practices for changing times: Past, present and future possibilities for self-study research: Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Self-study of Teacher Education Practices

    Various authors (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

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