17 results for Book, 2016

  • Campus climate for students with diverse sexual orientations and/or gender identities at the University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand

    Treharne, Gareth; Beres, Melanie; Nicolson, Max; Richardson, Aimee; Ruzibiza, Christian; Graham, Katie; Briggs, Hahna; Ballantyne, Neill (2016)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Background & aims: Despite increasingly positive attitudes towards diversity in sexual orientation and gender identity, university students who identify as lesbian/gay/takatāpui, bisexual/pansexual, trans, asexual, questioning, and/or queer* (LGBTAQ) continue to experience harassment and discrimination on campus to a great extent than students who identify as heterosexual and a binary gender (HAABG). Previous studies, predominantly conducted in the United States, have reported that LGBTAQ students experience harassment, threats, and even physical assault on campus, most commonly from other students. Because of this harassment, it is not surprising that some LGBTAQ students do not disclose their identity on campus for fear of negative consequences. Studies also suggest that support services can act to reduce the occurrence, and the impact, of harassment and discrimination. The main aim of this project was to survey the campus experiences of students attending the University of Otago and to compare the views and experiences of LGBTAQ students and HAABG students in terms of: forms of harassment and discrimination they have faced; fear for safety; concealment of sexual orientation and/or gender identity; views on which groups of people within the LGBTAQ umbrella they perceive as facing harassment on campus; views on organisational responses to LGBTAQ issues; views of the OUSA Queer* Support service; and views on the overall campus climate including climate within classes. Methods & sample: Students registered at the University of Otago were sent an email containing a link to the online survey in April 2014. A total of 1,234 respondents fully completed the survey and were included in the final analysis. Within the total sample, 66.5% of respondents identified as female, 32.5% identified as male, and 1.1% identified as ‘other’ (including trans, genderqueer, and agender individuals). Over two-thirds of respondents identified as HAABG (n = 878, 71.2%), whereas over a quarter (n = 356, 28.8%) identified as LGBAQ and/or reported their gender identity as ‘other’. The survey contained 41 fixed-response questions enquiring about demographics, ‘outness’, experiences of discrimination and harassment, views on likelihood of harassment for groups within the LGBTAQ community, campus responses and support service, and overall campus climate. Comments on respondents’ experiences and the survey itself were requested in two questions at the end of the survey. Results: There were significant difference between LGBTAQ and HAABG respondents on many of the questions. Over a fifth of LGBTAQ respondents reported being out to friends and family (21.4%) and around one in 10 (11.3%) were not out to anyone, compared to the majority of HAABG respondents (87.2%) reporting they were out to all people. Half of LGBTAQ respondents (50.3%) reported they had concealed their sexual orientation/gender identity to avoid intimidation and 31.6% reported they had also avoided disclosing their sexual orientation/gender identity to University staff due to fear of negative outcomes. Most respondents reported they had not been denied opportunities due to their sexual orientation/gender identity (95.9% for LGBTAQ and 98.1% for HAABG) but over 10% of the LGBTAQ respondents reported having felt fearful for their physical safety due to their sexual orientation/gender identity compared to 3.7% of HAABG respondents. A quarter of the LGBTAQ respondents reported experiencing harassment as a result of their sexual orientation/gender identity compared to 5.8% of HAABG respondents. Over 20% of LGBTAQ respondents reported being subjected to derogatory remarks compared to 4.1% of HAABG respondents. Nearly one in six LGBTAQ respondents had received direct or indirect threats (compared to 2.2% of HAABG respondents), and 1.7% had been assaulted (compared to 0.2% of HAABG respondents). LGBTAQ respondents reported that harassment was most likely to occur in a public space on campus (12.6%), while walking on campus (11.2%), or in a hall of residence (8.1%). The most common source of harassment was other students for both LGBTAQ respondents (21.9%) and HAABG respondents (3.3%). The majority of all respondents agreed that the campus is friendly (89.8% of LGBTAQ, 93.2% of HAABG) and respectful (73.1% of LGBTAQ, 82.4% of HAABG). In relation to improvements across campus, respondents expressed disappointment that only two gender options are offered on many University surveys and forms. Respondents also suggested that having more staff LGBTAQ role models and additional support and education for students in residential halls. The majority of all respondents reported they would feel comfortable using gender neutral bathrooms (78.7% of LGBTAQ, 64.6% of HAABG). In relation to support services, around three quarters of respondents agreed that there are visible resources on queer* issues and concerns at the University of Otago and two-thirds of respondents agreed that the OUSA Queer* Support service is inclusive, safe, and supportive. Conclusions & recommendations: The majority of students perceived the University of Otago campus to be friendly, respectful, and communicative, although perceptions were less positive among LGBTAQ students, who were also more likely to fear for their safety. LGBTAQ students were more likely to think there are not enough visible resources about queer* issues on campus but had more favourable perceptions of the OUSA Queer* Support service compared to HAABG students. Female LGBTAQ students were more likely to say they would access the OUSA Queer* Support service. This finding suggests that it may be beneficial to promote OUSA Queer* Support services specifically for students who are male or a non-binary gender. Students who are gay/lesbian/takatāpui and/or have non-binary gender identities were more likely to experience discrimination, fear for their safety, conceal their identities to avoid harassment, and had a less favourable perception of campus responses to harassment. Students with non-binary gender identities were more likely to have been denied opportunities, experienced threats of violence and threats to expose their identity, to have been harassed in a campus office, and had were less likely to have favourable views of campus in terms of friendliness, respectfulness, and communication. The OUSA Queer* Support service aims to provide an inclusive, visible, and responsive service and is using information from this survey in its work with LGBTAQ students and University staff to address harassment and other core issues such as availability of gender-neutral bathrooms. Future campus climate surveys will provide important monitoring of levels of discrimination and the success of efforts to support LGBTAQ students. The two key findings of this survey are that harassment is experienced by one in four LGBTAQ students at the University of Otago within a year, and HAABG students appear to underestimate the likelihood of this harassment. Discrimination and harassment leads around half of LGBTAQ students to conceal their sexual orientation and/or gender identity, with a third avoiding disclosing their sexual orientation and/or gender identity specifically to University staff to avoid negative consequences. Derogatory remarks in public on campus are the most common form of harassment reported by LGBTAQ students and female HAABG students, particularly in the evening, although harassment outside campus was also highlighted. Respondents also reported witnessing harassment but being fearful to intervene. These findings suggest LGBTAQ and HAABG students may benefit from workshops about skills to apply when witnessing or experiencing derogatory remarks or other forms of harassment. Additional advertising of the OUSA Queer* Support service is recommended via posters, social media, and in course resources. Wider efforts are also required to challenge the culture of discrimination towards LGBTAQ people through events to raise awareness throughout the year and in relevant venues, including residential halls.

    View record details
  • Religious Worlds of the Laity in Late Antique Gaul

    Bailey, Lisa (2016-04-07)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Christianity in the late antique world was not imposed but embraced, and the laity were not passive members of their religion but had a central role in its creation. This volume explores the role of the laity in Gaul, bringing together the fields of history, archaeology and theology. First, this book follows the ways in which clergy and monks tried to shape and manufacture lay religious experience. They had themselves constructed the category of 'the laity', which served as a negative counterpart to their self-definition. Lay religious experience was thus shaped in part by this need to create difference between categories. The book then focuses on how the laity experienced their religion, how they interpreted it and how their decisions shaped the nature of the Church and of their faith. This part of the study pays careful attention to the diversity of the laity in this period, their religious environments, ritual engagement, behaviours, knowledge and beliefs.The first volume to examine laity in this period in Gaul – a key region for thinking about the transition from Roman rule to post-Roman society – The Religious Worlds of the Laity in Late Antique Gaul fills an important gap in current literature.

    View record details
  • Chronic illness: the temporal thief

    Jowsey, Tanisha (2016-06-29)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Chronic illness is experienced in and through time. As the term ‘chronic’ suggests, the chronically ill body is one that reorients itself to the ways in which time is perceived, experienced and used, in a multiply of ways. New practices are developed and routines are established to manage chronic illness in personal and social contexts. As rhythms of bodily life change one’s expectations for the future might change, and their relations with other people (who have their own temporal rhythms) might also change. Meanings attributed to past and present experiences and practices, as well as future plans and imaginings, acquire new significance with chronic illness. For many people, chronic illness is experienced as a thief, stealing their imagined futures. Through public health and anthropological lenses this book investigates intersections between chronic illness and time.

    View record details
  • A short grammar of Urama

    Brown, Jason; Muir, A; Craig, K; Anea, K (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Urama (ISO: 639-3 kiw) is a language spoken primarily on Urama Island in Papua New Guinea. It is spoken in the Gulf Province, in the vicinity of Deception Bay, in the Era River Delta. Urama is part of the Kiwai language family, which is distributed along the south coast of Papua New Guinea. The Kiwai family in turn belongs to the larger Trans New Guinea stock.1 Within the Kiwai family, Urama belongs to the North-Eastern group, along with Arigibi, Gibaio, and Kope (also referred to as Gope) (Wurm 1973). The name ‘Urama’ is used to refer to the language, the ethnic group, and the island. A native Urama individual is termed Urama mere ‘Urama person’. Urama Island is in the Kikori district. Preliminary numbers for the 2011 census indicate the entire district has a population of 41,232. Official numbers of inhabitants on Urama Island are more difficult to obtain; however, Wurm (1971:139) has estimated the population of Urama speakers at around 1500. Foley (1986:233) estimated the population of North-Eastern Kiwai (presumably including Gibaio, Kope, and Urama, but not Arigibi, which Wurm & Hattori 1981 classify as a separate language²) at 3700 speakers, as has Wurm & Hattori (1981), and according to Ethnologue (Lewis et al. 2014, based on Foley’s 2011 estimates), there are 6000 speakers of North-East Kiwai (which includes Gibaio and Urama-Kope3 together). The adjacent areas speak various Kiwaian languages, and there is some mutual intelligibility between them. As Tok Pisin is one of the lingue franche of Papua New Guinea and is an official language, it is often the language of communication between those from other areas.

    View record details
  • Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry

    (2016-07-30)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry captures our individual and collective quests to deepen our understanding of the complex practices of teaching about teaching. Self-study methodology has transcended political and cultural boundaries to enhance understanding of “other”, crossed table and coffee conversations to deepen appreciation within institutions, supported teachers transitioning from classrooms to university, sustained mid-career academics to achieve new appreciation for the complexity of their roles, and enthused experienced academics to reflect on their expertise and question anew what it is to be a self-studying professional. In this edited collection, the Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices (S-STEP) community share how they have explored and probed their own understanding of how they might better teach student teachers to teach. The chapters are loosely grouped around the themes of enactment, discovery, inclusivity, and application. Enacting self-study as methodology for professional inquiry is a text written by international scholars to enhance the conversations and understandings associated with this methodology and to support the 11th International Conference on Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices held at Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England in July-August 2016.

    View record details
  • Gender Research in the Pacific 1994-2014: Beginnings

    Underhill-Sem, Yvonne (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Can We Believe It? Evidence for Christianity

    Seber, George (2016-03-21)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Many people today believe that Christianity will not stand up to a scientific or intellectual investigation, and that science has all the answers. Such an attitude shows an ignorance of the wealth of available philosophical arguments and scientific information that Dr. Seber taps into in this book. Initially, he shows that mathematics and science are limited in what they can prove in spite of modern advances. He then summarizes his material using basic questions as ten chapter headings: Does God exist, is there a spiritual dimension, do we have free will, is the Bible reliable, who is Jesus, do miracles occur, why does God allow suffering and evil, is Christianity a blessing or a curse to society, what about evolution, and how can we get to know God? The reader may have other questions and a number are considered within each chapter, such as problems with philosophical materialism and atheism. He draws his material from many sources including statistics, physics, cosmology, genetics, philosophy, history, biochemistry, theology, psychology, archaeology, and biology. Comparatively, new subjects like epigenetics, chaos theory, and quantum mechanics, that many people are not aware of, are brought into the picture. These topics change our thinking about reality.

    View record details
  • Women, dance and revolution: Performance and protest in the Southern Mediterranean

    Martin, Rosemary (2016-01-30)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The countries of the southern and eastern Mediterranean Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria have undergone major turmoil in recent years, with civil war, occupation and uprising. Women, Dance and Revolution offers a highly original perspective on the political and cultural tensions through the experiences of contemporary dance practitioners from the region. It shows how these women all established performers, choreographers and teachers have responded to the changes brought about by the troubles. Through dance they engage in public protest and performance, endure violence and repression, and reveal new meanings of identity, gender and body politics. Their journeys of dance illuminate how, despite moments of disillusionment, objection and betrayal, being a woman and being a dancer can still mean many things and influence society in many ways in the Arab World."

    View record details
  • Estimation methods and techniques in digital communication systems

    Berber, Stevan (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book presents methods and techniques for parameter (primarily the probability of error) and distribution function (primarily the error gap complementary distribution function) estimation using the error sequences obtained by measurement or simulation in elementary or cascaded channels. Theoretical analysis and testing confirm that it is possible to control the accuracy and reliability of estimation.

    View record details
  • Empowering Electricity: Co-operatives, Sustainability and Power Sector Reform in Canada

    MacArthur, Julie (2016-06-10)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Since the 1990s, there has been an upsurge in renewable electricity co-operatives across Canada as hundreds of community organizations have turned to the sun, wind, and even rivers as sources of local power generation. Empowering Electricity offers an illuminating analysis of these co-operatives within the context of larger debates over climate change, renewable electricity policy, sustainable community development, and provincial power-sector ownership. It looks at the conditions that led to this new wave of co-operative development, examines their form and location, and shines a light on the promises and challenges accompanying their development.

    View record details
  • Recent Advances in Experimental Studies of Social Dilemma Games

    (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The articles in this volume collectively represent the latest advances in how people think of social dilemma problems, how we may be able to enhance cooperation and reduce free-riding in such problems and how we can extend the lessons learned to a host of other similar issues facing us. We have learned, for instance, that a "take" frame does not necessarily lead to lower cooperation compared to a "give" frame but combining a "take" frame with fine-grained individual level feedback leads to more extreme behavior in terms of both greater cooperation and greater free-riding. We have also learned that a strategy based on payoff sampling may provide a more parsimonious and less parameter dependent way of modelling behavior in common pool resource extraction games. We find that people behave differently in social dilemmas when making decisions of their own as opposed to deciding on behalf of someone else.

    View record details
  • Intersecting Cultures in Music and Dance Education: An Oceanic Perspective

    (2016-05-25)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    This volume looks forward and re-examines present day education and pedagogical practices in music and dance in the diverse cultural environments found in Oceania.

    View record details
  • Customer Engagement: Contemporary Issues and Challenges

    (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    How customers and consumer behavior have been changing due to technology and other forces is of prime interest. This book addresses the central questions regarding new emerging consumer behavior; how does social media affect this behavior; how and at what points do emotions affect consumer decisions; and what triggers this is: How should engagement be conceptualized, defined and measured? How do social media and other marketing activities create engagement? The book draws on the rich, extensive knowledge of the authors who are pioneers in the field. The book's editors have identified the weakness in the current knowledge and aim to address this gap by touching on significant conceptual and empirical contributions to this emerging literature stream, providing readers with a comprehensive contemporary perspective of customer engagement. The book also endeavors to develop a richer narrative around the notion of social media and customer engagement, and the non-monetary notion of social media within new media-based social networks.

    View record details
  • Post-admission Language Assessment of University Students

    (2016-08-10)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    English-medium universities around the world face real challenges in ensuring that incoming students have the language and literacy skills they need to cope with the demands of their degree programmes. One response has been a variety of institutional initiatives to assess students after admission, in order to identify those with significant needs and advise them on how to enhance their academic language ability. This volume brings together papers from Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Oman, South Africa and the United States, written by language assessment specialists who discuss issues in the design and implementation of these post-admission assessments in their own institutions. A major theme running through the book is the need to evaluate the validity of such assessments not just on their technical quality but on their impact, in terms of giving students access to effective means of developing their language skills and ultimately enhancing their academic achievement.

    View record details
  • Talking Dance: Contemporary Histories from the South China Sea

    Rowe, Nicholas; Buck, Ralph; Shapiro-Phim, T (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    The South China Sea has a rich and turbulent history. Today territorial disputes in the region including China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Philippines and Indonesia make it potentially one of the most dangerous points of conflict in Asia and millions of people have crossed its waters in search of safer shores. This new book reveals the ways in which the peoples of the South China Sea region have used dance as a means of contending with the immense political, economic and cultural rifts that have affected their lives. Drawing on the stories of indigenous dancers in southern China, the Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, it offers unique insights into the ways in which people have used creative movement as a means of understanding the divisions and alienation that conflict, diaspora and globalization have brought and as a first step towards reclaiming their identities and their worlds.

    View record details
  • Responsible Leadership: Realism and Romanticism

    (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    It is time for the development of a new kind of business leadership. Global needs call for a revision of market capitalism and a move towards moral capitalism; a move "from value to values, from shareholders to stakeholders, and from balance sheets to balanced development" (Kofi Annan). With the challenge of this transition in mind, this book argues that it is time for a new understanding of leadership, a new romanticism which looks behind the overvalued, heroic leadership notion. The editors explore a romanticized rhetoric and situate it within current discourses of authentic, distributed and ethical leadership, where societal, economic and environmental challenges require us to take a collective lead towards doing good and growing well. Exploring this dichotomy of romantic ideal and essential requirement, this book combines the insights of leading academics and with those of practitioners in the field. Thought-provoking and engaging it will challenge both thinking and practice, and is essential reading for all those operating or researching in the field of leadership, particularly those who realize the overwhelming challenges of sustainability, and corporate social responsibility which the world now faces.

    View record details
  • New Zealand United States Relations

    Hoadley, John (2016)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    An analysis of how New Zealand leaders managed 45 differences and disputes with the United States in security, diplomacy, and trade.

    View record details