1,831 results for Book

  • Thyme in Central Otago : a summary of studies by biology students at Dunstan High School, Alexandra

    Wilkinson, E. L.; Dann, G. M.; Smith, G. J. S.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Thymus vulgarais L. (Labiatae) is a plant which has become an increasingly prominent member of the adventive flora of Central Otago since its introduction into the area last century. Its distribution is confined to the valleys of the Clutha, Kawarau and Mauherikia Rivers. Seed dispersal methods were investigated, with the role of animals, wind and mechanical methods being considered. From the studies so far, it would seem that the latter two are the most important methods of dispersal open to the plant. Germination studies revealed that acidity, cold treatment of seed prior to planting, and the exposure of seed to light on sowing, enhanced the germination rate. The effects of thyme oil on germination was also tested. Thyme appears to prefer a well-drained soil, and a relatively sheltered, well-lit, warm situation. The success of the plant in arid areas may be attributable to the reduction in competition from grasses and other herbs. Thyme can be controlled either mechanically or chemically; its future in Central Otago, though, may lie in its use as a source of honey, its harvest as a culinary herb, and its value as an object of study.

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  • Proceedings of the 1979 Hill and High Country Seminar, Lincoln College, 2-4 July 1979

    Robertson, B. T.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The proceedings of the 1979 Hill and High Country Seminar includes the full text of the following papers: Rent - I. G. C. Kerr, Rentals for pastoral leases; R. Frizzell, Some problems; New Horizons - G. A. Joll, Opportunities for commercial recreation; J. G. Newson, New livestock opportunities; P. J. Morrissey, Commentary; A. H. Nordmeyer, A major forestry option; Dr. W. A. N. Brown, Commentary; Managing the Hills - Dr. J.A. Hayward, Understanding the hills; M. Douglass, Regional resource planning – the process of selecting objectives; Problem-solving research- Dr. D. Scott, Pastures; Dr. A. J. Allison, Animals; Dr. J. G. H. White, Crops; J. S. Dunn, Machines; J. R. Cocks, Commentary; Profitability - N. W. Taylor, G. T. Mars, Economics of hill and high country production; I. G. C. Kerr, Production and performance in the high country; A. R. Sykes, Achieving better stock performance; K. F. O’Connor, A forward look.

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  • The Snow of August 1973

    Hughes, J. G.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Reprinted 1979.

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  • Electric fencing

    Weston, L. H.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    First edition published 1964.

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  • A review of rentals for pastoral leases

    Kerr, I. G. C.; Frizzell, Ralph; Ross, B. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    2nd ed. reprinted in 1980.

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  • Proceedings of the 1981 Hill and High Country Seminar, Lincoln College, 9-10 July, 1981

    Robertson, B. T.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The proceedings of the 1981 Hill and High Country Seminar includes the full text of the following papers: Methods to treat and Control Footrot – A. S. Familton, Can We Eradicate Footrot? – A. D. Ross, Crops for Cold Climates – R. N. Rowe, Climate Data for Agriculture - R.W. Heine, Where are we with Rabbit Control? J. Bell and J.M. Williams

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  • Lincoln College theses and dissertations deposited in the library

    Scott, Anne-Maree

    Book
    Lincoln University

    A bibliography of theses and dissertations completed at Lincoln College (and/or University of New Zealand, Lincoln) and deposited in the university library between 1928-1988.

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  • China on Video: Smaller Screen Realities

    Voci, Paola (2010)

    Book
    University of Otago

    China On Video is the first in-depth study that examines smaller-screen realities and the important role they play not only in the fast-changing Chinese mediascape, but also more broadly in the practice of experimental and non-mainstream cinema. At the crossroads of several disciplines—film, media, new media, media anthropology, visual arts, contemporary China area studies, and cultural studies--this book reveals the existence of a creative, humorous, but also socially and politically critical "China on video", which locates itself outside of the intellectual discourse surrounding both auteur cinema and digital art.

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  • The feasibility of compost manufacture in metropolitan Christchurch

    Mulcock, A. P.; Johnson, R. W. M.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report has been prepared by a committee of citizens of Greater Christchurch who are concerned with the human environment. The committee feels that a considerable improvement in the quality of this environment could be achieved now and in the future, by introducing new methods of refuse disposal.

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  • Recreation in the Waimakariri Basin; an introductory study with special reference to the Broken River region

    Hayward, John A.; Boffa, Frank D.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Published for the Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute by the Lincoln College Press with financial assistance from the New Zealand Environmental Council.

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  • Beef cattle on tussock country

    Hughes, J. G.; McClatchy, D.; Hayward, John A.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Published for the Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute by Lincoln College Press.

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  • Health Professionals and Trust: The Cure for Healthcare Law and Policy

    Henaghan, Mark (2012)

    Book
    University of Otago

    An ever increasing number of codes of conduct, disciplinary bodies, ethics committees and bureaucratic policies now prescribe how health professionals and health researchers relate to their patients. In this book, Mark Henaghan argues that the result of this trend towards heightened regulation has been to diminish reliance upon their professional judgment, whilst simultaneously failing to trust patients to make decisions about their own care. This book examines the issue of health professionals and trust comparatively in a number of countries including the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK. The book draws upon historical analysis of legislation, case law, disciplinary proceedings reports, articles in medical and law journals and protocols produced by management teams in hospitals, to illustrate the ways in which there has been a discernible shift away from trust in healthcare professionals. Henaghan argues that this erosion of trust has the potential to dehumanise the unique relationship that has traditionally existed between healthcare professionals and their patients, thereby running the risk of turning healthcare into a mechanistic enterprise controlled by ‘management processes’ rather than a humanistic relationship governed by trust and judgment. This book is an invaluable resource for students and scholars of medical law and medical sociology, public policy-makers and a range of associated professionals, from health-service managers to medical science and clinical researchers.

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  • Maximizing fine wool income

    Cottle, David J.; Jopp, Robert

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Adapted from papers delivered to the 1987 Hill and High Country Seminar, Lincoln College. Published with assistance from the New Zealand Wool Board.

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  • The public mountain land resource for recreation in New Zealand

    Davison, Jenny; Geden, Bruce; Smith, Jaquetta

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The first volume of these studies concentrated on the needs, behaviour and wants of New Zealand mountain recreationists. It was the conception of Dr Robert Aukerman of Colorado State University in his leadership of this mountain recreation research programme at Lincoln College that an inventory and analysis of public mountain land resources for recreation should be an integral part of the programme. Bruce Geden and Jenny Davison had begun such work as part of their post-graduate Diploma in Natural Resources projects at Lincoln College. Under Bob Aukerman's guidance, first Bruce Geden then Jaquetta Smith developed and unified the inventory to include all pub public land areas "perceived as mountains" throughout the main islands of New Zealand. Jaquetta Smith and Jenny Davison patiently canvassed the agencies administering such lands, identifying from a variety of sources the records of natural resources and recreation facilities for each administrative region. The variety of talents that each brought to the study, Jaquetta Smith with degrees in geology and forestry, Jenny Davison in history, Bruce Geden in geography, were unified in their common interest in natural resources and recreation. Their combined work is presented in a format which takes account of both public administration and regional geography. This inventory is of mountain land which is conventionally considered as public land. Omitted from it are the extensive areas of mountain lands which are included in the pastorally-occupied areas of both North and South Island. The recreational use of South Island pastoral runs is the subject of studies reported in the third volume of this series. Recreational use of North Island pastoral properties may be principally as access to public mountain land resources beyond their boundaries. Such questions of access are briefly mentioned at appropriate points in this inventory. Also omitted from this inventory are most of those areas of mountain lands which remain as Maori Land. It would be presumptuous of this Institute to report on such terrain without the active cooperation of Maori people. The recreational significance of such Maori Land to both Maori and other people warrants a full exposition in its own right. This volume will be welcomed as the first compendium of public recreational land resources on a national basis. What is presented here may stimulate other appropriate agencies to compile similar inventories of recreational resources of New Zealand coasts and wetlands and to expand the recreational assessment of New Zealand water bodies. Only by such documentation are the issues of access and management likely to be clarified. The interests of both New Zealand residents and visitors from overseas demand that these issues receive the purposeful and sustained attention of citizens and administrative agencies alike. It is the hope of this Institute that these three volumes of studies will help make this possible.

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  • Campus climate for students with diverse sexual orientations and/or gender identities at the University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand

    Treharne, Gareth; Beres, Melanie; Nicolson, Max; Richardson, Aimee; Ruzibiza, Christian; Graham, Katie; Briggs, Hahna; Ballantyne, Neill (2016)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Background & aims: Despite increasingly positive attitudes towards diversity in sexual orientation and gender identity, university students who identify as lesbian/gay/takatāpui, bisexual/pansexual, trans, asexual, questioning, and/or queer* (LGBTAQ) continue to experience harassment and discrimination on campus to a great extent than students who identify as heterosexual and a binary gender (HAABG). Previous studies, predominantly conducted in the United States, have reported that LGBTAQ students experience harassment, threats, and even physical assault on campus, most commonly from other students. Because of this harassment, it is not surprising that some LGBTAQ students do not disclose their identity on campus for fear of negative consequences. Studies also suggest that support services can act to reduce the occurrence, and the impact, of harassment and discrimination. The main aim of this project was to survey the campus experiences of students attending the University of Otago and to compare the views and experiences of LGBTAQ students and HAABG students in terms of: forms of harassment and discrimination they have faced; fear for safety; concealment of sexual orientation and/or gender identity; views on which groups of people within the LGBTAQ umbrella they perceive as facing harassment on campus; views on organisational responses to LGBTAQ issues; views of the OUSA Queer* Support service; and views on the overall campus climate including climate within classes. Methods & sample: Students registered at the University of Otago were sent an email containing a link to the online survey in April 2014. A total of 1,234 respondents fully completed the survey and were included in the final analysis. Within the total sample, 66.5% of respondents identified as female, 32.5% identified as male, and 1.1% identified as ‘other’ (including trans, genderqueer, and agender individuals). Over two-thirds of respondents identified as HAABG (n = 878, 71.2%), whereas over a quarter (n = 356, 28.8%) identified as LGBAQ and/or reported their gender identity as ‘other’. The survey contained 41 fixed-response questions enquiring about demographics, ‘outness’, experiences of discrimination and harassment, views on likelihood of harassment for groups within the LGBTAQ community, campus responses and support service, and overall campus climate. Comments on respondents’ experiences and the survey itself were requested in two questions at the end of the survey. Results: There were significant difference between LGBTAQ and HAABG respondents on many of the questions. Over a fifth of LGBTAQ respondents reported being out to friends and family (21.4%) and around one in 10 (11.3%) were not out to anyone, compared to the majority of HAABG respondents (87.2%) reporting they were out to all people. Half of LGBTAQ respondents (50.3%) reported they had concealed their sexual orientation/gender identity to avoid intimidation and 31.6% reported they had also avoided disclosing their sexual orientation/gender identity to University staff due to fear of negative outcomes. Most respondents reported they had not been denied opportunities due to their sexual orientation/gender identity (95.9% for LGBTAQ and 98.1% for HAABG) but over 10% of the LGBTAQ respondents reported having felt fearful for their physical safety due to their sexual orientation/gender identity compared to 3.7% of HAABG respondents. A quarter of the LGBTAQ respondents reported experiencing harassment as a result of their sexual orientation/gender identity compared to 5.8% of HAABG respondents. Over 20% of LGBTAQ respondents reported being subjected to derogatory remarks compared to 4.1% of HAABG respondents. Nearly one in six LGBTAQ respondents had received direct or indirect threats (compared to 2.2% of HAABG respondents), and 1.7% had been assaulted (compared to 0.2% of HAABG respondents). LGBTAQ respondents reported that harassment was most likely to occur in a public space on campus (12.6%), while walking on campus (11.2%), or in a hall of residence (8.1%). The most common source of harassment was other students for both LGBTAQ respondents (21.9%) and HAABG respondents (3.3%). The majority of all respondents agreed that the campus is friendly (89.8% of LGBTAQ, 93.2% of HAABG) and respectful (73.1% of LGBTAQ, 82.4% of HAABG). In relation to improvements across campus, respondents expressed disappointment that only two gender options are offered on many University surveys and forms. Respondents also suggested that having more staff LGBTAQ role models and additional support and education for students in residential halls. The majority of all respondents reported they would feel comfortable using gender neutral bathrooms (78.7% of LGBTAQ, 64.6% of HAABG). In relation to support services, around three quarters of respondents agreed that there are visible resources on queer* issues and concerns at the University of Otago and two-thirds of respondents agreed that the OUSA Queer* Support service is inclusive, safe, and supportive. Conclusions & recommendations: The majority of students perceived the University of Otago campus to be friendly, respectful, and communicative, although perceptions were less positive among LGBTAQ students, who were also more likely to fear for their safety. LGBTAQ students were more likely to think there are not enough visible resources about queer* issues on campus but had more favourable perceptions of the OUSA Queer* Support service compared to HAABG students. Female LGBTAQ students were more likely to say they would access the OUSA Queer* Support service. This finding suggests that it may be beneficial to promote OUSA Queer* Support services specifically for students who are male or a non-binary gender. Students who are gay/lesbian/takatāpui and/or have non-binary gender identities were more likely to experience discrimination, fear for their safety, conceal their identities to avoid harassment, and had a less favourable perception of campus responses to harassment. Students with non-binary gender identities were more likely to have been denied opportunities, experienced threats of violence and threats to expose their identity, to have been harassed in a campus office, and had were less likely to have favourable views of campus in terms of friendliness, respectfulness, and communication. The OUSA Queer* Support service aims to provide an inclusive, visible, and responsive service and is using information from this survey in its work with LGBTAQ students and University staff to address harassment and other core issues such as availability of gender-neutral bathrooms. Future campus climate surveys will provide important monitoring of levels of discrimination and the success of efforts to support LGBTAQ students. The two key findings of this survey are that harassment is experienced by one in four LGBTAQ students at the University of Otago within a year, and HAABG students appear to underestimate the likelihood of this harassment. Discrimination and harassment leads around half of LGBTAQ students to conceal their sexual orientation and/or gender identity, with a third avoiding disclosing their sexual orientation and/or gender identity specifically to University staff to avoid negative consequences. Derogatory remarks in public on campus are the most common form of harassment reported by LGBTAQ students and female HAABG students, particularly in the evening, although harassment outside campus was also highlighted. Respondents also reported witnessing harassment but being fearful to intervene. These findings suggest LGBTAQ and HAABG students may benefit from workshops about skills to apply when witnessing or experiencing derogatory remarks or other forms of harassment. Additional advertising of the OUSA Queer* Support service is recommended via posters, social media, and in course resources. Wider efforts are also required to challenge the culture of discrimination towards LGBTAQ people through events to raise awareness throughout the year and in relevant venues, including residential halls.

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  • Mavora : development of a planning process for reconciliation of interests in wilderness

    O'Connor, K. F.; Batchelor, G. W.; Davison, J. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Published by Centre for Resource Management for Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute Lincoln College, New Zealand, September 1982.

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  • The Resources of Lake Wanaka

    Robertson, B. T.; Blair, I. D.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    Published for the Guardians of Lake Wanaka by Tussock Grasslands & Mountain Lands Institute, Lincoln College.

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  • Mangarevan Archaeology: Interpretations using new data and 40 year old excavations to establish a sequence from 1200 to 1900 AD

    Green, Roger C.; Weisler, Marshall I. (2000-11)

    Book
    University of Otago

    An unpublished archaeological sequence supported by information from six sites excavated in the Mangarevan group in 1959 is presented in the context of additional data and current interpretations of the prehistory of southeastern Polynesia. The sequence covers the period from ca. 1200 ad to the time of early 19th century contact with Europeans, with its dating enhanced by four new radiocarbon age determinations plus four previous ones, all on samples collected in 1959. More recent information from archaeological investigations on nearby Pitcairn and Henderson islands, showing they formed part of a long-term interaction sphere with Mangareva, indicate that while the early part of the Mangareva sequence from ca. 800 to 1200 ad remains unexplored through excava- tion, buried deposits for this interval probably exist within Rikitea village on the main island of the group. An 800 ad settlement for Mangareva is consistent with a similar age and origin for the first inhabitants of Easter Island, as aspects of the 13th century assemblages from both places still remain quite comparable in style and function.

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  • Su’ena: Five Hundred Years of Interaction in the Eastern Triangle, Solomon Islands

    Walter, Richard; Green, Roger C. (2011)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Pacific Archaeology: Documenting the Past 50,000 Years

    (2013)

    Book
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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