8 results for Book item, 1980

  • Appraisal of the Commercial Potential of the New Zealand Deepwater Fishery

    Putterill, Martin (1981)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The waters surrounding New Zealand contain some of the few remaining underdeveloped fish stocks. As a result of 200 mile Economic Zone legislation a relatively small country has assumed management responsibility for a significant fishery. Results from scientific and commercial fishing activity though helping to clarify the probable abundance of fish, has done little to inform all concerned whether or not the EEZ declaration was a commercial bonanza. Apart from this, there are a number of practical decisions to be made by public sector fishery managers which affect their commercial counterparts, but to a degree that neither party can determine. In an attempt to resolve some of these problems, a computer model (DEFCAM) has been developed. Consisting of 3 parts, resources, marketing and financial, DEFCAM enables investors and managers to pretest the outcome of higher levels of investment and other problems of a practical nature. The model maintains links between each subsystem revealing important consequences such as the adverse impact in the form of lower catches for all as a result of increase in effort. The paper describes the simulation of a series of different situations. Although absolute results are not given, there are clear indications of the factors to which final operating results are most sensitive. In addition to these uses, the paper briefly considers the extent to which DEFCAM may also become useful in any partly developed fishery as an early warning system against overfishing.

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  • Common Law, Statute and Equity

    Cassidy, Julie; Kelly, P (1988)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Common Law, Statute and Equity

    Cassidy, Julie; Kelly, P (1989)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Appendix B: Some morphometric parameters of named lakes with areas [greater than or equal to] 1.0 km2, and some smaller lakes, in New Zealand

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1987-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Gaps indicate uncertainty or that accurate data are unavailable. Note that lakes with fluctuating levels e.g., those used for hydro-electric purposes, or near coasts have varying parameters. Table based mainly on Irwin (1975) with some data from Cunningham et al. (1953), Irwin (1972), Jolly & Brown (1975), Irwin & Pickrill (1983), Howard-Williams & Vincent 1984, Boswell et al. (1985), Livingstone et al. (1986), N.Z.O.I. Lake Chart series, N.Z. Topographical Map Series NZMS1 (1:63 360) and NZMS26O (1:50 000), and other sources.

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  • Appendix A: Maps showing the distributions of lakes in New Zealand and their grouping into distinct districts reflecting the predominance of particular geological processes

    Green, John D.; Lowe, David J. (1987-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The large-scale maps of each of the lake districts show lakes with a maximum dimension ≥ c0.5 km.

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  • Origins and development of the lakes

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1987)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Because of a turbulent and complex recent geological history, New Zealand has an impressively diverse and dynamic landscape, and a correspondingly wide array of lake types, within a small land area (Irwin 1975a; Soons & Selby 1982;). The development of such an active geological environment in New Zealand has been governed largely by its location athwart the Australian and Pacific plate boundary, and its maritime mid-latitude position has made it particularly sensitive to the climatic fluctations and associated glaciations and sea level changes of the Quaternary Period (Suggate et al. 1978). At present, the rates of uplift and erosion of mountainous areas are among the fastest in the world. Earthquakes are common, and volcanism has characterised much of the North Island during the Quaternary with numerous volcanoes active in the last few thousand years. Large, explosive caldera volcanoes in central North Island have erupted repeatedly over the last million years, producing voluminous amounts of lava and widespread pyroclastic deposits. The landforms, soils and lakes are thus typically youthful, almost all being younger than two million years; indeed, much of the landscape is of late Pleistocene and Holocene age, and is still actively developing (Pillans et al. 1982). Our purpose in this chapter is to outline the relationship between these often violent and spectacular geological processes which have led to the formation and development of the various lake types in New Zealand. Against this background we describe the classification and distribution of the main lake types, their ages and mechanisms of formation. We also comment on lake sedimentation patterns, palaeolimnological studies, and on features of lake bathymetry and morphology.

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  • The effect of climate on lake mixing patterns and temperatures

    Green, John D.; Viner, A.B.; Lowe, David J. (1987)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The maritime geographical location has been said to give distinctive characteristics of water mixing to lakes (Hutchinson 1957, pp. 443-444), but such effects have never been described in detail. New Zealand's lakes should exemplify well these maritime distinctions, and in this chapter features of water column mixing and temperature changes are identified which can distinguish New Zealand lakes from those elsewhere.

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  • Parent materials of Yellow-brown loams in the Waikato-Coromandel district.

    Gibbs, H.S.; Lowe, David J.; Hogg, Alan G. (1982-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The yellow-brown loams of the Waikato-Coromandel region are derived from weathered airfall volcanic materials. These materials may be either direct airfall deposits, or erosion products of these deposits, described as reworked ash in some publications. In the erosion products small amounts of other rocks may be included in the parent materials, and these additions may modify to a slight degree the chemical and physical properties of the soil as a yellow-brown loam. In larger amounts these additions result in the formation of intergrades to yellow-brown earths or gley soils.

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