8 results for Book item, 1990, 1997

  • The contructivist paradigm and some implications for science content and pedagogy

    Carr, Malcolm; Barker, Miles; Bell, Beverley; Biddulph, Fred; Jones, Alister; Kirkwood, Valda; Pearson, John; Symington, David (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Through a comparison of the widely-held traditional view of science with the constructivist view of science, we argue that the constructivist view of the content of science has important implications for classroom teaching and learning. This alternative view of science concepts as human constructs, scrutinised by application of the rules of the game of science, raises many challenges for teachers. Reconceptualisation of teachers' views of the nature of science and of learning in science is important for a constructivist pedagogy. We argue here that open discussion of the 'rules of the game' of science would contribute to better learning in the classroom, since learners would be better equipped to change their existing concepts by knowing more about the nature of science itself.

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  • 'Welcome to the Block': Priglashenie na kazn/ Invitation to a Beheading: A Documentary Record

    Boyd, Brian (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Contra the Hypothetical Persona in Music

    Davies, Stephen (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Technology and science education

    Jones, Alister; Compton, Vicki (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The incorporation of technology into the school curriculum is part of a worldwide trend in education. The way in which technology is incorporated depends on which country the reform is initiated in. The New Zealand Curriculum Framework (Ministry of Education, 1993a) includes science and technology as distinct learning areas. This chapter considers the view of technology expressed in both science in the New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1993b) and in Technology in the New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1995). The chapter is divided into four sections. Firstly, the concept of technology in the science curriculum is identified and discussed; secondly, the use of some types of technological application to enhance the learning of science outcomes is considered; thirdly, the technology curriculum itself is discussed in order to highlight the concept of technology underpinning this statement so that comparisons can be made with the concept employed in the science curriculum, and finally the introduction of technology outcomes by science teachers in a science environment is explored.

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  • Electronics and control technology

    Forret, Michael (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Until recently, there was no requirement to learn electronics and control technology in the New Zealand school curriculum. Apart from isolated pockets of teaching based on the enthusiasm of individual teachers, there is very little direct learning of electronics in New Zealand primary or secondary schools. The learning of electronics is located in tertiary vocational training programmes. Thus, few school students learn about electronics and few school teachers have experience in teaching it. Lack of experience with electronics (other than using its products) has contributed to a commonly held view of electronics as out of the control and intellectual grasp of the average person; the domain of the engineer, programmer and enthusiast with his or her special aptitude. This need not be true, but teachers' and parents' lack of experience with electronics is in danger of denying young learners access to the mainstream of modern technology.

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  • Technology education in the New Zealand curriculum

    Jones, Alister (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter, the way in which experience of existing school programmes influences teacher perceptions of technology education is discussed, and reasons for teaching technology are outlined. A relationship between technology and technology education is suggested and the structure of technology education in the New Zealand technology curriculum is described. A particular focus is the role of technological activities in technology education, and this is developed in the final section.

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  • Ta moko: Maori tattoo

    Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The author examines the history, technique and meaning of ta moko (Maori tattoo) from prehistory to modern times.

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  • Introduction (Art and Its Messages: Meaning, Morality, and Society)

    Davies, Stephen (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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