29 results for Book item, 1990

  • Electronics and control technology

    Forret, Michael (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Until recently, there was no requirement to learn electronics and control technology in the New Zealand school curriculum. Apart from isolated pockets of teaching based on the enthusiasm of individual teachers, there is very little direct learning of electronics in New Zealand primary or secondary schools. The learning of electronics is located in tertiary vocational training programmes. Thus, few school students learn about electronics and few school teachers have experience in teaching it. Lack of experience with electronics (other than using its products) has contributed to a commonly held view of electronics as out of the control and intellectual grasp of the average person; the domain of the engineer, programmer and enthusiast with his or her special aptitude. This need not be true, but teachers' and parents' lack of experience with electronics is in danger of denying young learners access to the mainstream of modern technology.

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  • Technology education in the New Zealand curriculum

    Jones, Alister (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter, the way in which experience of existing school programmes influences teacher perceptions of technology education is discussed, and reasons for teaching technology are outlined. A relationship between technology and technology education is suggested and the structure of technology education in the New Zealand technology curriculum is described. A particular focus is the role of technological activities in technology education, and this is developed in the final section.

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  • Towards an understanding of thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the formation of clay minerals from volcanic glass under various environmental conditions

    Hodder, A.P.W.; Naish, T.R.; Lowe, David J. (1996-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    lmogolite is the kinetically and thermodynamically favoured weathering product from rhyolitic volcanic glass in the soil-forming environment. However, on thermodynamic grounds imogolite would also appear to be the favoured alteration product of rhyolitic glass deposited in the nearshore marine environment. On the basis that the rate of conversion of glass to clay minerals is a function of the solubility of the clay mineral, smectite is expected to be formed under mildly diagenetic conditions, and formed more rapidly than imogolite in soil. The derived activation energies for formation of imogolite from glass in soils are appropriate for a diffusion controlled reaction, and appear consistent with the diffusion of the tetrahedrally co-ordinated species Al[iv](OH)₂(H2Q)⁺. In the marine environment, however the mechanism for all reactions appear to be surface reaction control.

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  • Lakes

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1992-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Lakes have always held an aesthetic fascination for people; they figure prominently in both art and literature and have even been endowed with spiritual qualities. For example, the nineteenth century American writer Henry D. Thoreau (1854) considered a lake to be 'the landscape's most beautiful and expressive feature. It is the earth's eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature'. More prosaically, lakes are also of considerable geomorphological interest as dynamic landfonns originating in varied and often complex ways.

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  • The middle Waikato Basin and hills

    Selby, Michael J.; Lowe, David J. (1992-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The middle Waikato (or Hamilton) Basin is a roughly oval-shaped depression more than 80 km north to south and more than 40 km wide. The basin, except in the south, is almost completely surrounded by ranges up to 300 m high, broken by only a few gaps. In the south the basin floor rises gradually and merges with the dissected plateaux of the King Country.

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  • Responses of salmonids to habitat changes

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Hall, James D.; Bisson, P. A.; Sedell, J. R. (1991)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Streams in western North America provide spawning and rearing habitats for several species of salmon and trout that are of substantial economic importance in the region. Timber that grows on lands through which these streams flow is also economically important, and its harvest can substantially change habitat conditions and aquatic production in salmonid streams. Undisturbed forests, the streams that flow through them, and the salmonid communities in these streams have intrinsic scientific, genetic, and cultural values in addition to their economic importance. The complex relations between salmonids and their physical environment, and the changes in these relations brought about by timber harvest, have been investigated extensively (see the bibliography by Macdonald et al. 1988). However, in spite of considerable evidence of profound changes in channel morphology and in light, temperature, and flow regimes associated with timber harvests, much uncertainty exists about the responses of salmonids to these changes.

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  • Ta moko: Maori tattoo

    Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The author examines the history, technique and meaning of ta moko (Maori tattoo) from prehistory to modern times.

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  • Introduction (Art and Its Messages: Meaning, Morality, and Society)

    Davies, Stephen (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • "Come, let me clutch thee": Macbeth and the Marvelous Text

    Bishop, Thomas (1999)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Examines the role of Biblical language and Biblically-derived notions of the sublime text in creating the peculiar atmosphere of Macbeth.

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