29 results for Book item, 1990

  • Contra the Hypothetical Persona in Music

    Davies, Stephen (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Is Architecture Art?

    Davies, Stephen (1994)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Why Listen to Sad Music if It Makes One Feel Sad?

    Davies, Stephen (1995)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Evaluation of Music

    Davies, Stephen (1994)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sovereigns, Sovereignty and the Treaty of Waitangi

    Davies, Stephen; Ewin, RE (1992)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • “We’re just New Zealanders”: The Politics of Pakeha Identity

    Bell, Shirley (1996)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Geological Information in New Zealand

    Leaming, Elva (1999)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand consists of two large is1ands--some 270,000 square kilometers in area--straddling a major crustal plate boundary. The present landscape is the highest part of a submerged subcontinent that broke away from Gondwana some 80 million years ago. To the northeast the Pacific oceanic plate is subducting westward, and to the southwest the Tasman seafloor is subducting eastward beneath the Campbell Plateau. These two subduction zones are linked through the transcurrent Alpine Fault. In the mid 19th Century two world-famous geologists contributed to the country's geological exploration. Hochstetter, from Austria, established a tradition of systematic geological mapping, and Hector, from Canada, founded the New Zealand Geological Survey. New Zealand's national geological organization, now the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS), continues to publish a broad spectrum of geological literature and maps. Its library holds the largest collection of geological literature pertaining to New Zealand. The six universities that teach geology and earth sciences each have library collections of a high standard. The University of Auckland Geology Collection is housed in the Science Library with an area that is a focal point for geological information and literature research.

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  • From assimilation to biculturalism: Changing patterns in Maori-Pakeha relationships

    Thomas, David R.; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1996)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter examines the changing patterns of inter-ethnic relationships among Maori and Pakeha in New Zealand, specifically the moves from assimilation towards biculturalism. The impact of recent debate about the Treaty of Waitangi is described and examples of bicultural policies and their consequences are outlined.

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  • The contructivist paradigm and some implications for science content and pedagogy

    Carr, Malcolm; Barker, Miles; Bell, Beverley; Biddulph, Fred; Jones, Alister; Kirkwood, Valda; Pearson, John; Symington, David (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Through a comparison of the widely-held traditional view of science with the constructivist view of science, we argue that the constructivist view of the content of science has important implications for classroom teaching and learning. This alternative view of science concepts as human constructs, scrutinised by application of the rules of the game of science, raises many challenges for teachers. Reconceptualisation of teachers' views of the nature of science and of learning in science is important for a constructivist pedagogy. We argue here that open discussion of the 'rules of the game' of science would contribute to better learning in the classroom, since learners would be better equipped to change their existing concepts by knowing more about the nature of science itself.

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  • Time and Timelessness in the Traditions of Early Greek Oral Poetry and Archaic Vase-Painting

    Mackay, Elizabeth (1996)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Two Youths from Boiotia

    Mackay, Elizabeth (1995)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Information literacy curriculum & assessment: Implications for schools from New Zealand.

    Brown, Gavin (1999)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The development of the ???information society??? or ???information age??? creates a global context for instruction in information skills. Ensuring that students have skills in handling, understanding, and producing information is increasingly considered a vital educational goal. This chapter reviews the literature on information literacy, focusing on the common elements and aspects of information skills sequences and components. The New Zealand curriculum, resource, and research scene relevant to information skills is reviewed and evaluated against international trends. Present trends and developments in the assessment and measurement of information skills are reviewed. Possible implications for the information literate school are examined.

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  • 'Welcome to the Block': Priglashenie na kazn/ Invitation to a Beheading: A Documentary Record

    Boyd, Brian (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Ada

    Boyd, Brian (1995)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Conservatism and constancy: New Zealand sexual culture in the era of AIDS

    Davis, PB; Lay Yee, Roy; Jacobson, O (1996)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Davies, Stephen (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Responses of salmonids to habitat changes

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Hall, James D.; Bisson, P. A.; Sedell, J. R. (1991)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Streams in western North America provide spawning and rearing habitats for several species of salmon and trout that are of substantial economic importance in the region. Timber that grows on lands through which these streams flow is also economically important, and its harvest can substantially change habitat conditions and aquatic production in salmonid streams. Undisturbed forests, the streams that flow through them, and the salmonid communities in these streams have intrinsic scientific, genetic, and cultural values in addition to their economic importance. The complex relations between salmonids and their physical environment, and the changes in these relations brought about by timber harvest, have been investigated extensively (see the bibliography by Macdonald et al. 1988). However, in spite of considerable evidence of profound changes in channel morphology and in light, temperature, and flow regimes associated with timber harvests, much uncertainty exists about the responses of salmonids to these changes.

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  • Workplace democracy and training reform: Some emerging insights from Australia and New Zealand

    Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (1999)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This paper builds on a series of published articles and chapters that date back to the ESREA seminar on Adult education and the labour market held in Slovenia in 1993 Law, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998a, 1998b. The overarching purpose of that work has been to track and analyse, from a labour studies perspective, trade union strategies to education and training reform in Australia and New Zealand since the mid-1980s.

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  • Electronics and control technology

    Forret, Michael (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Until recently, there was no requirement to learn electronics and control technology in the New Zealand school curriculum. Apart from isolated pockets of teaching based on the enthusiasm of individual teachers, there is very little direct learning of electronics in New Zealand primary or secondary schools. The learning of electronics is located in tertiary vocational training programmes. Thus, few school students learn about electronics and few school teachers have experience in teaching it. Lack of experience with electronics (other than using its products) has contributed to a commonly held view of electronics as out of the control and intellectual grasp of the average person; the domain of the engineer, programmer and enthusiast with his or her special aptitude. This need not be true, but teachers' and parents' lack of experience with electronics is in danger of denying young learners access to the mainstream of modern technology.

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  • Technology and science education

    Jones, Alister; Compton, Vicki (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The incorporation of technology into the school curriculum is part of a worldwide trend in education. The way in which technology is incorporated depends on which country the reform is initiated in. The New Zealand Curriculum Framework (Ministry of Education, 1993a) includes science and technology as distinct learning areas. This chapter considers the view of technology expressed in both science in the New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1993b) and in Technology in the New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1995). The chapter is divided into four sections. Firstly, the concept of technology in the science curriculum is identified and discussed; secondly, the use of some types of technological application to enhance the learning of science outcomes is considered; thirdly, the technology curriculum itself is discussed in order to highlight the concept of technology underpinning this statement so that comparisons can be made with the concept employed in the science curriculum, and finally the introduction of technology outcomes by science teachers in a science environment is explored.

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