29 results for Book item, 1990

  • Contra the Hypothetical Persona in Music

    Davies, Stephen (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Is Architecture Art?

    Davies, Stephen (1994)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Why Listen to Sad Music if It Makes One Feel Sad?

    Davies, Stephen (1995)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Evaluation of Music

    Davies, Stephen (1994)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sovereigns, Sovereignty and the Treaty of Waitangi

    Davies, Stephen; Ewin, RE (1992)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • "Come, let me clutch thee": Macbeth and the Marvelous Text

    Bishop, Thomas (1999)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Examines the role of Biblical language and Biblically-derived notions of the sublime text in creating the peculiar atmosphere of Macbeth.

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  • Ada

    Boyd, Brian (1995)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Welcome to the Block': Priglashenie na kazn/ Invitation to a Beheading: A Documentary Record

    Boyd, Brian (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • “We’re just New Zealanders”: The Politics of Pakeha Identity

    Bell, Shirley (1996)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Geological Information in New Zealand

    Leaming, Elva (1999)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand consists of two large is1ands--some 270,000 square kilometers in area--straddling a major crustal plate boundary. The present landscape is the highest part of a submerged subcontinent that broke away from Gondwana some 80 million years ago. To the northeast the Pacific oceanic plate is subducting westward, and to the southwest the Tasman seafloor is subducting eastward beneath the Campbell Plateau. These two subduction zones are linked through the transcurrent Alpine Fault. In the mid 19th Century two world-famous geologists contributed to the country's geological exploration. Hochstetter, from Austria, established a tradition of systematic geological mapping, and Hector, from Canada, founded the New Zealand Geological Survey. New Zealand's national geological organization, now the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS), continues to publish a broad spectrum of geological literature and maps. Its library holds the largest collection of geological literature pertaining to New Zealand. The six universities that teach geology and earth sciences each have library collections of a high standard. The University of Auckland Geology Collection is housed in the Science Library with an area that is a focal point for geological information and literature research.

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  • Building the theory of comparative HRM

    Boxall, Peter (1999)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Content: v. 1. Origins, developments and critical analyses -- v. 2. Comparative, international and strategic human resource management -- v. 3. Emergent HRM issues for the new millennium.

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  • From assimilation to biculturalism: Changing patterns in Maori-Pakeha relationships

    Thomas, David R.; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1996)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter examines the changing patterns of inter-ethnic relationships among Maori and Pakeha in New Zealand, specifically the moves from assimilation towards biculturalism. The impact of recent debate about the Treaty of Waitangi is described and examples of bicultural policies and their consequences are outlined.

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  • The contructivist paradigm and some implications for science content and pedagogy

    Carr, Malcolm; Barker, Miles; Bell, Beverley; Biddulph, Fred; Jones, Alister; Kirkwood, Valda; Pearson, John; Symington, David (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Through a comparison of the widely-held traditional view of science with the constructivist view of science, we argue that the constructivist view of the content of science has important implications for classroom teaching and learning. This alternative view of science concepts as human constructs, scrutinised by application of the rules of the game of science, raises many challenges for teachers. Reconceptualisation of teachers' views of the nature of science and of learning in science is important for a constructivist pedagogy. We argue here that open discussion of the 'rules of the game' of science would contribute to better learning in the classroom, since learners would be better equipped to change their existing concepts by knowing more about the nature of science itself.

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  • Time and Timelessness in the Traditions of Early Greek Oral Poetry and Archaic Vase-Painting

    Mackay, Elizabeth (1996)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Two Youths from Boiotia

    Mackay, Elizabeth (1995)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Information literacy curriculum & assessment: Implications for schools from New Zealand.

    Brown, Gavin (1999)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The development of the ???information society??? or ???information age??? creates a global context for instruction in information skills. Ensuring that students have skills in handling, understanding, and producing information is increasingly considered a vital educational goal. This chapter reviews the literature on information literacy, focusing on the common elements and aspects of information skills sequences and components. The New Zealand curriculum, resource, and research scene relevant to information skills is reviewed and evaluated against international trends. Present trends and developments in the assessment and measurement of information skills are reviewed. Possible implications for the information literate school are examined.

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  • Technology education in the New Zealand curriculum

    Jones, Alister (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter, the way in which experience of existing school programmes influences teacher perceptions of technology education is discussed, and reasons for teaching technology are outlined. A relationship between technology and technology education is suggested and the structure of technology education in the New Zealand technology curriculum is described. A particular focus is the role of technological activities in technology education, and this is developed in the final section.

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  • Towards an understanding of thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the formation of clay minerals from volcanic glass under various environmental conditions

    Hodder, A.P.W.; Naish, T.R.; Lowe, David J. (1996-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    lmogolite is the kinetically and thermodynamically favoured weathering product from rhyolitic volcanic glass in the soil-forming environment. However, on thermodynamic grounds imogolite would also appear to be the favoured alteration product of rhyolitic glass deposited in the nearshore marine environment. On the basis that the rate of conversion of glass to clay minerals is a function of the solubility of the clay mineral, smectite is expected to be formed under mildly diagenetic conditions, and formed more rapidly than imogolite in soil. The derived activation energies for formation of imogolite from glass in soils are appropriate for a diffusion controlled reaction, and appear consistent with the diffusion of the tetrahedrally co-ordinated species Al[iv](OH)₂(H2Q)⁺. In the marine environment, however the mechanism for all reactions appear to be surface reaction control.

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  • Lakes

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1992-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Lakes have always held an aesthetic fascination for people; they figure prominently in both art and literature and have even been endowed with spiritual qualities. For example, the nineteenth century American writer Henry D. Thoreau (1854) considered a lake to be 'the landscape's most beautiful and expressive feature. It is the earth's eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature'. More prosaically, lakes are also of considerable geomorphological interest as dynamic landfonns originating in varied and often complex ways.

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  • The middle Waikato Basin and hills

    Selby, Michael J.; Lowe, David J. (1992-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The middle Waikato (or Hamilton) Basin is a roughly oval-shaped depression more than 80 km north to south and more than 40 km wide. The basin, except in the south, is almost completely surrounded by ranges up to 300 m high, broken by only a few gaps. In the south the basin floor rises gradually and merges with the dissected plateaux of the King Country.

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