699 results for Book item, 2000

  • Computer literacy: where are nurse educators on the continuum?

    Hanley, E. (2006)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Computers are becoming ubiquitous in health and education, and it is expected that nurses from undergraduate nursing programmes are computer literate when they enter the workforce. Similarly nurse educators are expected to be computer literate to model the use of information technology in their workplace. They are expected to use email for communication and a range of computer applications for presentation of course materials and reports. Additionally as more courses are delivered in flexible mode educators require more comprehensive computing skills, including confidence and competence in a range of applications. A cohort of nurse educators from one tertiary institution was surveyed to assess their perceived computer literacy and how they attained this. A questionnaire that covered seven domains of computer literacy was used to assess this. The results were illuminating and identified specific training needs for this group. Their perceived lack of skill with Groupwise email and the student database program are of concern as these are essential tools for nurse educators at this polytechnic.

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  • Ethics and practice: Australian and New Zealand conservation contexts

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Scott, Marcelle (2009-01)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • An extension of real life?: Understanding the experiences of two female chatroom operators.

    Bowker, N. (2005)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The Logic of Terror

    Hokowhitu, Brendan (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this chapter from Huia Publishers.

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  • Credit Union Otago: Prospering in a competitive environment

    Sibbald, Alexander (2002)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    This case study presents an opportunity to identify and discuss operational management stratagies pursued by Credit Union Otago in particular, and the credit union industry in general, in their bid to survive and grow whilst aiming to achieve both economic and social objectives.

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  • Scalability of techniques for online geographic visualization of Web site hits

    Stanger, Nigel (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Extremely large data sets are now commonplace, and they are often visualized through the World Wide Web. Scalability of web-based visualization techniques is thus a key issue. This paper investigates the scalability of four representative techniques for dynamic map generation and display (e.g., for visualizing geographic sources of web site hits): generating a single composite map image, overlaying images on an underlying base map and two variants of overlaying HTML on a base map. These four techniques embody a mixture of different display technologies and distribution styles (three server-side and one distributed across both client and server). Each technique was applied to 20 synthetic data sets of increasing size, and the data set volume, elapsed time and memory consumption were measured. The results show that all four techniques are suitable for small data sets comprising a few thousand points, but that the two HTML techniques scale to larger data sets very poorly across all three variables.

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  • 'Bills of Exchange'

    Hare, Christopher (2000)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Computer literacy: where are nurse educators on the continuum?

    Hanley, E. (2006)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Computers are becoming ubiquitous in health and education, and it is expected that nurses from undergraduate nursing programmes are computer literate when they enter the workforce. Similarly nurse educators are expected to be computer literate to model the use of information technology in their workplace. They are expected to use email for communication and a range of computer applications for presentation of course materials and reports. Additionally as more courses are delivered in flexible mode educators require more comprehensive computing skills, including confidence and competence in a range of applications. A cohort of nurse educators from one tertiary institution was surveyed to assess their perceived computer literacy and how they attained this. A questionnaire that covered seven domains of computer literacy was used to assess this. The results were illuminating and identified specific training needs for this group. Their perceived lack of skill with Groupwise email and the student database program are of concern as these are essential tools for nurse educators at this polytechnic.

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  • Face Value. Perception and Knowledge of Others’ Happiness

    Zamuner, Edoardo (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Enhancing Students Conceptual Understanding of Chemistry through the SOLO Taxonomy

    Gan, Joo (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Designing literacy education as modes of meaning in globalised and situated contexts: Towards a restoration of the self through embodied knowing

    Thwaites, Trevor (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The world of the twenty-first century is one that presents humans with diverse forms of identity, loyalty, and sense of place. The nation state appears all but redundant in this time of transnationalism and transculturalism, as ongoing migrations and re-affirmations of identity produce transient loyalties which make policy development problematic in areas such as education. The new empire is a global one, reflecting corporate economic ambition and territorial expansion—a type of colonisation by capitalist interests that we might call “globalisation”. Associated with this global empire are the new technologies of trading and communication which have produced new societal structures, such as social networks, that display various formations of information and cultural amateurs who promote themselves through the voyeuristic possibilities of the World Wide Web. The preparation of students for their life in these scenarios has been guided by governments and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), convinced that the future lies in a vaporous ambition called the ‘knowledge-economy’—a further complication for education policy. Where does that leave the self as an identity requiring forms of efficacy, personal ambition, and a sense of being-in-a-physical-world? This paper explores one facet of this question which is linked both to concepts of literacy and to the embodied self as one way of demonstrating that there are strategies for responding to the new environment. This way suggests giving agency to learners through a radical and embodied means of constructing knowledge and literacy that seeks to retain the humanness in schooling and which potentially empowers learners through the possibilities opened up by these ‘new’ pedagogies.

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  • Phage Integrases for Mediating Genomic Integration and DNA Recombination

    Maucksch, Christof (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    φC31 integrase is a site specific recombinase derived from the Streptomyces phage. In the phage lifecycle, the enzyme mediates lysogeny by mediating recombination between specific sequences termed attB (present in the bacterial DNA) and attP (present in the phage genome). Screening the enzyme activity in mammalian cells provided positive results and also showed that the enzyme retained its property of site specific recombination into mammalian genomes. Mammalian genomes have been shown to contain sequences that are similar to the wild type attP sequence of the Streptomyces phage genome and experiments with the integrase in mammalian cells showed that it could mediate recombination and subsequent integration of any DNA bearing an attB site into these pseudoattP sites. ...

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  • Engaging pedagogies for teacher education: Considering a modest critical pedagogy for preparing tomorrow's teachers

    Tinning, Richard (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Forms of participation in urban redevelopment projects - the differing roles of public and stakeholder contributions to design decision making processes

    Hunt, John (2006)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper examines how political commitment to participatory design within the context of a major urban redevelopment project was translated into a strategy and a course of action for achieving effective participation within a demanding project timeframe. The project in question involves a new transport interchange for the city of Auckland (New Zealand), the redevelopment of a number of heritage buildings, and the introduction of new buildings to create a mixed use precinct covering three city blocks. The project, currently being implemented, has involved extensive public consultation and stakeholder participation as it has proceeded through the stages of project visioning, an open public design competition, and the development of the competition winning design. The paper draws a distinction between the contributions of stakeholders versus the public at large to the decision-making process, outlines the different kinds of participatory processes adopted by the local authority (Auckland City Council) to effectively engage and involve these two different groups and the stages in the evolution of the project at which these different contributions were introduced. The model of ‘open design’ proposed by van Gunsteren and van Loon is used as a basis for explaining the success of multi-stakeholder inputs at a crucial stage in project development. The paper concludes by examining the limits of applicability of the ‘open design’ model in the context of urban redevelopment projects in which there is broad public interest, and by suggesting a number of design decision support guidelines for the management of participatory processes.

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  • A Global Culture of Terror: A Marxist Riposte

    McLaren, Peter (2006)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Olli-Pekka Moisio, University of Jyvskyl, Finland Juha Suoranta, University of Minnesota, USA (eds.) The aim of this book is to raise current social, political, ...

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  • Decolonizing Democratic Education: Marxian Ruminations

    McLaren, Peter (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Nietzsche's Evolutionary Ethics

    Small, Robin (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • On the Beach: Or the 'Unbearable Scandal' of Shrinking Swimwear

    Daley, Caroline (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • From Floral Clocks to Civic Flourish

    Aitken Rose, EA (2006)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Conflict of Laws, Illegality and Exchange Control, Sovereign Immunity'

    Hare, Christopher (2001)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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