15 results for Book item, Modify

  • Children and vulnerability

    Atwool, Nicola (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • The Fountain of Fish: Ontological Collisions at Sea

    Salmond, Mary (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Fluorescence: a novel method for determining manuka honey floral purity

    Loomes, Kerry; Loomes, KM; Braggins, TJ; Bong, Nee; Lin, B; Prijic, G (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Manuka honey, harvested from Leptospermum scoparium, is New Zealand's most recognised honey type and commands a premium due to health‐related benefits. However, the plant's distribution, relative to other species flowering simultaneously, allows honeybees to incorporate alternative nectars into the honey. Melissopalynological analysis in New Zealand is often unrepresentative due to the presence of many pollen‐bearing sources; consequently, alternative means of categorising manuka honey were examined. RP‐HPLC revealed that manuka honey contains distinct compounds, of which were relatively enriched and not present in the other New Zealand monofloral honeys. These main candidate compounds were isolated and have been described by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, synthesised to confirm structure, and as standards. These compounds, Leptosperin and Lepteridine, are a methyl syringate glycoside and pteridine derivative, respectively. Examination of these compounds revealed unique fluorescence signatures, this fluorescence could be detected in manuka honey samples the signal used to confirm that a honey was solely or predominantly consisted of L. scoparium nectar. Commercial manuka honeys were assessed by traditional analytical techniques, and comparisons were made with fluorescence signature; the fluorescence technique determined the authenticity of the honeys accurately.

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  • Use of polyurethane foam in orthopaedic biomechanical experimentation and simulation

    Shim, Bo; Böhme, J; Josten, C; Anderson, Iain (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Multisensor data fusion strategies for advanced driver assistance systems

    Rezaei, Mahdi; Sabzevari, R (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Teaching theory into practice: A model from opera

    Camp, Gregory (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Quantum-inspired particle swarm optimization for feature selection and parameter optimization in evolving spiking neural networks for classification tasks

    Abdull Hamed, HN; Kasabov, N; Shamsuddin, SM (2011-08-03)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Introduction: Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) was introduced in 1995 by Russell Eberhart and James Kennedy (Eberhart & Kennedy, 1995). PSO is a biologically-inspired technique based around the study of collective behaviour in decentralized and self-organized animal society systems. The systems are typically made up from a population of candidates (particles) interacting with one another within their environment (swarm) to solve a given problem. Because of its efficiency and simplicity, PSO has been successfully applied as an optimizer in many applications such as function optimization, artificial neural network training, fuzzy system control. However, despite recent research and development, there is an opportunity to find the most effective methods for parameter optimization and feature selection tasks. This chapter deals with the problem of feature (variable) and parameter optimization for neural network models, utilising a proposed Quantum–inspired PSO (QiPSO) method. In this method the features of the model are represented probabilistically as a quantum bit (qubit) vector and the model parameter values as real numbers. The principles of quantum superposition and quantum probability are used to accelerate the search for an optimal set of features, that combined through co-evolution with a set of optimised parameter values, will result in a more accurate computational neural network model. The method has been applied to the problem of feature and parameter optimization in Evolving Spiking Neural Network (ESNN) for classification. A swarm of particles is used to find the most accurate classification model for a given classification task. The QiPSO will be integrated within ESNN where features and parameters are simultaneously and more efficiently optimized. A hybrid particle structure is required for the qubit and real number data types. In addition, an improved search strategy has been introduced to find the most relevant and eliminate the irrelevant features on a synthetic dataset. The method is tested on a benchmark classification problem. The proposed method results in the design of faster and more accurate neural network classification models than the ones optimised through the use of standard evolutionary optimization algorithms. This chapter is organized as follows. Section 2 introduces PSO with quantum information principles and an improved feature search strategy used later in the developed method. Section 3 is an overview of ESNN, while Section 4 gives details of the integrated structure and the experimental results. Finally, Section 5 concludes this chapter.

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  • Digital Smarts: Enhancing learning and teaching [Introduction]

    Wright, Noeline; Forbes, Dianne Leslie (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This book is a partnership on many levels—between co-editors, with and among the other chapter authors, external, international reviewers, and eventually with you, the book’s readership. Our colleagues have also had to trust us in the mentoring, leadership and fruition of this project. We also hope that the work is trusted in the sense of having a quality assurance process that stands up as rigorous and befitting an academic text. We will address that aspect in more detail later in this introduction. Partnership, trust and integrity are implicit in any edited book development that grows from within a shared context such as ours, the University of Waikato’s Faculty of Education.

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  • Skilled Migration in and Out of New Zealand: Immigrants, Workers, Students and Emigrants

    Bedford, R (2012-11-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Climate change and grape wine quality: a GIS approach to analysing New Zealand wine region

    Shanmuganathan, S; Narayanan, A; Sallis, P (2012-12-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The influences of seasonal climate variability on the phenological dynamics of certain terrestrial communities observed mostly since the mid‐20th century are seen as leading to unprecedented consequences (Richard, et al., 2009). The potential impacts of the phenomenon on the phenological development and in turn on the species composition of certain specific plant, insect, aquatic, bird and animal communities evolved in parallel over millions of years to form the existing “make‐up” of what is referred to as the “biodiversity” or “endemic species” of these natural habitats, are depicted as significant (Peñuelas and Estiarte, 2010). Scientific research results have revealed that the recent rapid climate change effects on these systems, more specifically during the last few decades, have resulted in presently being seen “temporal mismatch in interacting species”. Such ecological observations are even described as early vital signs of imminent “regime shifts” in the current base climate of these regions or latitudes (Schweiger, Settele, Kudrna, & Klotz, 2008: Saino, et al., 2009). On the other hand, climatologists portray the major cause for such rapid “climate regime shifts” and the consequent impacts on the survival of so called co‐evolved species, as anthropogenic (Anderson, Kelly, Ladley, Molloy, & Terry, 2011). For this reason, research relating to climate change impacts on vegetation spread over landscapes, phenological development and population dynamics of susceptible communities, in some cases even with potential threat for total extinction of “endangered species” under future climate change, has in recent years gained enormous momentum. In fact, this unprecedented attention has also drawn greater scrutiny and controversies at never seen before proportions in a way hindering any form of formal research on the phenomenon (Shanmuganathan & Sallis, 2010).

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  • The International Journal of Wellbeing: An open access success story

    Weijers, Dan M.; Jarden, Aaron (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Academics have long had the advantage of access to university libraries and their expensive subscriptions to scholarly journals. Critics of traditional journal publishing have complained that placing science and scholarship behind a paywall limits its potential. One solution to this problem is the emergence of open access journals. In this chapter, authors Weijers and Jarden offer a case study of a platinum open access journal they founded: the International Journal of Wellbeing. In their discussion of this new journal they offer both philosophical and practical insights that guide their work. They also point to often overlooked issues regarding open scholarship. One of these is the huge numbers of unaffiliated faculty or faculty from non-Western universities, all of whom suffer barriers to access to expensive journals. The authors look to increasing openness of journals to solve this and other problems.

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  • Developing digital smarts in initial teacher education: What motivates new teachers to continue using digital technologies for learning?

    Wright, Noeline (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The New Zealand Curriculum, the overarching curriculum document for both primary and secondary education, enshrines an expectation that teachers engage in Teaching as Inquiry. This is seen as linking to both evidence-informed practice and evolving pedagogical content knowledge. In a rapidly developing, complex mobile digital education, the need for teachers to constantly evolve their technological pedagogical content knowledge is pressing. In initial teacher education (ITE), one challenge is how teacher educators support ITE students’ development of evidence-informed reflective practices with digital technologies to match their content knowledge. For ITE students, this is heightened because they are growing their pedagogical knowledge concurrently with learning to incorporate digital technologies in lessons, mostly for the first time. ITE students are in the position of working out how to appropriate unfamiliar digital affordances and devices for learning in unfamiliar classrooms of students, in unfamiliar schools, and sometimes teaching unfamiliar content. The focus of this chapter is, through a qualitative, thematically analysed study of 74 ITE students, an examination of their efforts in this regard via online postings about their practicum experiences as they experimented with digital technologies in secondary school classrooms. The key question for the study was What do secondary graduate ITE students come to value regarding using digital technologies in learning contexts? Findings showed these students creatively applied digital technologies to learning contexts, while adapting to differences among schools and their technological constraints or affordances. Findings also suggest that continuance theory can help understand ITE students’ decisions about what prompts them to continue using digital technologies for learning, and how continuance theory links to agency, structures and cultural practices.

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  • Smart or Smarting: Student-library engagement in online distance education

    Ferrier-Watson, Anne (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This small-scale mixed methods study used surveys and focus groups to investigate the challenges faced by a cohort of online learners at the University of Waikato when seeking and referencing information for course assessments. The research also investigated the type of library support students value, as well as the barriers to their engagement with library information services. Findings revealed half the cohort reported they seldom used the library or library services during their degree; nearly three quarters of the cohort reported problems finding information; and over three quarters of the cohort did not seek help from the library. However, over three quarters of students reported they engaged with library referencing resources. This chapter makes observations about what it means to be ‘digitally smart’ in an academic library context, and suggests ways that library information services can be better provided and promoted to an information-saturated and time poor student audience.

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  • Energy efficiency and rental accommodation: Dealing with split incentives

    Barton, Barry (2014)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Energy law and energy policy, to which Adrian Bradbrook has contributed so much, are significant for several reasons. The first reason, very relevant to the concern of this chapter, is to meet human needs. In New Zealand dwelling-houses are often colder than international standards stipulate, and that causes health problems, especially for the young, the old and other vulnerable members of the population. The second main reason is the significant adverse effect on the environment of the production of energy and its use. The third reason is climate change; energy production is the main source of greenhouse gas emissions.

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  • "It's about the relationships that we build": iPad-supported relational pedagogy (Ngā Hononga) with young children

    Khoo, Elaine G.L.; Merry, Rosina; Bennett, Timothy; MacMillan, Nadine (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Although iPads have gained much attention and are being increasingly adopted into educational practices, concerns exist as to the suitability and extent of their use with and by young children. This chapter reports on the findings of a qualitative study exploring iPad use in the sustaining and extending of relationships in an early childhood education and care centre in New Zealand. Guided by the notion of a relational pedagogy, espoused in Te Whāriki, the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, the research involved collaborations with two early childhood teachers and children at the centre to obtain perspectives of teachers, young children and their parents/caregivers regarding iPad adoption and use. The findings highlight the potential of using iPads to support and further develop young children’s relationships with people, places and objects within their immediate contexts, which are underpinned importantly by a clear teacher awareness, adoption of and being informed by a relational pedagogy perspective. This has implications for how teachers can be supported to use the iPad to create meaningful and relevant teaching and learning experiences for and with young children.

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