173 results for Book item, 2008

  • The Logic of Terror

    Hokowhitu, Brendan (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this chapter from Huia Publishers.

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  • Scalability of techniques for online geographic visualization of Web site hits

    Stanger, Nigel (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Extremely large data sets are now commonplace, and they are often visualized through the World Wide Web. Scalability of web-based visualization techniques is thus a key issue. This paper investigates the scalability of four representative techniques for dynamic map generation and display (e.g., for visualizing geographic sources of web site hits): generating a single composite map image, overlaying images on an underlying base map and two variants of overlaying HTML on a base map. These four techniques embody a mixture of different display technologies and distribution styles (three server-side and one distributed across both client and server). Each technique was applied to 20 synthetic data sets of increasing size, and the data set volume, elapsed time and memory consumption were measured. The results show that all four techniques are suitable for small data sets comprising a few thousand points, but that the two HTML techniques scale to larger data sets very poorly across all three variables.

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  • Grammaticalization and Strategies in Resolving Subject Marking Paradoxes: The Case of Tsimshianic

    Brown, Jason; Peterson, T (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents a case study of what we will call ergative/nominative paradoxes, which we claim are found in the Tsimshianic language family, but which are possibly found in other languages as well. Such paradoxes are said to arise when both nominative and ergative morphology is simultaneously indexed or related to the same subject. Although these languages manifest this subject marking paradox in different ways, we conjecture that the paradox itself is the result of an ergative system decaying into an accusative one, and that one strategy for languages to relieve the pressure of such a paradox is to develop new paradigms of differential subject marking.

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  • Valuation of Yoruba Sacred Shrines, Monuments, and Groves for Compensation

    Aluko, BT; Omisore, EO; Amidu, Abdul-Rasheed (2008-07-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A sacred site is a place, which is considered holy and is partially or wholly reserved for magico – religious or ceremonial functions. Because of this, compensation valuation upon compulsory acquisition of these places is a complex and specialised one requiring the interpretation of law and our past cultural heritage. Consequently, the chapter, adopting a survey technique and simple descriptive statistics, examines sacred places, the provisions of the enabling compensation laws, the valuation process and the attendant problems in the assessment of compensation that fully equalled the pecuniary detriments faced by owners upon acquisition of these sites in the Yorubaland. This chapter reveals the conflicting provisions in the compensation enactments and the threat of the extinction of the role of traditional worshippers or priests, which is an outcome of the assessment of compensation of the places in the study area. In addition, based on empirical evidence of recent transactions on sacred places in the country the chapter concludes that compensation can hardly be adequate for sacred sites because of their social and cultural importance functions, although a review of the compensation laws, as well as training of curators of shrines and sacred places, may be necessary to ensure reliability of compensation valuation in the Yorubaland portion of Nigeria.

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  • Designing literacy education as modes of meaning in globalised and situated contexts: Towards a restoration of the self through embodied knowing

    Thwaites, Trevor (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The world of the twenty-first century is one that presents humans with diverse forms of identity, loyalty, and sense of place. The nation state appears all but redundant in this time of transnationalism and transculturalism, as ongoing migrations and re-affirmations of identity produce transient loyalties which make policy development problematic in areas such as education. The new empire is a global one, reflecting corporate economic ambition and territorial expansion—a type of colonisation by capitalist interests that we might call “globalisation”. Associated with this global empire are the new technologies of trading and communication which have produced new societal structures, such as social networks, that display various formations of information and cultural amateurs who promote themselves through the voyeuristic possibilities of the World Wide Web. The preparation of students for their life in these scenarios has been guided by governments and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), convinced that the future lies in a vaporous ambition called the ‘knowledge-economy’—a further complication for education policy. Where does that leave the self as an identity requiring forms of efficacy, personal ambition, and a sense of being-in-a-physical-world? This paper explores one facet of this question which is linked both to concepts of literacy and to the embodied self as one way of demonstrating that there are strategies for responding to the new environment. This way suggests giving agency to learners through a radical and embodied means of constructing knowledge and literacy that seeks to retain the humanness in schooling and which potentially empowers learners through the possibilities opened up by these ‘new’ pedagogies.

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  • Phage Integrases for Mediating Genomic Integration and DNA Recombination

    Maucksch, Christof (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    φC31 integrase is a site specific recombinase derived from the Streptomyces phage. In the phage lifecycle, the enzyme mediates lysogeny by mediating recombination between specific sequences termed attB (present in the bacterial DNA) and attP (present in the phage genome). Screening the enzyme activity in mammalian cells provided positive results and also showed that the enzyme retained its property of site specific recombination into mammalian genomes. Mammalian genomes have been shown to contain sequences that are similar to the wild type attP sequence of the Streptomyces phage genome and experiments with the integrase in mammalian cells showed that it could mediate recombination and subsequent integration of any DNA bearing an attB site into these pseudoattP sites. ...

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  • Macropolitical forces and micropolitical realities: Implementing Te Whāriki

    Hedges, Helen; Nuttall, J (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Conserving Urban Landscape Heritage: a Geographical Approach

    Whitehand, JWR; Gu, Kai (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Translators' Web Search Behavior and Translation Performance: A Framework for Longitudinal Studies

    Enriquez Raido, V (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Decolonizing Democratic Education: Marxian Ruminations

    McLaren, Peter (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bridges to tomorrow: Mapping the work/life/learning histories of students in bridging education

    Bartley, Allen; Passells, Vaolesi; Tipi, Fa'amalua (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Reports on a pilot study to map the pathways into a university bridging education programme of a cohort of adult learners. The study developed a unique methodological approach, the work/life/learning history, to trace students' pathways into the bridging programme.

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  • Developing Research-Based Education: A case study in teaching Interactive Digital Media Design

    Winters, Tara (2008-08-27)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Art and design degree courses at the Elam School of Fine Arts, The University of Auckland are research-based degree programmes, and as such, place an emphasis on interpreting, interrogating and experimenting with ideas, concepts and contexts. The challenge of designing curriculum that effectively integrates research with learning presents itself in this teaching and learning context. Facilitating divergent approaches to art and design thinking and making, and encouraging risk-taking and the challenging of established ideas, conventions and models is a complex task for educators. Research-based working methodologies seek to question, extend, invent and innovate, a central tenet being the construction of new knowledge (including the notion of knowledge new to that learner, and not necessarily new knowledge per se). Research approaches to subject learning contribute positively in critical ways to sound pedagogical aims concerning art and design education as the site where understandings of the nature of the subject of learning, and of conceptions of learning itself, are challenged and broadened. In response to this challenge this paper presents a case study at subject level describing an attempt to embed in the learning experience (at a philosophical as well as practical level) characteristics of a research based investigation drawing on pedagogical theories of ‘transformative learning’ (Mezirow, 1991) and, particular to design pedagogy, ‘learning and the design entity’ (Davies & Reid, 2001). The study describes the rationale, ideas and methodology behind the design and delivery of a third year project unit titled “Interactive Digital Media Design”. In answer to the challenge of aligning research with learning the approach centered on a number of ways of problematising the project to raise fundamental questions about the subject of study intended to promote a research style engagement. This included conceptualizing the digital medium as unique as a representational system for carrying ideas, information and concepts and prompting students to engage in alternatives that went beyond existing principles and conventions through questioning where those principles and conventions derive from and reflecting on their usefulness as part of a progressive, research-driven approach to new media design.

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  • Stacks on the mill, more on still: Eve Armstrong and a short history on heaps, stacks and piles

    Smith, John (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bosnian or Bosniac: Aspects of a Contemporary Slavic Language Question

    Greenberg, Robert (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bioacoustics and the lateral line system of fishes

    Webb, JF; Montgomery, John; Mogodans, J (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Senses of Fish: Chemosensory, Visual and Octavolateralis

    Montgomery, John; Carton, Alexander (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Lolita: Scene and Unseen

    Boyd, Brian (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Carpenter, VM; Jesson, Jocelyn; Roberts, Peter; Stephenson, Maxine (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • From Plato to plaid

    Shand, Peter (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the late 1980s, Chris and Helen Cherry’s fashion label Workshop occupied a small store on the southern corner of the Century Arcade and central Auckland’s High Street. As well as what were their trademark coloured denim and linen garments, stock included tee-shirts with screened images of episodes from Giotto’s Scrovegni Chapel, overlain with spidery Batman forms, dense rubbery doily patterns and simple, one-word texts in a quick, easy hand. Twenty years on, Swanndri, the iconic manufacturer of good keen bloke-wear, operates a fl agship store in Nuffi eld Street in Newmarket. The Karen Walker range designed for the label includes tee-shirts where the bushwear’s recognisable check is rendered as if in softer palette oil pastel and with a knowing, cheeky nod to the checkered patterning of both Swanndri and the global fashion phenomenon Burberry.

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  • Taking a sociocultural approach: What does it really mean?

    Hill, Edite (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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