263 results for Book item, 2011

  • Occupational science: the study of occupation

    Wright-St Clair, VA; Hocking, C (2011-10-16)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter explores how occupational science is informing occupational therapy practice. Firstly the discussion looks at occupational science as a basic science underpinning occupational therapy knowledge, before recent developments in occupational science are show-cased as a way of illustrating its growth as an applied science. Along the way, real world international examples are offered. Each highlights how the ‘science’ of occupational science is guiding evidence-based occupational therapy practice. Each example, in its own way, illustrates occupational science ‘in play’ within the everyday practice worlds of occupational therapists.

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  • Data provenance and management in Radio Astronomy: a stream computing approach

    Mahmoud, M; Ensor, A; Biem, A; Elmegreen, B; and Gulyaev, S (2011-12-16)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    New approaches for data provenance and data management (DPDM) are required for mega science projects like the Square Kilometer Array, characterized by extremely large data volume and intense data rates, therefore demanding innovative and highly efficient computational paradigms. In this context, we explore a stream-computing approach with the emphasis on the use of accelerators. In particular, we make use of a new generation of high performance stream-based parallelization middleware known as InfoSphere Streams. Its viability for managing and ensuring interoperability and integrity of signal processing data pipelines is demonstrated in radio astronomy. IBM InfoSphere Streams embraces the stream-computing paradigm. It is a shift from conventional data mining techniques (involving analysis of existing data from databases) towards real-time analytic processing. We discuss using InfoSphere Streams for effective DPDM in radio astronomy and propose a way in which InfoSphere Streams can be utilized for large antennae arrays. We present a case-study: the InfoSphere Streams implementation of an autocorrelating spectrometer, and using this example we discuss the advantages of the stream-computing approach and the utilization of hardware accelerators.

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  • Storm over the Starship: A geosemiotic analysis of brand co-ownership

    Conroy, DM; Brookes, R (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Progression in the knowledge and philosophy of technology

    Compton, Vicki; Compton, AD (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Opportunities and impediments: Drama in vocational education

    Heyward, Paul (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Critical Pedagogy as Revolutionary Practice

    McLaren, Peter (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Behaviour of invader ship rats experimentally released behind a pest-proof fence, Maungatautari, New Zealand

    Innes, J; Watts, C; Fitzgerald, NL; Thornburrow, D; Burns, B; MacKay, Jamie; Speedy, C (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Six ship (roof, black) rats (Rattus rattus) were cage-trapped adjacent to a pest-proof fence and released with radio transmitters inside the 65 ha pest-free exclosure at Maungatautari, North Island, New Zealand, to mimic reinvasion. Unexpectedly, four of the six rats climbed back out of the exclosure and returned to their original home ranges after periods ranging from a few hours to seven days. All six rats travelled along the fence top at some time during follows, and only three of the six used tracking tunnels set on a 50 m grid inside the exclosure to detect invaders. The rats that remained inside the fence stayed within C. 100m of the release point for about three days, then made increasingly large (to 1100m) movements into the reserve. Resultant range lengths greatly exceeded those of four other rats radio-tracked outside the fence where rat density was higher. This behaviour is very similar to that reported for experimentally released house mice (Mus musculus) and Norway rats (R. norvegicus) on islands. These results suggest that a) some invading ship rats may themselves vacate a fenced sanctuary without encountering efforts to detect and remove them; b) rats at low density have much larger movements than occur in home ranges at typically higher mainland densities, and c) managers should target rat invaders with detection and killing devices within 100 m of a fence breach for at least three days, and some traps should be set on top of the fence.

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  • Māori Representation, Local Government and the Auckland Council

    Sullivan, Ann (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The paper discusses the serious under representation of Maori on local government councils and issues of identity, obligation and types of representation on the Auckland Council.

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  • The two-phase method for multiobjective combinatorial optimization problems

    Przybylski, A; Gandibleux, X; Ehrgott, Matthias (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Performers' Rights

    Morgan, Owen (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Sanctity of Bread: Missionaries and the promotion of wheat growing among the New Zealand Māori

    Petrie, Hazel (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Seeing What Others Feel

    Zamuner, Edoardo (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Fluid Forms: owning water in Australia

    Strang, Veronica (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Māori, psychology and the law: Considerations for bicultural practice

    Cooper, Erana; Rickard, S; Waitoki, W (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Satisfaction in a Horse: The Perception and Assimilation of an Exotic Animal into Maori Custom Law

    Petrie, Hazel (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Political Economies as Moral Economies: Commodities, Gifts and Public Goods

    Murdock, Graham (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Colonisation britannique'; 'Églises'; 'John Coleridge Patteson'; 'John Gibson Paton'

    Laracy, Hugh (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A turn for the worse? Some recent developments in the school sector

    Carpenter, Vicki; Thrupp, M (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction A persistent feature of the New Zealand school system is the so-called ‘long tail of underachievement’ by economically poor and usually Māori and Pasifika children, and the pattern of much higher achievement by middle class and usually Pakeha and Asian children. The 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) results on the Reading Literacy of 15-year-olds, demonstrate that “among the eight top or high-performing countries or economies, New Zealand had the widest range of scores …

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  • Healing: Towards an understanding of Māori child maltreatment.

    Cooper, Erana; Wharewera-Mika, J (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Literacy 'by hook or by crook': differentiated access to literacy in secondary English Classrooms.

    Rozas Gomez, Claudia (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Ministry of Education has delivered a clear mandate in the last decade for schools to focus on literacy and the literacy development of their students (for example Literacy leadership in schools Y 9–13 (MoE, 2002) and Effective literacy strategies in years 9 to 13 (MoE, 2004). This article is a discussion of some initial data from a work in progress that seeks to consider how different forms of literacy may be targeted at different groups of students in English departments in secondary schools. It examines the nature and content of these programmes in relation to The New Zealand curriculum (MoE, 2007) aims, which stresses the importance of creative and critical capabilities. Using both theoretical and qualitative analysis, this article examines the ‘effects’ of current policy (curriculum and assessment) structures. It seeks to explore how these structures may produce particular teaching and learning practices. Members of English departments in the wider Auckland area were invited to participate in the study and take part in interviews about their targeted programmes. The qualitative data analysis pays attention to how discourses of equity and opportunity are played out in the decisions that English teachers make about what types of literacy to ‘give’ to students.

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