141 results for Book item, 2015

  • Commercial decisions in the Supreme Court of New Zealand: The prominence of agency law in the first ten years

    Watts, Peter (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Case Study as Antidote to the Literal

    Kushner, Saville (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Much programme and policy evaluation yields to the pressure to report on the productivity of programmes and is perforce compliant with the conditions of contract. Too often the view of these evaluations is limited to a literal reading of the analytical challenge. If we are evaluating X we look critically at X1, X2 and X3. There might be cause for embracing adjoining data sources such as W1 and Y1. This ignores frequent realities that an evaluation specification is only an approximate starting point for an unpredictable journey into comprehensive understanding; that the specification represents only that which is wanted by the sponsor, and not all that may be needed; and that the contractual specification too often insists on privileging the questions and concerns of a few. Case study evaluation proves an alternative that allows for the less-than-literal in the form of analysis of contingencies how people, phenomena and events may be related in dynamic ways, how context and action have only a blurred dividing line and how what defines the case as a case may only emerge late in the study.

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  • Using assessment to enhance learning for the Net Generation

    Ovens, AP; Garbett, D; Heap, R (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Assessment has traditionally been seen as a way of finding out what students have learned. There has been a relatively recent shift to embedding assessment as an integral aspect of the learning culture of Net Generation learners. In such a shift, pedagogical encounters are characterised by learners engaging with and connecting to other key agentive elements in ways that combine to create a personalised learning network that extends outwards from each student. In this chapter, we focus on four case studies that enhance learning by viewing assessment as part of the ongoing activity emerging from such pedagogical encounters. Each case study acknowledges that an essential part of working with the Net Generation of learners is having a greater sensitivity to how they make sense of learning activities and enacting forms of assessment that are more student centred, reflective and proactive in enabling students to self-manage their learning activity. This has required numerous changes in our roles as teachers, changes in the role of students, changes in the nature of student–teacher interaction and changes in the relationship between the teacher, the student and the course content. One important insight is that if teachers are to be leading learning in their classrooms, it behoves them to become Net Generation learners themselves. We conclude by suggesting that assessment must be deeply embedded as a part of student learning culture and be evoked in ways that work for the Net Generation of learners.

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  • Beyond shush: Talking to your librarian about teaching for tomorrow today

    Moselen, Christine (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Teaching for tomorrow today in academic libraries is primarily a conversation around information literacy (IL) and lifelong learning; IL is “a prerequisite and essential enabler for lifelong learning” (Bundy, 2004, p.4). But it is not just libraries who are interested in lifelong learning. The New Zealand education system also has a strong interest in lifelong learning as seen in the New Zealand Curriculum whose vision for the future is “young people who will be confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners." (Ministry of Education, 2007, p.7). This paper discusses the broadening concepts of literacy (and information literacy) in schools and universities and the need to develop a culture of continuous learning to meet the perceived needs of the 21st century workplace. It argues that academic libraries, with their focus on learning and teaching, have a critical role to play in the development of such a culture. The paper outlines, in the context of international and local literature, why it is important that teachers of today (and tomorrow) acquire the skills necessary to make them future-proof; it describes what those skills are, and provides examples of the collaboration between academic staff, librarians and learning advisers which have resulted in the integration of academic and information literacy skills into the curriculum.

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  • Sobre a guerra

    Silva, Pedro (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Lawrence Stenhouse and the Refutation of Progressivism in Curriculum

    Kushner, Saville (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Electron Accumulation in InN Thin Films and Nanowires

    Colakerol Arslan, L; Smith, Kevin (2015-12-14)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    An overview on the electron accumulation layer on InN thin film and nanowire surfaces is provided. The interactions between the valence and conduction bands due to the narrow band gap and high electron density at the surface of these materials have a big influence on the electronic structure and the device performance of these materials. We first review the current understanding on the electron accumulation on InN thin films, pointing out the role of defects and dislocations on the unintentional n-type conductivity. Then we carry out detailed investigation on tuning the surface charge properties of InN nanowires depending on the growth process.

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  • Processing Alignments: Semantic, Thematic and Structural Prominence in Samoan SLA

    Charters, Areta; Muagututi’a, G (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    PT proposes two key hypotheses to account for sentence-like structures in early SLA: (i) the Unmarked Alignment Hypothesis says that learners map the most prominent semantic role onto the subject function and the most prominent structural position; (ii) the Topic Hypothesis says that learners do not differentiate subject and topic (Pienemann, DiBiase & Kawaguchi, 2005). This chapter identifies theory-internal problems for these claims, and presents empirical data which shows that they do not hold for Samoan SLA. For theoretical reasons, no NPs produced by early learners can be considered ‘subjects’ and, while initial NPs in early L2 Samoan tend overwhelmingly to be semantically prominent, the converse is not true, initial NPs are not always topical, and semantically prominent NPs may be focal, or background. An account of the observed facts is provided within the framework of LFG without exceeding the procedural capacities accorded to early learners by PT.

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  • Investigating Trade-offs in Sexual Populations with Gene Flow

    Ardern, Zachary; Goddard, Matthew (2015-09-14)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book presents 20 selected contributions to the 18th Evolutionary Biology Meeting, which took place in September 2014 in Marseille.

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  • The Language Situation for the Bosniaks on Both Sides of the Serbian/Montenegrin Border

    Greenberg, Robert (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Controlled Nanomorphology: Conversion of Bulk Polymers into Nano-sized Materials

    Das, Rajarshi; Burbery, Nathaniel; Bhattacharyya, D; Fakirov, S (2015-04)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A high degree of morphological control is necessary to fully exploit the versatility, exceptional mechanical properties, and unique functional properties of polymer nanomaterials that are largely influenced by the very high specific surface area observed in nanoscale structures. However, the utilization of polymeric nanomaterials has been severely limited due to lack of well-understood, consistent manufacturing techniques capable of forming truly nanosized structures. Developments in nanomaterials with controlled nanomorphology have been primarily related to the progression of techniques used for manufacturing and processing nanoparticles and by using new polymers and/or additives. A brief discussion is provided to indicate the key considerations, limitations, and underlying mechanisms of nanoparticle formation, which enable better control of the manufacturing processes. Polymer blends are particularly versatile and could be used to produce controlled porosity, layered or encapsulated geometries, a variety of new surface topologies, and unique mechanical or chemical properties. Nanoweaves and nanofibril-reinforced polymer composites could provide highly tailored geometry, light weight, and good mechanical properties. The commercial future of nanoparticles appears to be promising, with extensive applications in the biomedical, textile, and high-performance materials sectors. This entry will discuss the key polymer nanoparticle manufacturing techniques and research strategies which produce the most significant/current innovations in regard to controlled morphology nanomaterials. This entry will provide current trends in the polymer nanomaterials manufacturing sector, with an aim to enhance the progression of nanomorphological control.

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  • Barefruit Products: A case of entrepreneurial failure in the UK agri-food sector -- United Kingdom

    Swail, Janine (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cope (2011) states that 'failure represents one of the most difficult, complex and yet valuable learning experiences that entrepreneurs will ever have the (mis)fortune to engage in' (p. 620). Thus, venture failure is an important concept to understand in entrepreneurship, both in terms of its causes and consequences for the individual entrepreneur, organisations and society at large. Consequently, the aim of this teaching case is to bring to life, the often untold story of entrepreneurial failure to advance students' understanding of the entrepreneurial learning process.

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  • Teacher networks as professional knowledge communities: Contributions from a Brazilian autonomous community of teacher researchers

    Sanchez-Neto, L; Ovens, Alan; Craig, C (2015-07-15)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New Zealand???s solution focused movement: Development, current practices and future Possibilities

    Thom, Katey (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Automatic landmark detection using statistical shape modelling and template matching

    Baluwala, HY; Malcolm, DTK; Jor, JWY; Nielsen, Poul; Nash, Martyn (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    We propose a new methodology for automated landmark detection for breast MR images that combines statistical shape modelling and template matching into a single framework. The method trains a statistical shape model (SSM) of breast skin surface using 30 manually labelled landmarks, followed by generation of template patches for each landmark. Template patches are matched across the unseen image to produce correlation maps. Correlation maps of the landmarks and the shape model are used to generate a first estimate of the landmarks referred to as shape predicted landmarks. These landmarks are refined using local maximum search in individual landmarks correlation maps. The algorithm was validated on 30 MR images using a leave-one-out approach. The results reveal that the method is robust and capable of localising landmarks with an error of 3.41-2.10A mm.

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  • Expecting more: Teacher differences as moderators of expectancy effects

    Davies, Christine (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    For five decades, researchers have investigated the teacher expectation phenomenon. Researchers have examined teacher behaviors that portray expectations, student characteristics that influence teachers??? expectations, and how students determine teachers??? expectations. However, most research has aggregated teacher data in examining the mediating factors. This chapter focuses on teacher beliefs as moderating expectation effects. Evidence is presented showing that differences in teacher beliefs result in differing student social and academic outcomes. The results are presented from the first year of a randomized control trial in which intervention teachers were trained in the practices of high expectation teachers, those who have high expectations for all their students.

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  • Identity matters: an ethnography of two non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) struggling for legitimate professional participation

    Zhang, Lawrence; Zhang, Donglan (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Wireless sensor network attacks: an overview and critical analysis with detailed investigation on jamming attack effects

    Tayebi, Arash; Berber, Stevan; Swain, Akshya (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are gaining a lot of attention from researchers due to their massive applications. Network security is one of the important requirements of those applications. This chapter analyses possible network attacks that are essential for researchers to understand while developing robust security countermeasure. In this study, a systematic overview of different kinds of attacks for WSNs has been carried out and a critical analysis of the existing research results is presented. In this chapter, we also observe jamming attack consequence on WNSs in depth by investigating the effect of jamming attack on performance of WSN???s communication using binary spreading sequences. The binary sequences in this chapter are generated according to the IEEE 802.15.4a standard. Mathematical expressions of probability of bit error in a communication channel are derived considering the effects of noise and channel fading. Further, we investigate the effects of using interleaver and deinterleaver on bit error rate (BER) in the case of jamming. Matlab simulation results are presented to confirm the validity of the derived theoretical expressions.

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  • Flexible bronchoscopy in a small child

    Baker, Paul (2015-02-20)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the organization of the book may seem obvious or intuitive, this is the first time a textbook has been developed in this manner.

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  • Altruistic Punishments

    Chaudhuri, Ananish (2015-06)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The first and only encyclopedia to focus on the economic and financial behaviors of consumers, investors, and organizations, including an exploration of how people make good???and bad???economic decisions.

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