131 results for Book item, 2015

  • Bear Images: Human Performativity and Animal Touch in Grizzly Man

    Novero, Cecilia (2015-12)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Animal Life and the Moving Image is the first collection of essays to offer a sustained focus on the relations between screen cultures and non-human animals. The volume brings together some of the most important and influential writers working on the non-human animal's significance for cultures and theories of the moving image. It offers innovative analyses of the representation of animals across a wide range of documentary, fiction, mainstream and avant-garde practices, from early cinema to contemporary user-generated media. Individual chapters consider King Kong, The Birds, The Misfits, The Cove, Grizzly Man and Microcosmos, the work of Sergei Eisenstein, Robert Bresson, Malcolm Le Grice, Peter Greenaway, Carolee Schneemann and Isabella Rossellini, and YouTube stars Christian the lion and Maru the cat.

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  • The potential of queer theorising in early childhood education: Disrupting heteronormativity and practising for inclusion

    Gunn, Alexandra C. (2015)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • The Impact of Therapeutic Jurisprudence on the New Zealand Coronial Jurisdiction

    Moore, Jennifer (2015)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Coroners in New Zealand can make recommendations that may reduce the chances of occurrence of similar deaths in the future. Coronial recommendations can have pro-therapeutic outcomes. The recommendations hold therapeutic promise for bereaved families by refocusing families towards prevention of similar deaths. However, when coroners' recommendations are not implemented, this has counter-therapeutic outcomes for the community who deserve remedial action, and for families who hoped for change. This chapter uses evidence from New Zealand's first empirical study of coroners' recommendations. An empirical approach is taken because therapeutic jurisprudence is concerned with assessing the law's impact on people, and the study of impacts often requires data about people's experiences of legal processes.

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  • Marketing ethics in context: the promotion of unhealthy foods and beverages to children

    Jackson, M; Harrison, P; Swinburn, Boyd; Lawrence, M (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Marketing ethics has been described as an inherently relative concept whereby ethical problems and consequences result from interactions between individuals, but are also shaped by the context in which they occur (Chonko and Hunt 1985; Singhapakdi et al. 1996). In making ethical decisions, marketers are influenced by a complex interplay of factors in the broader cultural, economic and organizational environments (Singhapakdi et al. 1996). Within this field, issues arise from organizations’ marketing activities and their consequences (Chonko and Hunt 1985), and the way marketing decisions are shaped by moral standards (Murphy et al. 2005). During the past two decades the marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages, that is, energy-dense, nutrient-poor products such as confectionery and sugar-sweetened beverages, to children and adolescents has been a source of debate among marketers (‘Marketers regroup on junk food marketing’ 2006; Witkowski 2007; Chandon and Wansink 2010), the food and beverage industry (Australian Food and Grocery Council 2010; Cooper 2010; Jolly 2011) and public health professionals (Lobstein and Dibb 2005; Hastings et al. 2006; McGinnis et al. 2006; Palmer and Carpenter 2006; Matthews 2008; Harris et al. 2009c; Mehta et al. 2010). As public health professionals have argued, it is not only the promotional method that is in question but the products being marketed, of which only minimal consumption is recommended (Harris et al. 2009b). Other factors, such as to whom they are being marketed, by whom and for what purpose, add further complexity to this issue.

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  • The Prince Is the Patient: A Shakespearean Tragi-Fantasy of Total Institutional Care

    Bray, Peter (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this chapter William Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet is reconceived as an allegory of one patient’s countervailing experiences of the total institution. Purposely confined in the secure environment of Denmark’s Elsinore Castle his step-father and institutional senior consultant Claudius unethically, and yet largely successfully, transforms the public perception of Hamlet’s mourning and melancholia over his father into psychoneurosis and violent insanity - his identity from princely protégé to mortified patient. However, Hamlet, whilst appearing to fulfil his diagnosis, actively engages in creative ways to find evidence that will prove that Claudius is his father’s murderer. Nevertheless, the patient’s increasing reluctance to see the world as the state institution sanctions it, gives the powers-that-be even more cause to treat his challenges as a threat to its integrity. Shakespeare’s play exposes the sickness of systems that vest power in a single individual and Hamlet’s case illustrates how unitary approaches to patient care disenfranchise the client whilst tragically disabling the expert service relational. The latter also illustrates how complicated mourning can be experienced as a difficult personal process of intra-psychic transformation. In addition, by playing out the tragic consequences of withholding or intentionally ignoring the real source of a patient’s disease, Hamlet’s case exemplifies the outcomes of labelling, casual diagnoses and inappropriate treatment. Threatened, rendered incompetent, and denied a say in his own healing process, Hamlet’s institutionally inconvenient condition provides him with opportunities for the kind of unsupervised self-analysis and experimentation that ultimately risks his life and those of the community. Hamlet reminds us that when distinctions between the roles of the patient and doctor become blurred and the institution becomes either overly self-protective of itself or focused upon its own projects rather those it serves, its judgement and capacity to ensure that its work is undertaken ethically and sympathetically becomes sadly diminished. Key Words: Doctor-patient relationship, Elizabethan, Erving Goffman, madness, psychoanalysis, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, total institution, tragedy, transpersonal, treatment.

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  • Post-Crises Opportunities: A Personal Account of Bereavement and Growth

    Bray, Peter (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    From the moment that they occur crisis events involving personal loss can disrupt people’s lives and irrevocably change how they engage with the world. Living with the crisis of loss in a world that has suddenly become unfamiliar and unpredictable is both existentially and psychologically challenging. In the aftermath of crisis how do survivors go about relearning existence and incorporating the inconceivable into a newly emerging view of the world? In Western society it is quite common for individuals and groups to report that their experiences of powerfully disturbing crisis events have created a set of conditions that forced them to make significant personal changes and resulted in beneficial growth. Thus, in situations perceived of as crises survivors, oscillating between emotional distress and fuller knowledge of reality, might question their core beliefs and goals and establish new ones, whilst simultaneously re-writing and integrating their life narratives in order to maintain psychic and physical balance. This oscillation gently accommodates the pre-crisis elements of survivor’s whole experience and enables the possibility of movement toward continuing future growth and the recognition and use of opportunities. In the last decade or so, mirroring the trend to positively reframe these disrupting states, crisis and bereavement work have become increasingly interested in outcomes that suggest: enhanced psychological well-being and health; personal and spiritual development and increased coping skills; and, improved relationships and enhanced personal resources. This chapter provides an autobiographical account of loss to demonstrate how exposure to crisis can provide opportunities for significant personal transformation. The analysis integrates the conceptual frameworks of Lawrence Calhoun and Richard Tedeschi’s post-traumatic growth model and Stanislav and Christina Grof’s psycho-spiritual, or ‘holotropic’, paradigm, blended with some current ideas about crisis, grief, and bereavement.

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  • The Fountain of Fish: Ontological Collisions at Sea

    Salmond, Mary (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Dal Monte Ventoso a Point Lenana: la sfida di Wu Ming al postmoderno

    Manai, Franco (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Commercial decisions in the Supreme Court of New Zealand: The prominence of agency law in the first ten years

    Watts, Peter (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • How does Water Sensitive Design compare with old approaches

    van Roon, Marjorie (2015-04-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Promoting health equity

    Reid, Mary-Jane (2015-08-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    To many of us who work in health, health promotion and health equity are natural travelling companions. What could be more closely aligned than the community development and advocacy intentions of health promotion, and the social justice focus of health equity? In our work, however, we are surrounded by numerous examples where, despite our best intentions, health promotion interventions have widened health inequities. In this chapter we look closely at the relationship between health promotion and health equity. Many people reading this book will be more familiar with health promotion than health equity, and so relatively more of this chapter is spent defining, understanding and contextualising health equity. Following this introduction, we examine the challenge of undertaking health promotion while keeping health equity firmly in mind, using examples from important health promotion challenges that have been the focus of our attention during the last decades. We review how health promotion can impact health equity unintentionally and negatively, and formulate a plan for assessing health promotion activities against health equity standards. Finally, we note the changing political landscape for both health equity and health promotion, and reflect on what this means for the way we practise health promotion into the future.

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  • Experiment-to-causation inference: Understanding causality in a probabilistic setting

    Pfannkuch, Maxine; Budgett, Stephanie; Arnold, Phillipa (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research on students’ understanding of experiment-to-causation inference is limited despite the randomized experiment being prevalent in high school and introductory statistics courses. Using design research we: Determined conceptual foundations, created a two-lesson learning trajectory incorporating dynamic visualization software for the randomization test, implemented the trajectory in large introductory statistics classes (n ⇡ 450) and a workplace class, and analyzed student data from pretests and posttests and interviews to ascertain their reasoning processes in order to inform future teaching and learning approaches. In this chapter we have mainly focused on six students to explore their reasoning processes as they moved from the observed data and randomization test to making an experiment-to-causation inference. Our findings suggested that the dynamic visualization software assisted students to recall and understand the processes underpinning the randomization test. Student inference argumentation, however, needed further development.

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  • Tax Law

    Cassidy, Julie (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Communication Skills in Social Work

    Staniforth, Barbara (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ability to communicate well with people forms the basis of all social work practice. Being aware of how different cultures communicate is essential in an increasingly global practice environment. Self-awareness is also critical so that social workers can be aware of how they and others filter incoming messages and make meaning. There are certain microskills that form part of a social worker's communication repertoire. These include attending and responding, reflecting thoughts and feelings, asking questions, summarizing and using silence. Social workers need to consider the specific contexts that communication skills occur within and equip themselves for all situations.

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  • Case Study as Antidote to the Literal

    Kushner, Saville (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Much programme and policy evaluation yields to the pressure to report on the productivity of programmes and is perforce compliant with the conditions of contract. Too often the view of these evaluations is limited to a literal reading of the analytical challenge. If we are evaluating X we look critically at X1, X2 and X3. There might be cause for embracing adjoining data sources such as W1 and Y1. This ignores frequent realities that an evaluation specification is only an approximate starting point for an unpredictable journey into comprehensive understanding; that the specification represents only that which is wanted by the sponsor, and not all that may be needed; and that the contractual specification too often insists on privileging the questions and concerns of a few. Case study evaluation proves an alternative that allows for the less-than-literal in the form of analysis of contingencies how people, phenomena and events may be related in dynamic ways, how context and action have only a blurred dividing line and how what defines the case as a case may only emerge late in the study.

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  • Using assessment to enhance learning for the Net Generation

    Ovens, AP; Garbett, D; Heap, R (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Assessment has traditionally been seen as a way of finding out what students have learned. There has been a relatively recent shift to embedding assessment as an integral aspect of the learning culture of Net Generation learners. In such a shift, pedagogical encounters are characterised by learners engaging with and connecting to other key agentive elements in ways that combine to create a personalised learning network that extends outwards from each student. In this chapter, we focus on four case studies that enhance learning by viewing assessment as part of the ongoing activity emerging from such pedagogical encounters. Each case study acknowledges that an essential part of working with the Net Generation of learners is having a greater sensitivity to how they make sense of learning activities and enacting forms of assessment that are more student centred, reflective and proactive in enabling students to self-manage their learning activity. This has required numerous changes in our roles as teachers, changes in the role of students, changes in the nature of student–teacher interaction and changes in the relationship between the teacher, the student and the course content. One important insight is that if teachers are to be leading learning in their classrooms, it behoves them to become Net Generation learners themselves. We conclude by suggesting that assessment must be deeply embedded as a part of student learning culture and be evoked in ways that work for the Net Generation of learners.

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  • Ethics of Predictive Risk Modelling

    Dare, Tim (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The early and accurate assessment of the likelihood that a child will be the victim of maltreatment in the future promises obvious benefits. Recent research suggests that predictive risk models – automated tools that gather and process information held in existing data sets in order to determine patterns and predict future outcomes – go at least some way toward making such assessments possible. However the application of predictive risk modelling to child maltreatment brings ethical risks and costs, including the possible stigmatisation of already vulnerable populations, predictable false positives, the use of data without consent, difficulties in designing and implementing effective interventions, and resource allocation issues. Not surprisingly predictive tools have been treated with suspicion in the child welfare area.1 This paper takes a predictive risk model developed in New Zealand as its focus and attempts to identify and respond to at least some of the ethical risks associated with the use of PRM in child protection, suggesting that the ethical costs associated with such modelling can be addressed or ameliorated or are outweighed by its potential benefits.

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  • Beyond shush: Talking to your librarian about teaching for tomorrow today

    Moselen, Christine (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Teaching for tomorrow today in academic libraries is primarily a conversation around information literacy (IL) and lifelong learning; IL is “a prerequisite and essential enabler for lifelong learning” (Bundy, 2004, p.4). But it is not just libraries who are interested in lifelong learning. The New Zealand education system also has a strong interest in lifelong learning as seen in the New Zealand Curriculum whose vision for the future is “young people who will be confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners." (Ministry of Education, 2007, p.7). This paper discusses the broadening concepts of literacy (and information literacy) in schools and universities and the need to develop a culture of continuous learning to meet the perceived needs of the 21st century workplace. It argues that academic libraries, with their focus on learning and teaching, have a critical role to play in the development of such a culture. The paper outlines, in the context of international and local literature, why it is important that teachers of today (and tomorrow) acquire the skills necessary to make them future-proof; it describes what those skills are, and provides examples of the collaboration between academic staff, librarians and learning advisers which have resulted in the integration of academic and information literacy skills into the curriculum.

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  • United Kingdom

    Bowler Smith, Mark (2015-06)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New Zealand National Report: Tax Incentives on Research and Development

    Bowler Smith, Mark (2015-04-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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