137 results for Book item, 2016

  • Multi-GNSS positioning

    Odolinski, Robert; Khodabandeh, Amir (2016)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Full text available through link only

    View record details
  • Compulsory community mental health care. Oceania

    O'Brien, Anthony (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Some key issues in post-admission language assessment

    Read, John (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter introduces the volume by briefly outlining trends in English-medium higher education internationally, but with particular reference to post-entry language assessment (PELA) in Australian universities. The key features of a PELA are described, in contrast to a placement test and an international proficiency test. There is an overview of each of the other chapters in the book, providing appropriate background information on the societies and education systems represented: Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the USA, New Zealand, Oman and South Africa. This is followed by a discussion of three themes running through several chapters. The first is how to validate post-admission language assessments; the second is the desirability of obtaining feedback from the test-takers; and the third is the extent to which a PELA is diagnostic in nature.

    View record details
  • Reflecting on the contribution of post-admission assessments

    Read, John (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter examines a number of issues arising from the earlier contributions to this volume. It considers the decision by a university about whether to introduce a post-admission language assessment in terms of the positive and negative messages such a decision may convey, as well as the costs versus the benefits. There is some discussion of the need to develop professional communication skills as attributes to enhance the employability of graduates and how such skills can be fostered, along with the development of academic literacy in the disciplines, through various forms of collaboration between English language specialists and academic teaching staff. Finally, it explores ideas related to the concept of English as a lingua franca and what implications they may have for the assessment of university students from different language backgrounds.

    View record details
  • Deviance Information Criterion (DIC)

    Meyer, Renate (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The deviance information criterion (DIC) was introduced in 2002 by Spiegelhalter et al. [1] to compare the relative t of a set of hierarchical Bayesian models. It is similar to Akaike's information criterion (AIC) in combining a measure of goodness-of- t and measure of complexity, both based on the deviance. While AIC uses the maximum likelhood estimate, DIC's plug-in estimate is based on the posterior mean. Since the number of independent parameters in a Bayesian hierarchical model is not clearly de ned, DIC estimates the e ective number of parameters by the di erence of the posterior mean of the deviance and the deviance at the posterior mean. This coincides with the number of independent parameters in xed e ect models with at priors, thus the DIC is a generalization of AIC. It can be justi ed as an estimate of the posterior predictive model performance within a decision-theoretic framework and it is asymptotically equivalent to leave-one-out cross- validation. The DIC has been used extensively for practical model comparison in many disciplines, works well for exponential family models but due to its dependence on the parametrization and focus of a model, its application to mixture models is problematic.

    View record details
  • Developing students’ cognitive / academic language proficiency: genre and metacognition in interaction

    Zhang, Lawrence (2016-12-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Learning English as a foreign language (EFL) is not as easy as what is usually understood. Developing advanced proficiency in English, especially cognitive/academic language proficiency (CALP), is even more challenging. Generally speaking, cognitive/academic English is different from how English is used in daily situations in many ways, some of which are typically reflected in its lexical richness, syntactic complexity, and other subject or topic-specific features, among other things. Understandably, writing in EFL is a demanding task, and the degree of difficulty exacerbated when EFL students have to write in academic English (Zhang, 2013). Oftentimes, scholars have tended to associate the difficulty mentioned above only with students’ cognitive ability, without having taken into full consideration many sociocultural factors. More importantly, the value of teacher scaffolding in the learning process has not been given the credit that it deserves. In this paper, I attempt to highlight the role of the teacher in enhancing learner genre awareness and metacognition and the interaction between learner genre awareness and metacognition for developing EFL students toward high levels of academic English ability. Specifically, I maintain that provision of learning strategies guided by metacognitive instruction coupled with genre-sensitizing and enhancement will offer students opportunities to experience success because of their teachers scaffolding their learning of various language skills for possible language output (speaking, listening, reading, writing, vocabulary, and grammar). I conclude that such a pedagogical approach of creating opportunities for genre and metacognition to interact in students’ learning processes needs to be brought to the fore for maximizing their capacity for developing high levels of cognitive/academic English proficiency. Keywords: metacognition, metacognitive-scaffolding, genre awareness, cognitive/academic language learning, strategy-based instruction

    View record details
  • In the shadow of written history: An exploration of the Tehran bazaar as a non-place

    Haghighi, Farzaneh (2016-01-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    To answer the simple question ‘what is the Tehran bazaar?’, one will fall into an architectural and socio-political labyrinth of historical classifications, definitions and descriptions based on travellers’ accounts, map productions, the monarchies’ role in shaping cities, revolutions, theories of city evolution, the Iranian versus Islamic city controversies, archaeological approaches to civilisation and even linguistic approaches to Persian roots of the word ‘bazaar’. The commonly accepted definition is that the Tehran bazaar is a linearly structured marketplace, and a united socio-cultural entity consisting of several public buildings of varying forms, functions, and historical values. This labyrinthine approach firstly ignores the transformative nature of the bazaar and presents it as a still, immobile and silent complex of static places; and secondly leaves little room to investigate the plurality of events and multiplicity of meanings taking place perpetually in this market place. This chapter utilises concepts of ‘anthropological place’ and ‘non-place’ by the French anthropologist, Marc Augé, in order to open new possibilities of looking at the multivalent context of the Tehran bazaar. It aims to go beyond the conventional understanding, to present an insight to a marketplace, problematising any enduring meaning.

    View record details
  • Character and Character Swapping in Mozart's Così fan tutte

    Davies, Stephen (2016-12-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter on Mozart’s opera Così fan tutte (“Thus Do They All”) offers a discussion of a number of topics covered by other chapters—the portrayal of fictional characters, mixed motivation, promise keeping, the influence of character, and situational variables, respectively, in determining behavior and individual differences among people. Così’s libretto is about two couples who swap partners. Così is typically seen as a character-swapping farce, with one-dimensional characters. The chapter quotes Peter Kivy, according to whom the heroes and heroines are not even real characters—rather, they are voices: the soprano, the mezzo-soprano, the heroic tenor, and so on. The chapter, however, makes a compelling case that this is not so. The opera has a moral seriousness often overlooked by interpreters due to lack of attention to the individual differences among the characters and to character development.

    View record details
  • The ocean swim: Rethinking community in an early childhood education performing arts research initiative

    Lines, David (2016-05-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter describes a community research project called MAPS Move, Act, Play, Sing), which involved community artists in music, dance and drama working with three early childhood education centres in Auckland, New Zealand. The MAPS project developed a programme that focused on stimulating and encouraging performing arts teaching and learning through a community- inspired, practice-based research approach. The pedagogy enabled the three early childhood centres with different cultural dispositions to respond to arts provocations from community artists and develop their own cultural focal points, decisions and directions. This chapter describes the project’s aims and philosophy of practice and discusses how they can be viewed as alternatives to individualistic approaches to performing arts teaching and learning. A working metaphor of the ‘ocean swimmer’ provides a backdrop for rethinking community in performing arts learning in this context.

    View record details
  • Introduction

    Lines, David; Ashley, L (2016-05-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Intersecting Cultures in Music and Dance Education: An Oceanic Perspective explores the interface of Oceanic cultures through the diversity, richness and critical differences encountered in their performing arts, educational paradigms and cultural worldviews. In this introductory chapter, the editors reflect on aspects of their personal histories that inform their thinking in the book. This is followed by an editorial discussion that outlines theoretical and practical contexts informing key concepts in the book including notions of culture and cultural diversity, ethnicity, identity, hybridity, indigeneity, colonialism, migrancy, multiculturalism, tradition, cultural interaction and difference.

    View record details
  • Monitoring for Surveillance and Management

    Suckling, David (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The identification of pheromones of many economically important moth pests has revolutionized their management. Pheromone-baited traps have been used in a wide variety of ways for pest management, including seasonal phenology, population estimation, and decision support, as well as early detection and delimitation of invasive species. All sectors affected by moth pests have benefited from these technologies. Moth sex pheromone traps are now widely deployed, and have contributed significantly to sustainable pest management. New developments, including lures and traps for additional species, the use of pheromones in the biological control of weeds, and self-reporting camera traps linked with geographical information systems are providing exciting opportunities for the expansion of the use of pheromones for surveillance and monitoring of pest populations, as well as detection and delimitation of new invaders.

    View record details
  • Advances in Heat Pump-Assisted Agro-food Drying Technologies

    Perera, Conrad (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Live Farm Animal Exports

    Dare, Tim (2016-07-25)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Assessment and parents

    Harris, LR; Brown, Gavin (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Expatriate selection: A historical overview and criteria for decision-making

    Ott, Dana; Michailova, Snejina (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose: The International Human Resource Management literature has paid less attention to the selection of expatriates and the decision-making criteria with regard to such selection, than to issues relating to expatriates' role, performance, adjustment, success, and failure. Yet, before expatriates commence their assignments, they need to be selected. The purpose of this book chapter is to provide an overview of issues related specifically to expatriate selection. In particular, the chapter traces the chronological development of selection over the last five decades or so, from prior to 1970 until present. The chapter subsequently identifies five expatriate selection criteria that have been applied in regard to traditional international assignments, but are also relevant to alternative assignments. Methodology/approach: We begin by reviewing expatriate selection historically and its position within expatriate management based on changing business environments. Then, drawing from over five decades of literature on international assignments, we identify and discuss five organizational, individual, and contextual level criteria for selecting expatriates. Findings: Emphasis on different issues tends to characterize expatriate selection during the various decades since the literature has taken up the topic. The chapter describes those issues, following a chronological perspective. In addition, the chapter organizes the various selection criteria in five clusters: organization philosophy, technical competence, relational abilities, personal characteristics, and spouse and family situation. Research limitations and practical implications: While there are studies on expatriate selection, there is more to be understood with regard to the topic. Provided all other expatriation phases are subsequent, if selection is not understood in detail, the foundations of studying phases and processes that take place once expatriates are selected may not be sound. While the scholarly conversations of other expatriate-related issues should continue, the international human resource management literature can absorb more analyses on selection. A better understanding of expatriate selection will assist its better management. The chapter provides a basis for human resource management professionals to be able to map the various criteria for selection, and decide, under particular circumstances, which ones to prioritize and why. Originality/value: The chapter brings clarity to a topic that has remained less researched when compared to other areas of interest related to expatriates and their international assignments by tracing the historical development of this important phase of the expatriation process. In addition, the chapter organizes a number of selection criteria along five core areas and discusses each of them to gain insights that help explain expatriate selection in greater detail.

    View record details
  • Postcolonial security, development and biopolitics: targeting women’s lives in Solomon Islands

    Lacey, Anita (2016-01-28)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • What can reverse mentoring models contribute to communities of practice involving developed and rising economies?

    Dunham, Annette; Ross, M (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Communities of practice have been proposed as effective means of building cooperative knowledge sharing relationships between locals and experts from emerging and developed economies (including divisions within some multinational companies). Mentoring relationships in general have been found to support the work of communities of practice. Reverse mentoring relationships are the reverse to what is traditionally expected of a mentoring relationship; they involve the mentoring of a mature or more experienced employee by a younger or generally less experienced employee, but also have the potential to offer much to communities of practice. In the context of communities of practice involving developed and emerging economies, reverse mentoring relationships have the potential to facilitate nationals' (the reverse mentors) sharing of local knowledge while at the same time providing them with leadership development courtesy of the developed country's representative(s) (the reverse mentee(s)), a winning solution for communities of practice and multinational companies. This chapter outlines the benefits of reverse mentoring relationships for communities of practice, and identifies some potential challenges for these partnerships. The implications of these for managers and practitioners are outlined. An agenda for research into reverse mentoring arrangements will complete this chapter. The aim of the chapter is to show how reverse mentoring relationships can complement the work of communities of practice in fostering co-operative knowledge sharing between those in developed and emerging economies.

    View record details
  • A dynamic metacognitive systems perspective on language learner autonomy

    Zhang, Lawrence (2016-02-08)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Afterword.

    View record details
  • Demography and Epidemiology of Ageing in New Zealand

    Broad, Joanna (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • The baneful hedgehog of ancient Greece

    Mackay, Elizabeth (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details