157 results for Book item, 2016

  • Directors as Agents–Some Aspects of Disputed Territory

    Watts, Peter (2016-01-28)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The main question addressed in this chapter is whether, in relation to the operation of general private law, company directors are agents. The chapter then turns to some more specific aspects of the application of private law questions to directors.

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  • Exploring Customer Engagement: a multi-stakeholder perspective

    Hollebeek, Linda (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Living Life at the Edge: Democracy, Equity and Pragmatics in Evaluation

    Kushner, Saville (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The chapter explores the politics and the role of program and policy evaluation in contexts of social inequity. A contrast is drawn between the roles and the goals of three key approaches to evaluation: Democratic Evaluation, Deliberative Democratic Evaluation and Equity-Based Evaluation.

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  • Advances in Heat Pump-Assisted Agro-food Drying Technologies

    Perera, Conrad (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Rheumatoid Arthritis and Spondyloarthritis

    White, Douglas; Kocijan, R (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recent years have seen extraordinary growth in our knowledge and understanding of the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis as reflected in the development of new therapies and changing clinical practice. This chapter will review the most common forms of inflammatory arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, the axial spondyloarthritides (radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (r-axSpA) and the non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA)) as well as psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to explore their epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and treatment.

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  • Alternative Origins for Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Diet

    Lenihan-Geels, G; Bishop, Karen (2016-10-04)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This volume argues for the importance of essential nutrients in our diet. Over the last two decades there has been an explosion of research on the relationship of Omega-3 fatty acids and the importance of antioxidants to human health.

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  • ???Since Feeling Is First???: Poetry and Research Supervision

    Fitzpatrick, Esther; Fitzpatrick, Katrina (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Building Conceptual Understanding of Probability Models: Visualizing Chance

    Budgett, Stephanie; Pfannkuch, Maxine; Franklin, C (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Improvement and accountability functions of assessment: Impact on teachers' thinking and action

    Brown, Gavin (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Vision for our Children???s Education: Navigating Tensions between Mothers and Scholars

    Farquhar, Sandra; Fitzpatrick, Esther; Le Fevre, D (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Hermeneutics in organization studies

    Myers, Michael (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Hermeneutics is primarily concerned with human understanding: how it is possible for us to understand the meaning of a text. The word ???text??? is interpreted broadly in contemporary hermeneutics and refers to written text, speech and any kind of human communication (which may be non-verbal). Hermeneutics can be described as both an underlying philosophy and as a specific way of analysing qualitative data (Bleicher, 1980). As a philosophical approach to human understanding, it provides one of the philosophical groundings for interpretivism (Klein and Myers, 1999). As a mode of analysis, it provides a set of concepts for analysing qualitative data in qualitative research projects.

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  • High and low expectation teachers: The importance of the teacher factor

    Davies, Christine (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Deviance Information Criterion (DIC)

    Meyer, Renate (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The deviance information criterion (DIC) was introduced in 2002 by Spiegelhalter et al. [1] to compare the relative t of a set of hierarchical Bayesian models. It is similar to Akaike's information criterion (AIC) in combining a measure of goodness-of- t and measure of complexity, both based on the deviance. While AIC uses the maximum likelhood estimate, DIC's plug-in estimate is based on the posterior mean. Since the number of independent parameters in a Bayesian hierarchical model is not clearly de ned, DIC estimates the e ective number of parameters by the di erence of the posterior mean of the deviance and the deviance at the posterior mean. This coincides with the number of independent parameters in xed e ect models with at priors, thus the DIC is a generalization of AIC. It can be justi ed as an estimate of the posterior predictive model performance within a decision-theoretic framework and it is asymptotically equivalent to leave-one-out cross- validation. The DIC has been used extensively for practical model comparison in many disciplines, works well for exponential family models but due to its dependence on the parametrization and focus of a model, its application to mixture models is problematic.

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  • Developing students??? cognitive / academic language proficiency: genre and metacognition in interaction

    Zhang, Lawrence (2016-12-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Learning English as a foreign language (EFL) is not as easy as what is usually understood. Developing advanced proficiency in English, especially cognitive/academic language proficiency (CALP), is even more challenging. Generally speaking, cognitive/academic English is different from how English is used in daily situations in many ways, some of which are typically reflected in its lexical richness, syntactic complexity, and other subject or topic-specific features, among other things. Understandably, writing in EFL is a demanding task, and the degree of difficulty exacerbated when EFL students have to write in academic English (Zhang, 2013). Oftentimes, scholars have tended to associate the difficulty mentioned above only with students??? cognitive ability, without having taken into full consideration many sociocultural factors. More importantly, the value of teacher scaffolding in the learning process has not been given the credit that it deserves. In this paper, I attempt to highlight the role of the teacher in enhancing learner genre awareness and metacognition and the interaction between learner genre awareness and metacognition for developing EFL students toward high levels of academic English ability. Specifically, I maintain that provision of learning strategies guided by metacognitive instruction coupled with genre-sensitizing and enhancement will offer students opportunities to experience success because of their teachers scaffolding their learning of various language skills for possible language output (speaking, listening, reading, writing, vocabulary, and grammar). I conclude that such a pedagogical approach of creating opportunities for genre and metacognition to interact in students??? learning processes needs to be brought to the fore for maximizing their capacity for developing high levels of cognitive/academic English proficiency. Keywords: metacognition, metacognitive-scaffolding, genre awareness, cognitive/academic language learning, strategy-based instruction

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  • The ocean swim: Rethinking community in an early childhood education performing arts research initiative

    Lines, David (2016-05-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter describes a community research project called MAPS Move, Act, Play, Sing), which involved community artists in music, dance and drama working with three early childhood education centres in Auckland, New Zealand. The MAPS project developed a programme that focused on stimulating and encouraging performing arts teaching and learning through a community- inspired, practice-based research approach. The pedagogy enabled the three early childhood centres with different cultural dispositions to respond to arts provocations from community artists and develop their own cultural focal points, decisions and directions. This chapter describes the project???s aims and philosophy of practice and discusses how they can be viewed as alternatives to individualistic approaches to performing arts teaching and learning. A working metaphor of the ???ocean swimmer??? provides a backdrop for rethinking community in performing arts learning in this context.

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  • Model-Based Interpretation of Skin Microstructural and Mechanical Measurements

    Jor, JWY; Parker, MD; Nash, MP; Taberner, Andrew; Nielsen, PMF (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Accurate characterization of skin mechanics requires model-based interpretation of skin mechanical and structural measurements. Due to difficulties in measuring properties of in vivo skin, research efforts have focused largely on the characterization of in vitro skin. In this chapter, we review state-of-the-art constitutive models, with particular focus on structural models that can provide valuable insights into the relationship between tissue microstructure and mechanical response of skin. Constitutive parameter estimation remains a challenge and relies on the availability of a comprehensive range of deformation measurements of skin under various loading conditions. We provide a summary of current imaging techniques to visualize and quantify skin microstructure (such as collagen fiber organization) and instrumentation used for measuring the mechanical response of the skin. To enhance our understanding of skin mechanics, future research effort should focus on the integration of noninvasive in vivo imaging modalities, mechanical testing, and computational modeling.

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  • Molecular methods for the assessment of microbial biofilms in bioremediation

    Lear, Gavin (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Advances in molecular methods are providing new insights into the diversity and organisation of biofilm microbial communities as well as the genetic basis of biofilm-mediated contaminant degradation. In the first part of this chapter, we consider the various methods available to inform on the taxonomic and genetic composition of microbial biofilms and to visualise the location of microorganisms genes within complex biofilm communities. Methods directed towards the analysis of functional subsets of these communities, including contaminant degraders are also described. The advantages and disadvantages of a variety of contemporary DNA fingerprinting and sequencing methodologies are each considered. In the second part of this chapter, case studies focusing on the use of molecular techniques in bioremediation assessments are presented. We highlight how the labelling of bacterial taxa with gene specific probes can reveal the complex structural organisation of natural biofilms as well as the impact of pollutants on their composition and organisation. Finally, we detail how the DNA of contaminant-degrading bacteria can be isolated to identify even low abundances of pollutant degrading taxa within diverse and active biofilm communities. The research opportunities provided by modern molecular methods continue to rapidly advance our understanding, and application of, biofilms in bioremediation.

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  • Miniature pump with ionic polymer metal composite actuator for drug delivery

    Wang, J; McDaid, Andrew; Sharma, Rajnish; Yu, W; Aw, Kean (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Miniature pumps are the key components in microfluidic systems. They are widely used in many applications such as lab-on-chip, micro-total analysis systems and micro-dosage systems. The most important component in a miniature pump is the actuating mechanism because it is directly related to factors such as flow rate, driving source and cost. Currently, the most common driving mechanisms are piezoelectric, electromagnetic, thermo-pneumatic and electrostatic. They all have their own advantages and disadvantages. The main advantages of using ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) as the actuating mechanisms are that they have large displacements at low voltages, which will correspond to large flow rates, making them good for long lifespans in portable and embedded applications. Here, we demonstrate a miniature pump actuated by an IPMC controlled using a proportional-integral-derivative controller with iterative feedback tuning. This chapter also shows the design, modelling and simulation of a valveless pump using a diffuser/nozzle structure.

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  • Forging genuine partnerships in the music studio context: Reviving the master-apprentice model for post-colonial times

    Rakena, Te Oti (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter discusses the relationship between the music teacher and the music learner in the vocal and instrumental studio context. The discussion is specific to Aotearoa/New Zealand and is framed within a narrative that describes the creation and implementation of a postgraduate studio pedagogy course. Creating a culturally safe and psychologically safe studio context is increasingly complicated in this post-colonial context. The course was designed to support performance students planning to teach in the community by enhancing their knowledge of studio teaching practices with contemporary studio based research relevant to the South Pacific context. The aim of the course was to produce future teachers who think both as music instructors and as critical cultural workers and in this way mitigate the possibilities of mis-learning and resistance in future studio teaching and learning partnerships.

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  • Who are the elderly who want to end their lives?

    Cheung, G; Sundram, Frederick (2016-11-29)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book provides a comprehensive view of rational suicide in the elderly, a group that has nearly twice the rate of suicide when chronically ill than any other demographic.

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