1,850 results for Book item

  • Kant, Skepticism, and the Comparison Argument

    Vanzo, Alberto (2010)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Kant's writings on logic illustrate the comparison argument about truth, which goes as follows. A truth-bearer p is true if and only if it corresponds, or it agrees, with a portion of reality: the object(s), state(s) of affairs, or event(s) p is about. In order to know whether p agrees with that portion of reality, one must check if that portion of reality is as p states. Using the terms of the comparison argument, one must compare p with that portion of reality. This is impossible, because the only knowledge of reality we can have is in the form propositions, beliefs, or judgments, whose agreement with reality is as much in need of justification as the agreement of p with reality. Therefore, it is impossible to know which truth-bearers are true. In this paper, I reconstruct Kant's version of the comparison argument. I argue that, for Kant, the argument is sound only under the assumption of transcendental realism. Transcendental idealism avoids the sceptical consequences of the comparison argument.

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  • Credit Union Otago: Prospering in a competitive environment

    Sibbald, Alexander (2002)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    This case study presents an opportunity to identify and discuss operational management stratagies pursued by Credit Union Otago in particular, and the credit union industry in general, in their bid to survive and grow whilst aiming to achieve both economic and social objectives.

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  • The digitisation of New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture

    Stanger, Nigel (2010-09-15)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Over the last 25 years, it has become possible to digitise and store an ever-increasing amount and variety of material. New Zealand has been one of the leaders in this area, with early initiatives such as the New Zealand Digital Library in the mid 1990s and the more recent Digital Content Strategy (http://www.digitalcontent.govt.nz/) promoting the idea of digitising New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture and making it available online. The government is committed to ensuring “New Zealand will be a world leader in using information and technology to realise its economic, environmental, social and cultural goals” (New Zealand Government, 2005, p. 4). They see New Zealanders as world leaders in using information and technology to build globally connected science and technology research communities. A key benefit of digitising research, cultural and heritage material is improved accessibility. It can be difficult and laborious to find specific items in traditional “hard copy” collections, whereas digital collections can be quickly and easily searched. They can also be made available via the Internet to a much larger audience than was previously possible. Digitisation also removes the access bottleneck arising from there being few physical copies of an item, as many people can access the same digital item simultaneously. Finally, digitisation helps us to preserve fragile historical material by reducing the need for physical access, and hence the likelihood of further physical damage or even loss. The need to store and manage digital collections of this nature has driven the development of digital libraries and repositories of various kinds, including the already mentioned New Zealand Digital Library. More recently, the launch of the government’s Digital Strategy in 2005 resulted in a nationwide proliferation of digital research repositories at New Zealand tertiary institutions, and ultimately led to the development of the Kiwi Research Information Service (KRIS) by the National Library of New Zealand. These developments have made New Zealand’s research readily available to the wider world. The same technologies used to build these institutional research repositories are also now being applied in non-academic areas. In 2006, the Cardrona Online Museum was launched, with the aim of storing and making available heritage materials relating to the Cardrona district. The launch attracted strong interest and has led into an ongoing project to develop a similar repository for the Central Otago region. In parallel, the Horowhenua Library Trust and Katipo Communications, Ltd., developed the Kete software to facilitate online community collaboration, and recently, the National Library began to harvest and index content from New Zealand Web sites for its DigitalNZ project. In this chapter, we will examine these developments, their impact on the dissemination of New Zealand’s research, heritage and culture, and look forward to future developments in this area.

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  • Scalability of techniques for online geographic visualization of Web site hits

    Stanger, Nigel (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Extremely large data sets are now commonplace, and they are often visualized through the World Wide Web. Scalability of web-based visualization techniques is thus a key issue. This paper investigates the scalability of four representative techniques for dynamic map generation and display (e.g., for visualizing geographic sources of web site hits): generating a single composite map image, overlaying images on an underlying base map and two variants of overlaying HTML on a base map. These four techniques embody a mixture of different display technologies and distribution styles (three server-side and one distributed across both client and server). Each technique was applied to 20 synthetic data sets of increasing size, and the data set volume, elapsed time and memory consumption were measured. The results show that all four techniques are suitable for small data sets comprising a few thousand points, but that the two HTML techniques scale to larger data sets very poorly across all three variables.

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  • Rapid biofunctionalization of magnetic beads with function-spacer-lipid constructs

    Henry, SM

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    KODE™ Technology is based on novel water-dispersible self-assembling molecules, called a functionspacer- lipids or KODE™ constructs (Figure 1) that are able to coat virtually any biological or non-biological surface with almost any biological or non-biological material [1-10]. The primary coating method of live cells, organisms, bacteria and viruses or solid surfaces (glass, metals, plastics, etc.) is achieved by simple contact with a solution containing one or more FSL KODE™ constructs. Upon contact the FSLs spontaneously and harmlessly create a stable and novel surface coating. Essentially the spontaneous self-assembling process is driven by the need of the constructs to “exclude water”. Because the constructs are able to bind to virtually any surface, be it hydrophobic or hydrophilic the mechanisms of action are multiple and complex and include hydrophobic interactions (via lipid tail), hydrophilic interactions (via the head group and spacer), micelle entrapment, encapsulation, bi/multi layer assembly, and other factors such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces, electrostatic and ionic interactions and combinations of all the above on complex surfaces. To-date a large range of peptides, simple and complex carbohydrates (including sialic acids and hyaluronin), peptides, fluorescent markers, reactive functional groups, biotin (Figure 1), oligonucleotides,radiolabels, chelators, and other functional moieties have been created as FSL constructs [1-10]. The key advantages of KODE™ Technology over other conjugation techniques are that it allows the user to create bespoke novel surfaces on demand, and it can also harmlessly modify live cells to facilitate their attachment to beads. Because multiple different FSL constructs can be added simultaneously to a bead, and in a controlled manner (by simply altering relative concentrations of FSLs in the mix), users can build on the surface of the bead a variety of complex multi-ligand biofunctional surfaces. Furthermore, the technology is compatible with existing functionalized beads and would allow users to add further features, such as fluorescent labels, or other enhancing or blocking components.

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  • Rodent control and island conservation

    Howald, G.; Ross, James G.; Buckle, A. P.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    The most numerous of the world's invasive species, rodent pests have a devastating impact on agriculture, food, health and the environment. In the last two decades, the science and practice of rodent control has faced new legislation on rodenticides, the pests' increasing resistance to chemical control and the impact on non-target species, bringing a new dimension to this updated 2nd edition and making essential reading for all those involved in rodent pest control, including researchers, conservationists, practitioners and public health specialists.

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  • Targeted screening for microbial bioactivity

    Stewart, Alison; Ohkura, M.; McLean, K.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    High throughput screening technology has allowed significant advances to be made in the discovery of lead agents for use in the pharmaceutical and agrichemical industries. However, economic and practical constraints have limited the use of this technology in the identification of bioactive microbes targeted at crop pests and diseases. Smaller scale targeted screening programmes have generally provided greater success in identifying microbial bioactivity. This paper describes a strategy for targeted selection of bioactive Trichoderma spp. Isolates are selected for biological characteristics that best match the biocontrol blueprint developed for the target pathogen and are then put through a series of standardised bioassays. This strategy provides a rapid and cost-effective means of identifying biocontrol agents with commercial potential.

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  • 'Van tour' and 'Doing a Contiki": grand 'backpacker' tours of Europe

    Wilson, Judith; Fisher, David F.; Moore, Kevin

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    The need to research a wider geographic diversity of destinations and backpacker contexts has been recognised as an area of concern in backpacker studies (Richards & Wilson, 2004b). While a range of studies and market reports have variously addressed the ‘youth’ or the ‘student’ travel market, most have considered Europe as a source of outbound backpacker travellers and not as a destination per se. This chapter addresses backpacker tourism in Europe, an important destination for several reasons: first, Europe is where backpacker tourism originated; and second, European destinations continue to attract many thousands of backpackers. For decades there has been a tradition of young New Zealanders and Australians going to Britain and Europe on extended travel trips. In New Zealand such an experience is called the ‘OE’ (sometimes the ‘Big OE’), a trip of extended duration that usually involves living, working and travelling outside New Zealand for a number of years. Investigation of the OE offers a unique opportunity to trace some of the changes in backpacker travel over time as practised and experienced by a specific group (or nationality) of travellers. With its focus on Europe, an exploration of OE travel also adds to the geographic diversity of destinations studied. To understand the travel behaviour of any group, the contexts within which it occurs historical, temporal, global, social, cultural, institutional, spatial are important. In spite of political, social and institutional changes in tourism over time, OE travellers still follow the same routes and travel patterns they have for decades; yet in many ways their experiences have changed over time. This chapter explores these travel patterns and the changes within them, focusing on two iconic travel experiences of the OE, the ‘van tour’ and ‘doing a Contiki’.

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  • Homogeneity of urban biotopes and similarity of landscape design language in former colonial cities

    Ignatieva, Maria; Stewart, Glenn H.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    Colonial cities have remarkable similarities in their urban biotopes and landscape designs. The similar urban planning principles, landscape architectural styles, urban construction, and planting designs have produced an array of urban habitats that are replicated around the globe. From urban lawns to hedges and vegetation in pavement cracks, compositional similarity in urban biotopes is probably not surprising. But now, new concepts in individual planting design language such as "plant signatures", "go wild" and "alternative" or "freedom lawns" in North America, the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand are producing a new ecological and cultural identity.

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  • Multi-GNSS positioning

    Odolinski, Robert; Khodabandeh, Amir (2016)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Full text available through link only

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  • From chaos towards sense: a learner-centric narrative virtual learning space

    Reiners, T; Wood, L; Dron, J (2013-12-17)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Throughout educational settings there are a range of open-focused learning activities along with those that are much more closed and structured. The plethora of opportunities creates a confusing melee of opportunities for teachers as they attempt to create activities that will engage and motivate learners. In this chapter, we demonstrate a learner-centric narrative virtual learning space, where the unrestricted exploration is combined with mechanisms to monitor the student and provide indirect guidance through elements in the learning space. The instructional designer defines the scope of the story in which the teacher and learner create narratives (a sequence of actions and milestones to complete a given task), which can be compared, assessed, and awarded with badges and scores. The model is described using an example from Logistics; where incoming orders have to be fulfilled by finding the good and delivering it to a given location in a warehouse. Preliminary studies showed that the model is able to engage the learner, create an intrinsic motivation and therewith curiosity to drive the self-paced learning.

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  • Advertising, Public Relations and Social Marketing: shaping behaviour towards sustainable consumption

    Muratovski, G (2013-12-09)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    As the world struggles to sustain mass consumption as a lifestyle of choice, the need for sustainable behaviour becomes increasingly evident. Even though there are already a number of technical and legislative solutions underway, we still need to work on changing our consumption habits. This calls for social marketing strategies that can lead to promotion and acceptance of sustainable behaviour on a global scale. The problem, however, is that social marketing for sustainability that dominates the media today is ineffective and even counterproductive. In this study, I will examine what drives consumerism, and argue that sustainable consumption could be promoted as an alternative lifestyle, based on the same strategies that have successfully established mass consumption as a way of life. Countering the claims made for traditional social marketing, I will suggest that appealing to people’s innermost desires in the same way commercial marketing does, is in fact a more effective means of behaviour change than the negative information campaigns that are prevalent today. This calls for a different type of social marketing—one based on positive appeals related to subjective wellbeing and self-fulfilment, and not on scare tactics and dull educational campaigns.

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  • Maximizing the good and minimizing the bad: relationships in organizations

    Cooper-Thomas, HD; Morrison, R (2013-11-28)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this chapter we introduce the complexities of relationships in organizations, and outline why they are important to study. We discuss the main themes of this book providing a brief overview of the chapters and making links between them. The chapters canvas a wide range of organizational relationships, both positive and fruitful, and dysfunctional and damaging.

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  • Love of teaching: reflections of what it means to be an effective Pasifika ECE lecturer

    Utumapu-McBride, T (2013-12-03)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper is based on my reflections of an effective Pasifika Early Childhood Education (ECE) lecturer (as a result of my own personal journey and insights, e.g. my career change from that of a Learning Development Lecturer) and also through a literature review. The Auckland University of Technology's (AUT) academic promotion evaluations clearly stipulates in the criteria the characteristics of an effective lecturer as being someone who is approachable; organised and well prepared; communicates effectively; enthusiasm helps students to learn; helps students learn by using explanations and practical examples; effectively uses subject knowledge to guide students' learning; assess understanding when teaching and gives constructive feedback about students' progress; seeks and responds to feedback from students; clearly communicates assessment requirements; treats students with respect; creates a positive learning environment for students; helps students to take responsibility for their own learning; and lastly is seen as a highly effective teacher.

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  • Being a leader in Open and Distance Higher Education.

    Seelig, C. (2013)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Towards a Unified Concept of Distance Learning.

    Strongman, L. (2013)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Research in global software engineering: a systematic snapshot

    Raza, B; MacDonell, SG; Clear, Tony (2014-01-09)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports our extended analysis of the recent literature addressing global software engineering (GSE), using a new Systematic Snapshot Mapping (SSM) technique. The primary purpose of this work is to understand what issues are being addressed and how research is being carried out in GSE – and comparatively, what work is not being conducted. We carried out the analysis in two stages. In the first stage we analyzed 275 papers published between January 2011 and June 2012, and in the second stage we augmented our analysis by considering a further 26 papers (from the 2013 International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE’13). Our results reveal that, currently, GSE studies are focused on management- and infrastructure-related factors, using principally evaluative research approaches. Most of the studies are conducted at the organizational level, mainly using methods such as interviews, surveys, field studies and case studies. The USA, India and China are major players in GSE, with USA-India collaborations being the most frequently studied, followed by USA-China. While a considerable number of GSE-related studies have been published since January 2011 they are currently quite narrowly focused, on exploratory research and explanatory theories, and the critical research paradigm has been untouched. An absence of formulative research, experimentation and simulation, and a related focus on evaluative approaches, all suggest that existing tools, methods and approaches from related fields are being tested in the GSE context, even though these may not be inherently applicable to the additional scale and complexity of GSE.

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  • A framework for product development

    McAloone, TC; Robotham, AJ (2014-01-07)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since the introduction of Integrated Product development in 1985, industry has widely been using this model to understand and articulate their design, business and production activities. Recently, however, the picture has started to alter, as the nature of industry’s business has had to adapt to a much more complex world and in many cases, Integrated Product Development is no longer a sufficient way of describing industry’s product development activity. This paper uses the model of Integrated Product Development as a start-point to exploring the changes that industry has been undergoing over the fifteen years since it was introduced and attempts to make pointers in the direction of a new framework for product development, which should guide industry in the future. The key research challenges that this paper identifies include: developing a framework that identifies and supports a multi-aspect approach to product development; understanding the strategic conditions that affect product development; developing a coherent approach to product quality based on product-life thinking; addressing environmental needs in a proactive manner through innovation techniques; and understanding both organisational and technical knowledge-management for improved product development

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  • Student self-assessment

    Brown, Gavin; Harris, LR (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Bills of Exchange'

    Hare, Christopher (2000)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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