1,904 results for Book item

  • Global Regulation of Nanotechnologies and Their Products in Medicine

    Moore, Jennifer (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Nanotechnology, an emerging technology, is creating innovative medicinal products for clinical use. The convergence of nanotechnologies with medicine is predicted to transform the health care sector, particularly pharmaceutical development. Jurisdictions, such as the European Union, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have witnessed the launch of medical products containing nanomaterials. Many of the nanomedicines on the market, in clinical testing, or under regulatory review, promise to improve existing products and treat diseases more effectively. The purposes of this chapter are to (a) describe nanotechnology, in particular, its clinical applications; (b) analyze the application of medical products regulation in several jurisdictions (the European Union, United States, Australia, and New Zealand); and (c) assess the adequacy of this law for managing the potential risks posed by nanomedicines. There are gaps in the public health/health science evidence about the risks associated with nanomedicines, and there is concern that the novel properties of some nanomedicines will bring unforeseen human and environmental health and safety risks. Analysts project that, by 2014, the market for medical products containing nanomaterials will be US$18 billion per year. Given the predicted market for nanomedicines, and the growing evidence of their potential risks, it is important to have adequate regulation of these products to prevent adverse public health outcomes. Regulators and clinicians will need to consider the risks posed by some nanomedicines against the potential benefits to patients who are prescribed these products.

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  • The Impact of Therapeutic Jurisprudence on the New Zealand Coronial Jurisdiction

    Moore, Jennifer (2015)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Coroners in New Zealand can make recommendations that may reduce the chances of occurrence of similar deaths in the future. Coronial recommendations can have pro-therapeutic outcomes. The recommendations hold therapeutic promise for bereaved families by refocusing families towards prevention of similar deaths. However, when coroners' recommendations are not implemented, this has counter-therapeutic outcomes for the community who deserve remedial action, and for families who hoped for change. This chapter uses evidence from New Zealand's first empirical study of coroners' recommendations. An empirical approach is taken because therapeutic jurisprudence is concerned with assessing the law's impact on people, and the study of impacts often requires data about people's experiences of legal processes.

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  • Case Study: The impact of social media on public information management

    Mersham, G. M. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Policing art: Political potential of creative practices in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Diprose, G. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

    Explores how creativity and social art practices can be understood as political activism.

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  • History: The development of library service in New Zealand

    Fields, A. J. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Open Polytechnic: Information and library studies programmes

    Fields, A. J. (2014)

    Book item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Waste management following earthquake disaster

    Brown, C. (2014)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Computer literacy: where are nurse educators on the continuum?

    Hanley, E. (2006)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Computers are becoming ubiquitous in health and education, and it is expected that nurses from undergraduate nursing programmes are computer literate when they enter the workforce. Similarly nurse educators are expected to be computer literate to model the use of information technology in their workplace. They are expected to use email for communication and a range of computer applications for presentation of course materials and reports. Additionally as more courses are delivered in flexible mode educators require more comprehensive computing skills, including confidence and competence in a range of applications. A cohort of nurse educators from one tertiary institution was surveyed to assess their perceived computer literacy and how they attained this. A questionnaire that covered seven domains of computer literacy was used to assess this. The results were illuminating and identified specific training needs for this group. Their perceived lack of skill with Groupwise email and the student database program are of concern as these are essential tools for nurse educators at this polytechnic.

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  • Towards a social ontology of improvised sound work

    Russell, B. (2010)

    Book item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Improvised sound work is one of the key areas of inter-generic hybridity in contemporary music. Any attempt to identify a social role and agree on a cultural meaning for such improvisational practice must grapple first with issues of definition. These issues are especially acute for emerging hybrid practices because their practical development outstrips the ability of the available critical/ideological structures to provide useful and generally agreed definitions for them.

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  • Storm over the Starship: A geosemiotic analysis of brand co-ownership

    Conroy, DM; Brookes, R (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Maori Education and Achievement

    McKinley, E.; Hoskins, Te Kawehau (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Interrupting Perpetual Flight

    Bywater, Jonathan (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Philosophical perspectives on music's expressiveness

    Davies, Stephen (2001)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Face Value. Perception and Knowledge of Others’ Happiness

    Zamuner, Edoardo (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Child Nutrition Guidelines and Gender

    Jonas, Monique (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Auckland's Centrepiece: Unsettled Identities, Unstable Monuments

    Bell, Leonard (2006)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Some key issues in post-admission language assessment

    Read, John (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter introduces the volume by briefly outlining trends in English-medium higher education internationally, but with particular reference to post-entry language assessment (PELA) in Australian universities. The key features of a PELA are described, in contrast to a placement test and an international proficiency test. There is an overview of each of the other chapters in the book, providing appropriate background information on the societies and education systems represented: Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the USA, New Zealand, Oman and South Africa. This is followed by a discussion of three themes running through several chapters. The first is how to validate post-admission language assessments; the second is the desirability of obtaining feedback from the test-takers; and the third is the extent to which a PELA is diagnostic in nature.

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  • Reflecting on the contribution of post-admission assessments

    Read, John (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter examines a number of issues arising from the earlier contributions to this volume. It considers the decision by a university about whether to introduce a post-admission language assessment in terms of the positive and negative messages such a decision may convey, as well as the costs versus the benefits. There is some discussion of the need to develop professional communication skills as attributes to enhance the employability of graduates and how such skills can be fostered, along with the development of academic literacy in the disciplines, through various forms of collaboration between English language specialists and academic teaching staff. Finally, it explores ideas related to the concept of English as a lingua franca and what implications they may have for the assessment of university students from different language backgrounds.

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  • Networking Learners Using Online Asynchronous Discussions

    Datt, Ashwini (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Online asynchronous discussions (OADs) are a prospective tool for creating learning networks that can minimize transactional distance and humanize distance learning. Using it to support effective communication and interaction among learners in video-based distance courses requires special skills and consideration. This research evaluates the use of OADs in a second and third year sociology undergraduate video-broadcast course (VBC). Patterns of participation and interaction were examined using the network and content analysis tools to determine the effectiveness of OADs as a pedagogical strategy. The role of the teacher in establishing a learning network between on-campus and distance students was also investigated.

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  • Evaluation of the linkage disequilibrium method for estimating effective population size

    Russell, James; Fewster, Rachel (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Data on linkage disequilibrium at unlinked loci provide an estimate of the inbreeding effective population size of the parental generation of the sampled cohort. The inbreeding effective population size, Ne, is the reciprocal of the probability that two gametes, selected at random without replacement from those that produced the sampled cohort, derive from the same parent. Effective population size is an important parameter for measuring the rate of inbreeding in a population. We detail the construction of the linkage disequilibrium estimator of Ne, and evaluate its performance by simulation. We simulate populations which are dioecious and non-selfing. We use the simulations to examine the effects of several types of deviation from ideal population conditions, and of sample size, genotyping errors, number of loci typed, and polymorphic loci. We find substantial bias in the Ne estimator when there have been recent fluctuations in census population size, when the index of breeding variability is greater than one, and when the ratio of sample size to effective population size differs substantially from one. Due to high variability, estimators that have low bias for the reciprocal of Ne can present substantial bias when used as estimators of Ne itself. We consider a recent small sample size bias correction proposed for the method, and find that it improves bias in the reciprocal, but at the expense of increased bias for Ne. The improvements in the bias of the reciprocal are usually small, but are substantial when sample size is much less than Ne, while the increase in bias for Ne is often substantial. We test the method on two exhaustively sampled rat populations, and find it performs as expected from simulation. For practitioners, we recommend that resources are spent first in ensuring that the sample size is likely to be greater than the effective population size, and only then that the number of loci is increased to improve the precision of the estimate.

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