1,919 results for Book item

  • Population Viability Analysis of Lear’s Macaw – Anodorhynchus leari (Análise de Viabilidade Populacional para Arara-azul-de-lear)

    Campos, Ivan; Lugarini, C; Sousa, AEB; Barbosa, AEA; Miyaki, CY; Aguilar, TM; Amaral, ACA; Linares, SFTP; Nascimento, JLX; Barros, YM; Guedes, NMR; Oliveira, KG (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Crise

    Silva, Pedro (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Extremes in Medical Facilities at Beaches

    Queiroga, AC; Webber, Jonathon (2014-10-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter will focus on medical facilities at beaches in two environments with diametrically opposed circumstances.

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  • First Aid Courses for the Aquatic Environment

    Szpilman, D; Morizot-Leite, L; de Vries, W; Beerman, S; Martinho, FNR; Smoris, L; Løfgren, B; Webber, Jonathon (2014-10-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    First aid in the aquatic environment requires specific skills and knowledge that are not taught in regular first aid education. Some topics are unique to aquatics. Target groups for such courses include persons living, playing, or working near or around the water. First aid courses tailored for the aquatic environment contribute to a competent rescue and resuscitation of a drowning victim and to the safety of the lay rescuer [1] or trained rescuer [2]. By including information on water safety awareness, these courses can also contribute to prevention and reduce the drowning burden. The relevance of an aquatic course was first extensively debated at an expert meeting Do we need a special first aid course for drowning victims during the World Congress on Drowning in the Netherlands 2002. Since 2002, first aid courses for the aquatic environment have been successfully organized around the world. This chapter reviews the importance and need of these courses and what has been learned

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  • Designing literacy education as modes of meaning in globalised and situated contexts: Towards a restoration of the self through embodied knowing

    Thwaites, Trevor (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The world of the twenty-first century is one that presents humans with diverse forms of identity, loyalty, and sense of place. The nation state appears all but redundant in this time of transnationalism and transculturalism, as ongoing migrations and re-affirmations of identity produce transient loyalties which make policy development problematic in areas such as education. The new empire is a global one, reflecting corporate economic ambition and territorial expansion—a type of colonisation by capitalist interests that we might call “globalisation”. Associated with this global empire are the new technologies of trading and communication which have produced new societal structures, such as social networks, that display various formations of information and cultural amateurs who promote themselves through the voyeuristic possibilities of the World Wide Web. The preparation of students for their life in these scenarios has been guided by governments and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), convinced that the future lies in a vaporous ambition called the ‘knowledge-economy’—a further complication for education policy. Where does that leave the self as an identity requiring forms of efficacy, personal ambition, and a sense of being-in-a-physical-world? This paper explores one facet of this question which is linked both to concepts of literacy and to the embodied self as one way of demonstrating that there are strategies for responding to the new environment. This way suggests giving agency to learners through a radical and embodied means of constructing knowledge and literacy that seeks to retain the humanness in schooling and which potentially empowers learners through the possibilities opened up by these ‘new’ pedagogies.

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  • Phage Integrases for Mediating Genomic Integration and DNA Recombination

    Maucksch, Christof (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    φC31 integrase is a site specific recombinase derived from the Streptomyces phage. In the phage lifecycle, the enzyme mediates lysogeny by mediating recombination between specific sequences termed attB (present in the bacterial DNA) and attP (present in the phage genome). Screening the enzyme activity in mammalian cells provided positive results and also showed that the enzyme retained its property of site specific recombination into mammalian genomes. Mammalian genomes have been shown to contain sequences that are similar to the wild type attP sequence of the Streptomyces phage genome and experiments with the integrase in mammalian cells showed that it could mediate recombination and subsequent integration of any DNA bearing an attB site into these pseudoattP sites. ...

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  • Engaging pedagogies for teacher education: Considering a modest critical pedagogy for preparing tomorrow's teachers

    Tinning, Richard (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Trois mouvements éthiques en recherche collaborative

    Maheux, Jean-Francois (2013)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • From text to pretext: An ethical turn in curriculum work

    Maheux, Jean-Francois; Swanson, D; Khan, S (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Opportunities and impediments: Drama in vocational education

    Heyward, Paul (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Community meets university on Mangere Mountain

    Jesson, Jocelyn (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Forms of participation in urban redevelopment projects - the differing roles of public and stakeholder contributions to design decision making processes

    Hunt, John (2006)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper examines how political commitment to participatory design within the context of a major urban redevelopment project was translated into a strategy and a course of action for achieving effective participation within a demanding project timeframe. The project in question involves a new transport interchange for the city of Auckland (New Zealand), the redevelopment of a number of heritage buildings, and the introduction of new buildings to create a mixed use precinct covering three city blocks. The project, currently being implemented, has involved extensive public consultation and stakeholder participation as it has proceeded through the stages of project visioning, an open public design competition, and the development of the competition winning design. The paper draws a distinction between the contributions of stakeholders versus the public at large to the decision-making process, outlines the different kinds of participatory processes adopted by the local authority (Auckland City Council) to effectively engage and involve these two different groups and the stages in the evolution of the project at which these different contributions were introduced. The model of ‘open design’ proposed by van Gunsteren and van Loon is used as a basis for explaining the success of multi-stakeholder inputs at a crucial stage in project development. The paper concludes by examining the limits of applicability of the ‘open design’ model in the context of urban redevelopment projects in which there is broad public interest, and by suggesting a number of design decision support guidelines for the management of participatory processes.

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  • St. Patrick on Bougainville, Papua New Guinea

    Laracy, Hugh (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Exploring Consumption's Pedagogy and Envisioning a Critical Pedagogy of Consumption - Living and learning in the Shadow of the "Shopocalypse"

    Sandlin, JA; McLaren, Peter (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Global Culture of Terror: A Marxist Riposte

    McLaren, Peter (2006)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Olli-Pekka Moisio, University of Jyvskyl, Finland Juha Suoranta, University of Minnesota, USA (eds.) The aim of this book is to raise current social, political, ...

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  • Critical Pedagogy as Revolutionary Practice

    McLaren, Peter (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Decolonizing Democratic Education: Marxian Ruminations

    McLaren, Peter (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Katrina And The Banshee's Wail: The Racilization Of Class Exploitation

    McLaren, Peter; Jaramillo, NE (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Behaviour of invader ship rats experimentally released behind a pest-proof fence, Maungatautari, New Zealand

    Innes, J; Watts, C; Fitzgerald, NL; Thornburrow, D; Burns, B; MacKay, Jamie; Speedy, C (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Six ship (roof, black) rats (Rattus rattus) were cage-trapped adjacent to a pest-proof fence and released with radio transmitters inside the 65 ha pest-free exclosure at Maungatautari, North Island, New Zealand, to mimic reinvasion. Unexpectedly, four of the six rats climbed back out of the exclosure and returned to their original home ranges after periods ranging from a few hours to seven days. All six rats travelled along the fence top at some time during follows, and only three of the six used tracking tunnels set on a 50 m grid inside the exclosure to detect invaders. The rats that remained inside the fence stayed within C. 100m of the release point for about three days, then made increasingly large (to 1100m) movements into the reserve. Resultant range lengths greatly exceeded those of four other rats radio-tracked outside the fence where rat density was higher. This behaviour is very similar to that reported for experimentally released house mice (Mus musculus) and Norway rats (R. norvegicus) on islands. These results suggest that a) some invading ship rats may themselves vacate a fenced sanctuary without encountering efforts to detect and remove them; b) rats at low density have much larger movements than occur in home ranges at typically higher mainland densities, and c) managers should target rat invaders with detection and killing devices within 100 m of a fence breach for at least three days, and some traps should be set on top of the fence.

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  • Aloha for Sale: A Class Analysis of Hawaii

    Ryoo, J; McLaren, Peter (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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