2,003 results for Book item

  • Maori Disputes and Their Resolution

    Quince, Khylee (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Tumeke

    Chant, Lisa (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Media Portrayals of Motherhood in Parenting Magazines in Contemporary Japan

    Shimoda, Tomoko (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Case Study as Antidote to the Literal

    Kushner, Saville (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Much programme and policy evaluation yields to the pressure to report on the productivity of programmes and is perforce compliant with the conditions of contract. Too often the view of these evaluations is limited to a literal reading of the analytical challenge. If we are evaluating X we look critically at X1, X2 and X3. There might be cause for embracing adjoining data sources such as W1 and Y1. This ignores frequent realities that an evaluation specification is only an approximate starting point for an unpredictable journey into comprehensive understanding; that the specification represents only that which is wanted by the sponsor, and not all that may be needed; and that the contractual specification too often insists on privileging the questions and concerns of a few. Case study evaluation proves an alternative that allows for the less-than-literal in the form of analysis of contingencies how people, phenomena and events may be related in dynamic ways, how context and action have only a blurred dividing line and how what defines the case as a case may only emerge late in the study.

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  • Using assessment to enhance learning for the Net Generation

    Ovens, AP; Garbett, D; Heap, R (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Assessment has traditionally been seen as a way of finding out what students have learned. There has been a relatively recent shift to embedding assessment as an integral aspect of the learning culture of Net Generation learners. In such a shift, pedagogical encounters are characterised by learners engaging with and connecting to other key agentive elements in ways that combine to create a personalised learning network that extends outwards from each student. In this chapter, we focus on four case studies that enhance learning by viewing assessment as part of the ongoing activity emerging from such pedagogical encounters. Each case study acknowledges that an essential part of working with the Net Generation of learners is having a greater sensitivity to how they make sense of learning activities and enacting forms of assessment that are more student centred, reflective and proactive in enabling students to self-manage their learning activity. This has required numerous changes in our roles as teachers, changes in the role of students, changes in the nature of student–teacher interaction and changes in the relationship between the teacher, the student and the course content. One important insight is that if teachers are to be leading learning in their classrooms, it behoves them to become Net Generation learners themselves. We conclude by suggesting that assessment must be deeply embedded as a part of student learning culture and be evoked in ways that work for the Net Generation of learners.

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  • Identifying phrasal connectives in Italian using quantitative methods

    Tamburini, F; De Sanctis, C; Zamuner, Edoardo (2002)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Seeing What Others Feel

    Zamuner, Edoardo (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Seeing Faces, Seeing Emotions

    Zamuner, Edoardo (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Māori body in education: From 'good with their hands’ to the ’long brown tail’

    Stewart, Georgina (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Whose research? Whose reality? The identity politics of education science

    Stewart, Georgina (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    John Schostak argues that qualitative research methods give voice to the experiences and interests of under-represented groups in society, and therefore have greater emancipatory potential than quantitative methods. He highlights the political significance of the link between positivist-influenced ideas of what counts as valid educational research and the exclusion of qualitative studies from major government-funded programmes. Greater socio-political justice is a worthy aim shared by many educational researchers, and for this reason the chapter makes a valuable contribution. This response examines the links drawn by Schostak between debates at the philosophical and political levels, finds some to be overstated, and argues that social science research invariably reflects the perspectives and ethos of the researcher. In this sense, the emancipatory potential of educational research depends more on its scholarly orientation, or academic identity, than on the empirical methods it employs.

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  • Beyond shush: Talking to your librarian about teaching for tomorrow today

    Moselen, Christine (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Teaching for tomorrow today in academic libraries is primarily a conversation around information literacy (IL) and lifelong learning; IL is “a prerequisite and essential enabler for lifelong learning” (Bundy, 2004, p.4). But it is not just libraries who are interested in lifelong learning. The New Zealand education system also has a strong interest in lifelong learning as seen in the New Zealand Curriculum whose vision for the future is “young people who will be confident, connected, actively involved, lifelong learners." (Ministry of Education, 2007, p.7). This paper discusses the broadening concepts of literacy (and information literacy) in schools and universities and the need to develop a culture of continuous learning to meet the perceived needs of the 21st century workplace. It argues that academic libraries, with their focus on learning and teaching, have a critical role to play in the development of such a culture. The paper outlines, in the context of international and local literature, why it is important that teachers of today (and tomorrow) acquire the skills necessary to make them future-proof; it describes what those skills are, and provides examples of the collaboration between academic staff, librarians and learning advisers which have resulted in the integration of academic and information literacy skills into the curriculum.

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  • University teaching: Unpicking some issues

    Jesson, Jocelyn (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Māori Party and Newspaper Coverage

    Sullivan, Ann (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Fluid Forms: owning water in Australia

    Strang, Veronica (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Nietzsche's Evolutionary Ethics

    Small, R (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Patterns of replacement in the Samoan lexicon

    Clark, David (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Multisensor data fusion strategies for advanced driver assistance systems

    Rezaei, Mahdi; Sabzevari, R (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Peering Upwards: Researching Ruling-Class Men

    Donaldson, M; Poynting, Noel (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Paratext, an Alternative in Boundary Crossing: A Complementary Approach to Translation Analysis

    Kung, Szu-Wen (2013-12-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    While translation studies primarily focuses on the verbal texts or the translated texts in excavating the mediated traces of the translation players, recent paratextual researches in translation studies have pinpointed the key roles fo the paratexts, particularly in mainfesting the purposeful intervention of the translation players in appropriating the reception of the translation in the target culture (Watts 2000:29-45). This paper aims to argue that aside from textual analysis of the translated text, the paratexts are thought to contain vital clues for the researchers to infer or understand the translational phenomena absent or implicit in the translated text. The paper will place an emphasis on how paratextual materials or paratexts were used in the translation series, Modern Chinese Literature from Taiwan published by Columbia University Press in USA.

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  • Bosnian or Bosniac: Aspects of a Contemporary Slavic Language Question

    Greenberg, Robert (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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