1,844 results for Book item

  • Grammaticalization and Strategies in Resolving Subject Marking Paradoxes: The Case of Tsimshianic

    Brown, Jason; Peterson, T (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents a case study of what we will call ergative/nominative paradoxes, which we claim are found in the Tsimshianic language family, but which are possibly found in other languages as well. Such paradoxes are said to arise when both nominative and ergative morphology is simultaneously indexed or related to the same subject. Although these languages manifest this subject marking paradox in different ways, we conjecture that the paradox itself is the result of an ergative system decaying into an accusative one, and that one strategy for languages to relieve the pressure of such a paradox is to develop new paradigms of differential subject marking.

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  • The Wisdom Hierarchy and a Culture of Safety and Improvement in General Practice: Where Do We Now Stand?

    Wallis, Katharine; Dovey, SM (2014-05)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter introduces ideas about how a safety culture is a necessary part of providing safer primary health care. Taking a definition of “culture” as the shared assumptions that underlie how people perceive and act, we consider how these assumptions and values might change within the framework of Ackoff’s “wisdom hierarchy”. We suggest that a culture of safety includes: holding a perception of the data held in medical records as the main tool for everyday protection of patient safety in primary care; developing understanding of patients and the healthcare environment; considering engagement in research a professional responsibility; promoting the dissemination of research via other methods than publication in scientific journals; and acquiring skills in judgement that lead to deliberate actions to provide safer care.

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  • New Zealand prospective teacher conceptions of assessment and academic performance: Neither student nor practicing teacher

    Brown, Gavin (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conceptions of assessment are critical components of prospective teacher learning about assessment. Students (n=324) enrolled in a 2nd-year course on classroom assessment responded to the Teachers’ Conceptions of Assessment Abridged (TCoA-IIIA) inventory. Confirmatory factor analysis found that the model for practicing teachers was not well-fitting and an alternative five factor model was found (i.e., assessment improves student learning and teaching; assessment is ignored and is inaccurate, assessment is bad, assessment measures school quality validly, and assessment grades students). Students more than moderately agreed that assessment improves student learning and teaching and that assessment grades students. A structural equation model found that only one conception of assessment negatively predicted course total grade (β=-.23) and/or test score (β=-.29). The study showed that prospective teachers have quite different patterns and effects in their conceptions of assessment than practicing teachers and high school students.

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  • 考试制度及其影响: 成本高、挑战大 - 对中国教育的深度反思 [Exams, ranks and consequences: A considered reflection on education in China]

    Brown, Gavin (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Teachers’ use of research to improve practice: Why should we, how could we?

    Sinnema, Claire; Aitken, G (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bourdieu comes off the bench: A reflexive analysis of the circulation of ideas within the sociology of sport field

    Pringle, Richard (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Does employee downsizing really work?

    Datta, DK; Basuil Tobias, Dynah (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over the past couple of decades, employee downsizing has become a fact of organizational life, not just in the U.S. but, increasingly so, in other countries, with unprecedented levels of downsizing occurring in several countries during the last recession. Seen as being inevitable in an increasingly competitive global marketplace, the high levels of downsizing activity attest to the deep-seated belief among managers that downsizing enhances organizational efficiency and leads to improved financial performance. Critics, on the other hand, argue that benefits are illusory and point out that attendant costs, both visible and invisible, can make downsizing a relatively ineffective tool for creating firm value. After a brief discussion of the factors that motivate and propel firms to engage in downsizing, we, in this article, examine the findings of extant research to assess whether downsizing does indeed improve organization performance. What we find based on our examination of 55 studies is that the findings are equivocal with very little agreement among researchers on the efficacy of employee downsizing to create organizational value. We explore possible reasons for the same and conclude by providing directions for future research that, we believe, will provide the insights that scholars and managers need to better understand the complex relationship between employee downsizing and firm value.

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  • Incarceration

    Webb, Robert (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Levers

    Kwan, Alistair (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Levers in animal locomotion, machinery, art and mathematics. Optical levers, so-called "leverage" in business and politics.

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  • Middle Ages

    Kwan, Alistair (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mathematics in the European middle ages, in particular its character in the Carolingian Renascence and the Scholastic period, and especially the ethnomathematics of medieval architecture. Higher mathematics in the adjacent caliphates — both al-Andalus and Baghdad.

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  • Artistic Expression and the Hard Case of Pure Music

    Davies, Stephen (2006)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Contra the Hypothetical Persona in Music

    Davies, Stephen (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Foundations for the Logic of Questions and Commands

    Girle, Roderic; McKeown-Green, J (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recent interest in logics for questions and commands has been prompted partly by a recognition that reasoned argument often involves moves that are not truth-evaluable, and partly by the use of questions and commands in most procedural programming. The authors argue that certain methodological issues must be addressed before we can agree on the purpose and nature of logics for questions and commands. They deny that formulas in such logics should correspond to sentences in ordinary language. They consider how formulas should be interpreted, focusing especially on questions. The authors argue that logics designed to capture the conditions for correct reasoning involving questions require a semantics that treats question-answer pairs as values. This emphasis brings to the fore issues about questions in premise-conclusion arguments. In both premise-conclusion and dialogical argumentation, the authors argue that logic should aim to capture moves in reasoning, not facts about sentences.

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  • What Could the University Be?

    Sturm, Sean; Turner, SF (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Othering “Lebs”: Racialised demonisation of Lebanese immigrants in Australia

    Poynting, Noel (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper demonstrates how the Lebanese immigrant population in Australia (and especially its largest city, Sydney) has quite a distinct experience from elsewhere in the Lebanese diaspora in the way they have been perceived and represented. Over the past two decades, Lebanese immigrants in Sydney have been ideologically associated with inherent criminality: they have been racialised and criminalised at the same time. A whole younger generation, of second- and third-generation Lebanese immigrants, has grown up having to live with, and to respond to, being defined in that way. This chapter traces that process of racialisation and criminalisation by focusing on some key flashpoints over this period, and also gives some indication of how Lebanese Australians in Sydney have experienced this ‘othering’.

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  • Music-to-listener emotional contagion

    Davies, Stephen (2013-07-11)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The author advocates the notion that music elicits emotion through a process of emotional contagion, defined as a 'mirroring' response in which the listener is moved to feel the emotion that the music expresses. In this chapter the author develops this notion and contrasts it with various psychological theories of imitation or mimicry. In particular, the crucial idea concerning what is intentional object of a musically induced emotion must be examined. It is argued that the music is not the emotional object of the response because the listener does not believe anything of the music that would make it the intentional object of a sad response, namely, that the music is unfortunate, suffering, or regrettable.

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  • Emotions Expressed and Aroused by Music: Philosophical Perspectives

    Davies, Stephen (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Encouraging notions of social justice through young children’s play: Experiences in Pasifika early childhood teacher education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Leaupepe, Manutai (2013-05)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    When I think of the word 'play,' numerous ideas come to mind. Play has meant different things to different people across different cultural, historical, and social spheres. Play, within Early Childhood Education (ECE) in Aotearoa New Zealand, continues to be the driving force for curriculum planning decisions, and predominantly features in the educational programmes offered to young children (Hedges, 2003; Leaupepe, 2010). The national Early Childhood Curriculum, Te Whariki (Ministry of Education, 1996) recognizes the contributions play provides to the holistic development of the child, and emphasizes the need for Early Childhood teachers to create spaces and environments where children's play is valued as meaningul leaning. The acceptance of play within ECE settings appear to have been uncontested and unchallenged with reference to its relevance (Ailwood, 2003; Leaupepe, 20 11a). Since its early developments within the kindergarten movement, Frobel's idea of children playing within natural environments as free-spirited beings has been inluential to the kinds of practices evident within ECE environments (Leaupepe, 2011a; May, 2001). We have seen shifts in pedagogical paradigms that now challenge early childhood teachers to reconceptualise play in relation to its purpose and nature (Hill, 2006; Leaupepe, 201 l b).

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  • Ecology and paleoecology in Ecology and paleoecology in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, during the last 6000 years based in benthic foraminifera assemblage variations

    Vilela, CG; Figueira, BO; Batista Neto, JA (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Neste volume, são apresentados os resultados da percepção de geocientistas sobre a importância dos fósseis em sua diversidade de aplicações e possibilidades de compreensão do mundo passado e presente.

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  • Reproductive and Gynaecological Health

    Dunn, S; Wise, Michelle; Johnson, L; Anderson, G; Ferris, LE; Yeritsyan, N; Croxford, R; Fu, L; Degani, N; Bierman, AS (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter focuses on the health of women as it specifically relates to their reproductive systems. Unlike other POWER Study chapters that examine the complex interplay between sex and health in the context of conditions that affect both men and women, this chapter focuses primarily on how the characteristics of women -- how old they are, how well educated, how wealthy, where they live -- affects health and health care issues that are unique to women. The issues covered in this chapter span the life course from teenage pregnancy to hysterectomy in older women.

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