1,882 results for Book item

  • Music, definitions of

    Davies, Stephen (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Experience of Music

    Davies, Stephen (2003)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • twentieth-century Anglo-American aesthetics

    Davies, Stephen; Stecker, R (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Dal Monte Ventoso a Point Lenana: la sfida di Wu Ming al postmoderno

    Manai, Franco (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Commercial decisions in the Supreme Court of New Zealand: The prominence of agency law in the first ten years

    Watts, Peter (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Live Farm Animal Exports

    Dare, Tim (2016-07-25)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Postcolonial security, development and biopolitics: targeting women’s lives in Solomon Islands

    Lacey, Anita (2016-01-28)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mentoring and the Transfer of Organizational Memory within the Context of an Aging Workforce: Cultural Implications for Competitive Advantage

    Dunham, Annette; Burt, CDB (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Organizational memory, the knowledge gained from organizational experience, has significant potential for competitive advantage. Many authors in the knowledge management and human resource management literatures consider mentoring to be a particularly effective method of transferring organizational memory. In addition, older workers are often considered ideal mentors in organizations because of their experience and alleged willingness to pass on their knowledge to less experienced employees. There is an associated assumption that these workers also anticipate and experience positive outcomes when mentoring others. This chapter considers whether these assumptions hold up in the workplaces of the 21st century, particularly within Western countries. Individualistic cultural norms and some discriminatory practices towards older workers, along with a changing career contract that no longer guarantees employment in one organization for life, may discourage knowledge sharing in organizations. This chapter discusses the constraints and motivations that may operate when older experienced workers consider mentoring others. It considers relevant global and organizational cultural characteristics that may influence mentoring to transfer knowledge, and accordingly suggests strategies for those eager to capitalise on the knowledge experienced employees possess.

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  • What can reverse mentoring models contribute to communities of practice involving developed and rising economies?

    Dunham, Annette; Ross, M (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Communities of practice have been proposed as effective means of building cooperative knowledge sharing relationships between locals and experts from emerging and developed economies (including divisions within some multinational companies). Mentoring relationships in general have been found to support the work of communities of practice. Reverse mentoring relationships are the reverse to what is traditionally expected of a mentoring relationship; they involve the mentoring of a mature or more experienced employee by a younger or generally less experienced employee, but also have the potential to offer much to communities of practice. In the context of communities of practice involving developed and emerging economies, reverse mentoring relationships have the potential to facilitate nationals' (the reverse mentors) sharing of local knowledge while at the same time providing them with leadership development courtesy of the developed country's representative(s) (the reverse mentee(s)), a winning solution for communities of practice and multinational companies. This chapter outlines the benefits of reverse mentoring relationships for communities of practice, and identifies some potential challenges for these partnerships. The implications of these for managers and practitioners are outlined. An agenda for research into reverse mentoring arrangements will complete this chapter. The aim of the chapter is to show how reverse mentoring relationships can complement the work of communities of practice in fostering co-operative knowledge sharing between those in developed and emerging economies.

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  • A dynamic metacognitive systems perspective on language learner autonomy

    Zhang, Lawrence (2016-02-08)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Afterword.

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  • Black Fella Land: White Fella Tax - Changing the CGT Implications of Aboriginal/Native

    Cassidy, Julie (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Context and complexity on the arid margins of Australia: Assessing human reponses to an unpredictable environment

    Holdaway, Simon; Shiner, J; Fanning, Patricia; Douglass, MJ (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Airway Management Skills and Equipment for Aquatic First Responders

    Hood, N; Webber, Jonathon (2014-10-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The mainstay of treatment in drowning patients is removal from the aquatic environment and reinstitution of breathing with air or oxygen. Rescue and resuscitation by aquatic first responders who can institute immediate basic and intermediate life support offers the best chance of survival.

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  • Culture and agency in Mormon women’s lives

    Inouye, Melissa (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A religious rhetoric of competing modernities: Christian print culture in late Qing China

    Inouye, Melissa (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • How does Water Sensitive Design compare with old approaches

    van Roon, Marjorie (2015-04-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The beautiful in Bali

    Davies, Stephen (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Indonesian island of Bali has often been described as a paradise. In terms of natural beauty, this seems appropriate. Volcanic cones, deep valleys full of verdant vegetation, colorful and exotic flowers and butterflies, yellow sand beaches, turquoise oceans–all establish the island’s physical beauty. And human contributions often add to the splendor. For instance, the sides of mountains can be softened and elaborated by intricately terraced rice fields. But these environmental features are common to many tropical locations in southeast Asia. To understand why Bali is so often singled out for praise, it is necessary to appreciate how the island’s distinctive religion and cosmology pervade life in all its aspects. And given that the Balinese gods are connoisseurs of beauty, this explains why the Balinese people are committed to the creation and presentation of beauty as a religious duty. This obligation aesthetically affects their everyday lives, architecture, and arts.

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  • Model-Based Interpretation of Skin Microstructural and Mechanical Measurements

    Jor, JWY; Parker, MD; Nash, MP; Taberner, Andrew; Nielsen, PMF (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Accurate characterization of skin mechanics requires model-based interpretation of skin mechanical and structural measurements. Due to difficulties in measuring properties of in vivo skin, research efforts have focused largely on the characterization of in vitro skin. In this chapter, we review state-of-the-art constitutive models, with particular focus on structural models that can provide valuable insights into the relationship between tissue microstructure and mechanical response of skin. Constitutive parameter estimation remains a challenge and relies on the availability of a comprehensive range of deformation measurements of skin under various loading conditions. We provide a summary of current imaging techniques to visualize and quantify skin microstructure (such as collagen fiber organization) and instrumentation used for measuring the mechanical response of the skin. To enhance our understanding of skin mechanics, future research effort should focus on the integration of noninvasive in vivo imaging modalities, mechanical testing, and computational modeling.

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  • Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase: Structure, Dynamics, Function, and Evolution

    Pearce, G; Hudson, AO; Loomes, Kerry; Dobson, RCJ (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Enzymes are usually comprised of multiple subunits and more often than not they are made up of identical subunits. In this review we examine lysine biosynthesis and focus on the enzyme dihydrodipicolinate synthase in terms of its structure, function and the evolution of its varied number of subunits (quaternary structure). Dihydrodipicolinate synthase is the first committed step in the biosynthesis of lysine, which occurs naturally in plants, bacteria, archaea and fungi, but is not synthesized in mammals. In bacteria, there have been four separate pathways identified from tetrahydrodipicolinate to meso-diaminopimelate, which is the immediate precursor to lysine. Dihydrodipicolinate synthases from many bacterial and plant species have been structurally characterised and the results show considerable variability with respect to their quaternary structure, hinting at their evolution. The oligomeric state of the enzyme plays a key role, both in catalysis and in the allosteric regulation of the enzyme by lysine. While most bacteria and plants have tetrameric enzymes, where the structure of the dimeric building blocks is conserved, the arrangement of the dimers differs. We also review a key development in the field, namely the discovery of a human dihydrodipicolinate synthase-like enzyme, now known as 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate aldolase. This discovery complicates the rationale underpinning drug development against bacterial dihydrodipicolinate synthases, since genetic errors in 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate aldolase cause the disease Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 3 and therefore compounds that are geared towards the inhibition of bacterial dihydrodipicolinate synthase may be toxic to mammalian cells.

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  • Human environmental interrelationships and the origins of agriculture in Egypt and Sudan

    Holdaway, Simon; Phillipps, Rebecca (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Northeast Africa forms an interesting case study for investigating the relationship between changes in environment and agriculture. Major climatic changes in the early Holocene led to dramatic changes in the environment of the eastern Sahara and to the habitation of previously uninhabitable regions. Research programs in the eastern Sahara have uncovered a wealth of archaeological evidence for sustained occupation during the African Humid Period, from about 11,000 years ago. Initial studies of faunal remains seemed to indicate early shifts in economic practice toward cattle pastoralism. Although this interpretation was much debated when it was first proposed, the possibility of early pastoralism stimulated discussion concerning the relationships between people and animals in particular environmental contexts, and ultimately led to questions concerning the role of agriculture imported from elsewhere in contrast to local developments. Did agriculture, or indeed cultivation and domestication more generally (sensu Fuller & Hildebrand, 2013), develop in North Africa, or were the concepts and species imported from Southwest Asia? And if agriculture did spread from elsewhere, were just the plants and animals involved, or was the shift part of a full socioeconomic suite that included new subsistence strategies, settlement patterns, technologies, and an agricultural “culture”? And finally, was this shift, wherever and however it originated, related to changes in the environment during the early to mid-Holocene? These questions refer to the “big ideas” that archaeologists explore, but before answers can be formed it is important to consider the nature of the material evidence on which they are based. Archaeologists must consider not only what they discover but also what might be missing. Materials from the past are preserved only in certain places, and of course some materials can be preserved better than others. In addition, people left behind the material remains of their activities, but in doing so they did not intend these remains to be an accurate historical record of their actions. Archaeologists need to consider how the remains found in one place may inform us about a range of activities that occurred elsewhere for which the evidence may be less abundant or missing. This is particularly true for Northeast Africa where environmental shifts and consequent changes in resource abundance often resulted in considerable mobility. This article considers the origins of agriculture in the region covering modern-day Egypt and Sudan, paying particular attention to the nature of the evidence from which inferences about past socioeconomies may be drawn.

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