1,882 results for Book item

  • Promoting health equity

    Reid, Mary-Jane (2015-08-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    To many of us who work in health, health promotion and health equity are natural travelling companions. What could be more closely aligned than the community development and advocacy intentions of health promotion, and the social justice focus of health equity? In our work, however, we are surrounded by numerous examples where, despite our best intentions, health promotion interventions have widened health inequities. In this chapter we look closely at the relationship between health promotion and health equity. Many people reading this book will be more familiar with health promotion than health equity, and so relatively more of this chapter is spent defining, understanding and contextualising health equity. Following this introduction, we examine the challenge of undertaking health promotion while keeping health equity firmly in mind, using examples from important health promotion challenges that have been the focus of our attention during the last decades. We review how health promotion can impact health equity unintentionally and negatively, and formulate a plan for assessing health promotion activities against health equity standards. Finally, we note the changing political landscape for both health equity and health promotion, and reflect on what this means for the way we practise health promotion into the future.

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  • Extending post-entry assessment to the doctoral level: New challenges and opportunities

    Read, John; von Randow, J (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Since 2011, first-year doctoral candidates at The University of Auckland have been required to take the Diagnostic English Language Needs Assessment (DELNA) as part of a university-wide programme to identify students who are in need of significant language enrichment. This step was taken in response to research by the School of Graduate Studies suggesting that language difficulties often impacted on effective relationships between supervisors and their doctoral candidates, and progress in general. To ensure that such difficulties are addressed early in their study, candidates whose performance in DELNA indicates they need further language development attend an advisory session to discuss appropriate academic English enrichment programmes, and set specific goals to be achieved by the end of their provisional year. Although the doctoral learning process has often been studied from a variety of perspectives, there has been considerably less investigation of the language learning experiences of international doctoral students. This study focuses on 20 doctoral candidates in their first year and includes their reaction to DELNA, their response to the language advice they received, their evaluation of the language enrichment activities they engaged in, the strategies they used to adapt to their new environment, and their relationship with their supervisors. Results suggest that they welcome the fact that the University is proactive in responding to their language needs, and find that the specific programmes undertaken have increased their confidence in writing and their ability to express themselves better in all academic contexts.

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  • Cell Division and Cell Differentiation

    David, Karine (2016-10-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Plant growth and development is driven by the continuous production of new cells. The processes involved in making it possible for a cell to give rise to two daughter cells define the cell division cycle. Plant development requires a fine control of cell division (rate, cell cycle exit and reactivation, endoreplication) and differentiation. By affecting cell numbers and organ formation, cell division and differentiation will affect plant growth and can therefore have a profound impact on yield and biomass production. Understanding the balance between cell division and cell differentiation, the key players in those processes, will help in the breeding of new, high-yielding varieties as well as improving plant regeneration processes in vitro.

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  • Population Viability Analysis of Lear’s Macaw – Anodorhynchus leari (Análise de Viabilidade Populacional para Arara-azul-de-lear)

    Campos, Ivan; Lugarini, C; Sousa, AEB; Barbosa, AEA; Miyaki, CY; Aguilar, TM; Amaral, ACA; Linares, SFTP; Nascimento, JLX; Barros, YM; Guedes, NMR; Oliveira, KG (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • And Everything Nice

    Davies, Stephen (2016-07)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter critically reviews evolutionary psychologists’ accounts of sexual attractiveness. They focus on female physical beauty and its appeal to heterosexual men. Judgments of physical attractiveness tend to track both health and genes that are good either in general or because they complement those of the chooser. This account of sexual attraction is thin and one-dimensional, however. How we assess people, and whether we are sexually drawn to them, depends importantly on aspects of character and performance that go beyond physical appearance. Indeed, these further assessments can even affect our rating of a person’s physical appearance. So, sexual attraction and attractiveness are bound up generally with social performance. In addition, making oneself sexually attractive can be part of making the best of one’s social self-presentation. In this case, it invites the other’s appreciation but not an overtly sexual response.

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  • Funds of knowledge

    Hedges, Helen (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sociocultural theories explain ways that humans participate intently in informal family, community, and cultural activities and practices; learn naturally through these; and construct multiple identities. Diversity of, and within, families and cultures is now a global theme. Adopting culturally sensitive and equitable approaches and constructs to guide the education of children from diverse backgrounds is therefore vital. Funds of knowledge is an empowering construct developed as an early example of culturally responsive pedagogy. Previously, responses to educational achievement lags by ethnic minority children had taken on a deficit approach based on an assumption that the poor quality of these children’s home experiences meant they were not able to manage the demands of academic learning. Instead, funds of knowledge approaches explore the rich knowledge and lived experiences of families and cultures that can be drawn on in educational settings to enhance learning. It is therefore a concept of potential value to early childhood education where partnerships between families and educators are strongly promoted. The concept is dynamic, as it changes with each relationship in each family and evolves to new circumstances and cultures. Funds of knowledge can be considered as a theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical tool.

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  • Minding the body in physical education

    Ovens, Alan; Powell, Darren (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Crise

    Silva, Pedro (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Extremes in Medical Facilities at Beaches

    Queiroga, AC; Webber, Jonathon (2014-10-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter will focus on medical facilities at beaches in two environments with diametrically opposed circumstances.

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  • Fathers and sons: An autoethnographic performance of trauma, bereavement, and transformation

    Bray, Peter; Bray, O (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Just before Sam died, his son Peter travelled from his home in Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand, to conduct some preliminary research with his son Oliver who lives in Leeds, Great Britain. With Peter’s interests in loss, post-traumatic growth and transpersonal experiences and Oliver’s in theatre making, performance and pedagogy they began to discover that they share much common ground. Shortly after their time together Peter travelled to Moscow to deliver a paper on Hamlet. What follows is a weaving of the thoughts and recollections of three generations of men touched by loss, trauma and grief. First presented in 2011 in Prague, the Czech Republic, this text was originally conceived as a palliative response to Sam’s death in England a year earlier. In this new text we allow our curiosity to continue exploring those traumatic wounds that have had, for better or for worse, such a significant impact upon our lives as a father and a son. In expressing some of our loss experiences we begin to understand that our lives, people’s lives, far from the normal, predictable and humdrum are essentially and powerfully unique. Bearing and baring the scars of life’s seemingly random and unconscionable wounding, the legacy of lives fully lived, we share the paradox of these unwanted but necessary losses. We discover that traumatic events are significant opportunities for individuals to start again, to re-assemble and re-learn their lives, make important changes, and take on the challenge of a world that has fundamentally changed, become less predictable and comfortable, and more difficult to manage. Key Words: Autoethnography, consciousness, father, ghost, grief, loss, performance, son, transpersonal, trauma.

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  • First Aid Courses for the Aquatic Environment

    Szpilman, D; Morizot-Leite, L; de Vries, W; Beerman, S; Martinho, FNR; Smoris, L; Løfgren, B; Webber, Jonathon (2014-10-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    First aid in the aquatic environment requires specific skills and knowledge that are not taught in regular first aid education. Some topics are unique to aquatics. Target groups for such courses include persons living, playing, or working near or around the water. First aid courses tailored for the aquatic environment contribute to a competent rescue and resuscitation of a drowning victim and to the safety of the lay rescuer [1] or trained rescuer [2]. By including information on water safety awareness, these courses can also contribute to prevention and reduce the drowning burden. The relevance of an aquatic course was first extensively debated at an expert meeting Do we need a special first aid course for drowning victims during the World Congress on Drowning in the Netherlands 2002. Since 2002, first aid courses for the aquatic environment have been successfully organized around the world. This chapter reviews the importance and need of these courses and what has been learned

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  • Valuation of Yoruba Sacred Shrines, Monuments, and Groves for Compensation

    Aluko, BT; Omisore, EO; Amidu, Abdul-Rasheed (2008-07-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A sacred site is a place, which is considered holy and is partially or wholly reserved for magico – religious or ceremonial functions. Because of this, compensation valuation upon compulsory acquisition of these places is a complex and specialised one requiring the interpretation of law and our past cultural heritage. Consequently, the chapter, adopting a survey technique and simple descriptive statistics, examines sacred places, the provisions of the enabling compensation laws, the valuation process and the attendant problems in the assessment of compensation that fully equalled the pecuniary detriments faced by owners upon acquisition of these sites in the Yorubaland. This chapter reveals the conflicting provisions in the compensation enactments and the threat of the extinction of the role of traditional worshippers or priests, which is an outcome of the assessment of compensation of the places in the study area. In addition, based on empirical evidence of recent transactions on sacred places in the country the chapter concludes that compensation can hardly be adequate for sacred sites because of their social and cultural importance functions, although a review of the compensation laws, as well as training of curators of shrines and sacred places, may be necessary to ensure reliability of compensation valuation in the Yorubaland portion of Nigeria.

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  • The Multiple Interpretability of Musical Works

    Davies, Stephen (2002)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Musical Representation

    Davies, Stephen (2001)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Evaluation of Music

    Davies, Stephen (1994)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sovereigns, Sovereignty and the Treaty of Waitangi

    Davies, Stephen; Ewin, RE (1992)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Emotional Contagion

    Davies, Stephen (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Protolanguage

    Davies, Stephen (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Non-Western Art and Art's Definition

    Davies, Stephen (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Definitions of Art

    Davies, Stephen (2013-04)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The third edition of the acclaimed Routledge Companion to Aesthetics contains over sixty chapters written by leading international scholars covering all aspects of aesthetics.

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