1,996 results for Book item

  • Qualit?? ambientale: approccio bioclimatico e riqualificazione del patrimonio esistente per il social housing / Environmental quality: sustainable approach and retrofit of the existing building heritage for social housing

    Albino, V; Boarin, Paola (2016-02-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although European Community and national mandatory requirements are pushing towards existing buildings energy retrofit actions based on the energy efficiency upgrading of the building and service equipment system, the approach on the existing social housing needs to move beyond the simple energy saving actions and to be evaluated as a process, whose goal is the valorisation of the overall building value, from the single building to the district scale, with attention to the building stock???s quality and to the occupants??? well-being. Through existing buildings??? energy retrofit it is indeed possible to achieve significant targets in terms of ???eco-systemic??? quality, where attention must be oriented, in an integrated way, towards occupants??? comfort requirements (thermal, acoustic, visual, olfactory, and tactile), building management, security and fruition issues. In this sense, the low technological and functional quality of the existing social housing stock, together with its extension, can be considered as a strategic ???resource??? and the retrofit action as a decisive ???tool??? for the improvement of the energy, environmental, and housing quality.

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  • Experiment-to-causation inference: Understanding causality in a probabilistic setting

    Pfannkuch, Maxine; Budgett, Stephanie; Arnold, Phillipa (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research on students??? understanding of experiment-to-causation inference is limited despite the randomized experiment being prevalent in high school and introductory statistics courses. Using design research we: Determined conceptual foundations, created a two-lesson learning trajectory incorporating dynamic visualization software for the randomization test, implemented the trajectory in large introductory statistics classes (n ??? 450) and a workplace class, and analyzed student data from pretests and posttests and interviews to ascertain their reasoning processes in order to inform future teaching and learning approaches. In this chapter we have mainly focused on six students to explore their reasoning processes as they moved from the observed data and randomization test to making an experiment-to-causation inference. Our findings suggested that the dynamic visualization software assisted students to recall and understand the processes underpinning the randomization test. Student inference argumentation, however, needed further development.

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  • Corporate governance and initial public offerings in China

    Chen, JJ; Gong, Xihe (2012-03-22)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A major international study on corporate governance and Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) in twenty-one countries.

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  • The language of shape

    Arnold, Phillipa; Pfannkuch, Maxine (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Students often struggle with describing the shape of different data distributions as they are distracted by the noise and do not ???see??? the signal. Their attention is drawn to the actual outline of the distribution rather than an inferred distributional shape. In this chapter, we describe part of an instructional sequence for learning about shape starting with large data distributions. The instruction was trialled in a year 10 class (age 14) and included a focus on developing the language of shape for describing distributions and identifying key features for description. Responses from pre- and post-tests are briefly discussed and a proposed framework for describing distributions is presented.

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  • Why Marriage Equality is Not Enough: Enduring Social Policy Concerns for Gender- and Sexually Diverse New Zealanders

    Fenaughty, John; Pega, F (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bounty programs in free/libre/open source software

    Krishnamurthy, S; Tripathi, Arvind (2006-10-03)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bounty programs are commonly used in FLOSS communities to motivate developers for the tasks which are not of their primary interest by providing monetary incentives. These tasks include creating new programs, improving the security of an existing software, solving a specific bug, giving product improvement suggestions, helping maintain the codebase and preparing documentation. In this paper, we describe the impact of a bounty program on a corporation, an individual developer and a project. We analyze the rational response to a bounty by applying the model in Selby Jr. and Beranek (1981).

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  • Decolonising the academy: The process of re-presenting Indigenous health in tertiary teaching and learning

    Curtis, Elana; Reid, Mary-Jane; Jones, Rhys (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Indigenous health workforce development has been identified as a key strategy to improve Indigenous health and reduce ethnic inequities in health outcomes. Likewise, development of a culturally safe and culturally competent non-Indigenous health workforce must also occur if the elimination of health inequities is to be fully realised. Tertiary education providers responsible for training health professionals must face the challenge of engaging the Indigenous learner within health sciences, exposing the ???hidden curriculum??? that undermines professional Indigenous health learning and ensuring tertiary success for Indigenous students within their academy. This chapter summarises recent developments, research and interventions within the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland that aims to address these challenges by re-presenting Indigenous student recruitment, selection and support, re-presenting bridging/foundation education and representing M??ori health teaching and learning within the curriculum.

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  • Promoting health equity

    Reid, Mary-Jane (2015-08-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    To many of us who work in health, health promotion and health equity are natural travelling companions. What could be more closely aligned than the community development and advocacy intentions of health promotion, and the social justice focus of health equity? In our work, however, we are surrounded by numerous examples where, despite our best intentions, health promotion interventions have widened health inequities. In this chapter we look closely at the relationship between health promotion and health equity. Many people reading this book will be more familiar with health promotion than health equity, and so relatively more of this chapter is spent defining, understanding and contextualising health equity. Following this introduction, we examine the challenge of undertaking health promotion while keeping health equity firmly in mind, using examples from important health promotion challenges that have been the focus of our attention during the last decades. We review how health promotion can impact health equity unintentionally and negatively, and formulate a plan for assessing health promotion activities against health equity standards. Finally, we note the changing political landscape for both health equity and health promotion, and reflect on what this means for the way we practise health promotion into the future.

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  • Using pregnant sheep to model developmental brain damage

    van den Heuij, LG; Wassink, Guido; Gunn, Alistair; Bennet, Laura (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to develop more effective ways of identifying, managing, and treating preterm asphyxial brain injury, stable experimental models are essential. The present review describes the key experimental factors that determine the pattern and severity of brain injury in chronically instrumented fetal sheep, including the depth (???severity???) and duration of asphyxia, and the maturity, and condition of the fetus. These models are valuable to dissect the pathogenesis of key clinical patterns of brain injury in a stable thermal and biochemical environment, and to test therapeutic interventions.

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  • Technological infrastructure and implementation environments: The case of laptops for New Zealand teachers.

    Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister; Harlow, Ann (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The integration of ICT is the apparent goal of range of educational initiatives worldwide. To date, however, the impact of ICTs has lagged behind the rhetoric. Rather than technology transforming teaching and learning it appears that teachers often assimilate it into existing practices. This chapter uses Douglas Engelbart’s (1992) notion of an improvement infrastructure to explore and explain the factors that have framed and shaped New Zealand teacher access to, adoption of, and resistance to the use of laptops. Engelbart posits that organizations should aspire to creating three levels of infrastructure for improvement: a core capability infrastructure, an infrastructure that enables the improvement of core work, and an infrastructure that enables the on-going improvement of the improvement processes. Improvement of improvement typically receives the least long-term strategic investment. For teachers with laptops improvement of improvement is what enables teachers to enhance their ability to use their laptop. In this chapter we show that this involves the system of teacher confidence and expertise, teacher professional development opportunities, teacher access to a reliable technological infrastructure, and the existence of a supportive school leadership and culture for ICT/laptop use.

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  • Assessment in schools – Technology education and ICT

    Jones, Alister; Cowie, Bronwen; Moreland, Judy (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    People use technology to intervene in the world to expand their possibilities, applying both intellectual and practical resources. It encompasses more than information and communication technologies (ICTs). Technology is included as a curriculum area in many countries where increasing the levels of technological literacy is seen as of intrinsic value. Effective assessment in technology, both formative and summative, needs to accommodate the multifaceted and multimodal nature of technology. ICTs have the potential to enhance classroom assessment practices through the provision of additional modes of representing, recording, and reviewing information on student learning process and products.

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  • Moving beyond deconstruction and reconstruction: Teacher knowledge as action

    Jones, Alister; Cowie, Bronwen (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Primary teachers generally have a deep knowledge of their students and a broad repertoire of pedagogical practices, particularly practices that involve teacher–student and student–student interactions, but they often lack in-depth content knowledge and have a limited repertoire of subject-specific pedagogies. This is almost always a particular issue for their teaching of science. Pedagogically appropriate teacher engagement of/with students requires teachers to have both appropriate content knowledge and knowledge of their students. In this context the idea of “knowledge in action” is central. In-depth content knowledge and subject-specific pedagogies influence teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge. Effective formative assessment or Assessment for Learning (AfL) interactions mean that teachers need rich and flexible PCK in order to undertake effective interactions with diverse groups of students. In this chapter we highlight what we mean by effective AfL interactions, teachers’ knowledges required for effective interactions and how we might enhance teachers’ knowledges to enhance the potential for student learning.

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  • Journalists in New Zealand

    Hollings, James; Lealand, Geoff (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Many of the changes in journalism in the past 10 years have global ramifications beyond their impact on journalism in a small South Pacific nation of 4 million people. Such changes include the impact of technological innovation on both workplace practice and continuing viability of the mainstream media (newspapers and magazines, in particular), intensified financial pressures on media institutions both large and small, the changing nature of audiences and their media consumption, the emergence of transparently partisan journalism, and the proliferation of quasijournalistic online news sites.

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  • Iwi, institutes, societies & community led initiatives

    Whaanga, Hēmi; Simmonds, Naomi Beth; Keegan, Te Taka Adrian Gregory (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    With the rapid evolution, innovation and incredible growth of ICT, the avenues to exchange, access, manage, create, disseminate, display and research Indigenous data and Mātauranga Māori have increased at astounding rates. This generation, often referred to as ‘digital natives', ‘homo zappiëns’, ‘Net generation’, ‘millennials’, ‘i-generation’ (see, for example Akçayır, Dündar, & Akçayır, 2016; Kirschner & De Bruyckere, 2017; Prensky, 2001; Yong & Gates, 2014), have been raised, immersed and exposed to a myriad of digital technologies, video games, computers, digital music players and cellular phones during their brief lifetimes. Technologies have dramatically transformed how each generation access, communicate, share knowledge, distribute and view information. Social networks like Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Reddit, Pinterest, Tumblr and social networking apps such as Messenger, WhatsApp, WeChat, QQ Chat, QZone, Viber, LINE, and Snapchat, with billons of active users per month, are as familiar to this generation as was the radio, television and landline telephones to the Baby Boomers who grew up with pre-cellphone mobile technology.

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  • Machine translation for te reo Māori

    Keegan, Te Taka Adrian Gregory (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    What is Machine Translation? Machine Translation (MT) is a process where computer software is used to translate texts from one natural (or spoken) language to another. Early research centred on two distinct approaches: Rules Based Machine Translation (RBMT) and Statistical Machine Translation (SMT). In simple terms RBMT makes use of large sets of linguistic rules that define languages whereas SMT uses statistical techniques to build language models from large language corpora. Increases in computing power and the amount of language corpora available has meant that SMT had become the preferred option with recent advances in neural networks also being applied to improve the accuracy of SMT. For commercial reasons, this is an area of research that has generated a lot of interest and funding support from some major international computer companies, including Google¹,Microsoft² and Facebook³. Why is Machine Translation important for te reo Māori? A te reo Māori purist may argue that it is not important to focus activities on having a machine undertake translations for te reo Māori; if people want to understand te reo Māori then they should put in the effort to learn the language. This line of reasoning is difficult to argue with. But, from a Māori language activist perspective the value of MT is not so much in the translation of te reo Māori to (say) English, but rather the translation of English to te reo Māori. If this translation can be done efficiently, with low costs, it will assist in the proliferation of te reo Māori into new contexts, new environments and will assist its normalisation in New Zealand's society. At this time, two of the major international companies, Google and Microsoft, have invested significantly in MT for te reo Māori. This paper summarises their endeavours and reports on the quality of translations they have been able to generate.

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  • "He Matapihi ki te Mana Raraunga” - Conceptualising Big Data through a Māori lens

    Hudson, Maui; Anderson, Tiriana; Dewes, Te Kuru; Temara, Pou; Whaanga, Hēmi; Roa, Tom (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Advances in computer technology and analytical processes create an environment where data becomes the raw material mined to create valuable information and insights. The idea of Big Data emerges from the collation of increasing vast amounts of data enabled by the shift towards an increasingly open data environment. How this changing context alters the relationship between Iwi/Māori collectives and their mātauranga, cultural information and data has yet to be fully explored. However, the concept of Māori Data Sovereignty, which anticipates Māori governance over Māori data, has a natural appeal. This chapter outlines some of the Māori concepts and presents a framework which may be used to inform how data and data use may be conceptualised through a Māori cultural lens.

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  • Physiology, blooms and prediction of planktonic cyanobacteria

    Oliver, Roderick L.; Hamilton, David P.; Brookes, Justin D.; Ganf, George G. (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter addresses some of the challenges associated with trying to model population fluctuations, bloom formation and collapse of planktonic cyanobacteria. It is argued that improved modelling and prediction rely on a better understanding of the physiological responses of cyanobacteria to the physical and chemical characteristics of their environment. In addition there is a need to understand better the complex trophic interactions that influence population dynamics. The high variability of cyanobacterial populations represents a major challenge for models attempting to make predictions at the whole lake scale. Many of the physiological attributes described within specific models do not capture the dynamics of cyanobacteria, because of the extensive parameterisations required by the array of descriptive algorithms. The physiological attributes to be modelled include the ability to fix nitrogen, store both nitrogen and phosphorus, capture light across a range of wavelengths with specific accessory pigments, form colonies or filaments and regulate buoyancy through the balance between gas vacuoles and cellular constituents.

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  • Effects of climate change on New Zealand Lakes

    Goldman, Charles R.; Kumagai, Michio; Robarts, Richard D.; Hamilton, David P.; McBride, Chris G.; Özkundakci, Deniz; Schallenberg, Marc; Verburg, Piet; de Winton, Mary; Kelly, David; Hendy, Chris H.; Ye, Wei (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter contains sections titled: -Introduction -Geographical and climate perspective -Historical climate -Future climate -Overview of lake types and formation processes -Climate change and impacts on endemic and exotic flora and fauna -Climate change impacts on fish -Climate change impacts on aquatic plants and macroinvertebrates -Effects of climate change on shallow NZ lakes -Effects of climate change on high-altitude NZ lakes -Case study: Lake Taupo -Case study: Lake Pupuke -Case study: surface temperature in monomictic and polymictic Rotorua lakes -Case study: bottom-water dissolved oxygen in Lake Rotoiti -Case study: modeling effects of land use and climate change for Lake Rotorua -Management challenges and mitigation measures -Conclusions -References

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  • Out of the pan and into the fire: Precariousness among women and children escaping domestic violence

    Robertson, Neville; Masters-Awatere, Bridgette (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Domestic violence can leave women in a precarious position in regards to basic needs such as health, housing and income. It can make their participation in education, social and community life extremely marginal and seriously undermine their ability to parent in the way that they would like. Women in certain tight-knit communities may be ostracised if they speak out about the violence as they get blamed for bringing shame on to the community. Drawing on information collected over a number of studies, we discuss the myriad ways in which women resist violence and attempt to keep themselves and their children safe. We outline the strategic decisions women make in the face of precarious circumstances and reveal the various ways so-called helping agencies too often fail to help. Of particular concern is the way certain state agencies act in oppressive and controlling ways, in effect holding women responsible for the violence visited upon them and their children and requiring women to jump through the hoops to prove themselves as worthy. We offer our thoughts on what is needed to support of women and their children that will enable them to flourish.

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  • New Zealand

    Rishworth, Paul (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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