1,846 results for Book item

  • James Harrington's prescription for Healing and Settling

    Scott, Jonathan (2011-07-31)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    10 James Harrington's prescription for healing and settling Jonathan Scott James Harrington's The Commonwealth of Oceana (1656) has been intermittently ...

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  • Fast Spatially Controllable Multi-dimensional Exemplar-Based Texture Synthesis and Morphing

    Manke, FS; Wuensche, Burkhard (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Texture synthesis and morphing are important techniques for efficiently creating realistic textures used in scientific and entertainment applications. In this paper we present a novel fast algorithm for multi-dimensional texture synthesis and morphing that is especially suitable for parallel architectures such as GPUs or direct volume rendering (DVR) hardware. Our proposed solution generalizes the synthesis process to support higher than three-dimensional synthesis and morphing. We introduce several improvements to previous 2D synthesis algorithms, such as new appearance space attributes and an improved jitter function. We then modify the synthesis algorithm to use it for texture morphing which can be applied to arbitrary many 2D input textures and can be spatially controlled using weight maps. Our results suggest that the algorithm produces higher quality textures than alternative algorithms with similar speed. Compared to higher quality texture synthesis algorithms, our solution is considerably faster and allows the synthesis of additional channels, such as transparencies and displacement maps, without affecting the running time of the synthesis at all. The method is easily extended to allow fast 3D synthesis and we show several novel examples and applications for morphed solid 3D textures. Overall the presented technique provides an excellent trade-off between speed and quality, is highly flexible, allows the use of arbitrary channels, can be extended to arbitrary dimensions, is suitable for a GPU-implementation, and can be effectively integrated into rendering frameworks such as DVR tools.

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  • Resisting American Psychiatry: French Opposition to DSM-III, Biological Reductionism, and the Pharmaceutical Ethos

    Vallee, Manuel (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter has two central purposes. The first is to suggest that western, as well as non-western, illness categories are culture bound. The second is to elucidate the diagnostic and treatment implications associated with adopting a reductionistic diagnostic approach, including for psychiatric as well as nonpsychiatric illnesses. A comparative approach is used to highlight the differences between American psychiatry's diagnostic system (i.e., DSM) and French child psychiatry's diagnostic system (CFTMEA). The analysis begins by identifying the overarching differences between the systems, then analyzes the differences between their respective versions of the Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder diagnostic category, and ends by tracing the diagnostic and treatment implications of those differences. This analysis reveals that the systems differ in three significant ways: (1) theoretical orientation (biological vs. psychodynamic), (2) the view that symptoms should be counted as opposed to understood, and (3) the presence of symptom checklists versus their absence. Additionally, these differences encourage American clinicians to both administer the ADHD diagnosis to a greater number of symptomatic children and to treat these children with psychiatric medications. The analysis makes three contributions to the field: (1) the comparative analysis highlights the limitations of the DSM's ADHD definition; (2) it strengthens the case for seeing western diagnostic categories in general, and the DSM categories in particular, as cultural artifacts; (3) it elucidates the profound relationship between diagnostic systems and both diagnostic rates and treatment practices

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  • Thailand's and Malaysia's Cross-Regional FTA Initiatives

    Hoadley, John (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cave Ecosystems

    Simon, Kevin (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cave ecosystems are characterized by lack oflight and, as a result, dependence on connectivity to the surface or internal microbial production for energy supply. Caves are actually part of a larger karst ecosystem that is the entire drainage basin through which moves water, energy and matter. Within these karst ecosystems lie a diversity of habitats and organisms that can differ substantially, yet are highly interconnected and interdependent. While often thought of as stable, karst ecosystems are extremely dynamic and subject to natural and human-imposed disturbance.

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  • Painful exclusion: Hepatitis C in the New Zealand Hemophilia Community

    Park, Juliet (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Evolutionary Explanation and the Record of Interest: Using Evolutionary Archaeology and Dual-Inheritance Theory to Explain the Archaeological Record

    Cochrane, Ethan (2009-03)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Literacy for Schooling: Two-Tiered Scaffolding for Learning and Teaching

    Wilkinson,, IAG; Gaffney, Janet (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter provides a theoretical analysis of research on professional development and literacy interventions in grades K-12. Two-tiered scaffolding (Gaffney & Anderson, 1991), in which tier 1 represents teacher-child interaction and tier 2 represents professional development provider-teacher interaction, served as the theoretical framework for the search, analysis, and interpretation of empirical studies. The theoretical critique afforded a nuanced analysis with resulting novel insights into the relationship between professional development and the impact of literacy interventions. Studies are organized in terms of four contexts for literacy learning (one-to-one, small-group, whole-class, and school-wide interventions) and rated in terms of strength of evidence of the impact of professional development or support on student learning. We provide a critique of the research from a two-tiered scaffolding perspective and conclude with implications for research, theory, policy, and practice.

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  • The STEM revolution: What place for languages other than English?

    East, Martin; Tolosa Izquierdo, Constanza (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Barefruit Products: A case of entrepreneurial failure in the UK agri-food sector -- United Kingdom

    Swail, Janine (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cope (2011) states that 'failure represents one of the most difficult, complex and yet valuable learning experiences that entrepreneurs will ever have the (mis)fortune to engage in' (p. 620). Thus, venture failure is an important concept to understand in entrepreneurship, both in terms of its causes and consequences for the individual entrepreneur, organisations and society at large. Consequently, the aim of this teaching case is to bring to life, the often untold story of entrepreneurial failure to advance students' understanding of the entrepreneurial learning process.

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  • Gap Junctions Regulate Seizure Activity - But in Unexpected Ways

    Voss, LJ; Sleigh, James (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Seizures are a poorly understood neurophysiological state epitomized by hypersynchronous excitatory brain activity. This chapter will explore the experimental and theoretical basis for the involvement of gap junctions in the generation of seizure activity. Interest in this subject has been driven by the idea that direct electrical communication between neurons (via open gap junctions) ought to promote hypersynchronous activity because of the rapid propagation of electrical activity between linked cells. A full understanding of this topic, however, rests upon an appreciation of the cell-specific distribution of gap junction subtypes across different brain networks. Of particular relevance are gap junction-linked astrocytic, inhibitory interneuronal and excitatory pyramidal cell networks. Research delineating the respective roles of each is in its infancy, but clues from recent experimental and theoretical mathematical modeling studies provide a solid foundation from which to explore this topic.

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  • Distributing leadership to improve outcomes for students

    Timperley, Helen (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Empirical work on how readership is distributed more and less successfully in schools is rare. This chapter presents a case for distributing leadership in particular ways that can have positive outcomes for studeits in a schoor improvement context in which varying success was evident. Grounding the theory in this practice context led to the identffication of some risks and benefits of distributing leadership and to the chailenge of io*e key concepts presented in eailier theorizing about readership ani ni alstaauilon. concepts related to distributed leadership discussed in the chapter include embedding vision in activities and the social distributio, oi task enactment' Issues addressed within the latter concept include boundary spanning relationships between leaders and followers and the use of artefacts.

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  • Markerless Augmented Reality for Robotic Helicoptor Applications

    Chen, Ian; MacDonald, Bruce; Wuensche, Burkhard (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The objective of this research is to apply markerless Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to aid in the visualisation of robotic helicopter related tasks. Conventional robotic AR applications work well with markers in prepared environments but are infeasible in outdoor settings. In this paper, we present preliminary results from a real time markerless AR system for tracking natural features in an agricultural scene. By constructing a virtual marker under a known initial con???guration of the robotic helicopter, camera and the ground plane, the camera pose can be continuously tracked using the natural features from the image sequence to perform augmentation of virtual objects. The experiments are simulated on a mock-up model of an agricultural farm and the results show that the current AR system is capable of tracking the camera pose accurately for translational motions and roll rotations. Future work includes reducing jitter in the virtual marker vertices to improve camera pose estimation accuracy for pitch and yaw rotations, and implementing feature recovery algorithms.

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  • Sidebar - programming commercial robots

    Canas, JM; Matellan, V; MacDonald, Bruce; Biggs, Geoffrey (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lozano???P??erez [LP82] divided robot programming into methods for guiding, robot???level programming, and task???level programming. A more useful distinction for modern methods is between manual programming and automatic programming, based on the actual method used for programming as this is the crucial distinction for users and programmers

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  • Trends in robot software domain engineering

    Brugali, D; Agah, A; MacDonald, Bruce; Nesnas, I; Smart, WD (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Domain Engineering is a set of activities aiming at developing reusable artifacts within a domain. The term domain is used to denote or group a set of systems or functional areas within systems, that exhibit similar functionality.

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  • The goals of human resource management

    Boxall, Peter (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction Human resource management covers a vast array of activities and shows a huge range of variations across occupations, organizational levels, business units, firms, industries, and societies. This confusing detail and profound diversity naturally begs a fundamental question: what are employers seeking through engaging in HRM and how do their goals for HRM relate to their broader business goals? The question that drives this chapter is not about the reasons for individual HR policies and practices, important though they may be, but about the underpinning objectives of employers. In terms of the ???level of analysis??? involved, the focus is on goals that characterize whole employing units: that is, firms or, where these are diversified and devolved in labor management, business units, or establishments within them. This unit of analysis should not, however, be seen as implying that firms are somehow isolated islands. The chapter will lay emphasis on the fact that employer goals are inevitably affected by the sectoral and societal contexts within which firms operate.

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  • High-performance work systems and employee well-being in New Zealand

    Boxall, Peter; Macky, K (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is a long tradition of interest in how to enhance worker motivation and raise organisational productivity through improving the design of work. The human relations movement, and such concepts as socio-technical work systems, industrial democracy, and job enrichment, have all had their day in the sun. ...

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  • Human capital, HR strategy and organizational effectiveness

    Boxall, Peter (2011)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Abstract: Introduction ??? Basic Premises: Human Capital, Organizational Viability, and Superior Performance ??? What Makes the Management of Human Capital Problematic? ??? Why do Firms' Investments in Human Capital Vary across Critical Contexts? ??? When and How can Firms Build Sustained Competitive Advantage through Human Capital? ??? Conclusions

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  • Human resource management: scope, analysis, and significance

    Boxall, Peter; Purcell, J; Wright, P (2007)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Abstract: The Scope of HRM: Three Major Subfields ??? Analytical HRM: Three Key Characteristics ??? On the Offensive: The Significance of HRM ??? The Handbook of Human Resource Management: Design and Contributions

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  • Reframing teacher professional learning: an alternative policy approach to strengthening valued outcomes for diverse learners

    Timperley, Helen; Alton-Lee, A (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter engages in the debate about what counts as professional knowledge from the perspective of improving outcomes for diverse learners. We begin by highlighting the importance of assumptions about appropriate roles for teachers and how those assumptions have shaped the debate about what teachers need to know. Then we consider some myths and evidence about teacher agency that have contributed to a recent international shift in policy attention to the importance of teacher knowledge and, more particularly, how to develop teacher agency and capability. The main focus of the chapter is on a policy approach to building a multidisciplinary evidence base in education that both identifies the kinds of teacher knowledge that has a positive impact on a range of student outcomes and, at the same time, develops that knowledge through a national collaborative knowledge-building and knowledge-use strategy. The approach described is the New Zealand Iterative Best Evidence Synthesis (BES) Programme, which deliberately and systematically draws on and develops a rich multidisciplinary knowledge base in education. We situate our account of this program within (a) a comparison of a range of international policy approaches to strengthening the evidence base informing what teachers need to know, (b) a vision of the role of teaching as responsive to diverse learners and the evolving challenges of the 21st century, and (c) a touchstone of effectiveness as defined by impacts on a range of valued learner outcomes. We present the findings of a new synthesis of the evidence from 97 empirical studies that identify the development of the kinds of teacher knowledge that have a demonstrated positive impact on outcomes for diverse learners. The findings of the synthesis are exemplified through an in-depth case study of effective professional development designed to support student learning, teacher learning, teacher-educator research, and policy learning.

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