1,995 results for Book item

  • A Holistic Approach to Embedding Information Literacy in the Design, Delivery, and Assessment of an Undergraduate Business Programme

    Carrie, Douglas; Mitchell, LM (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Human Rights Obligations in the Private Sector: Reflection on YL v Birmingham City Council and the Meaning of "Public Function"

    Rishworth, Paul (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • On the Use of Stochastic Complexity in Spectral Analysis of Radial Velocity Data

    Forsell, V; Giurcaneanu, Ciprian (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The periodogram and its variants have been extensively used in the past for estimating the power spectral density. In this book chapter, we consider the case when the measurements are not equidistantly spaced on the time-axis, and we focus on testing the significance of the periodogram peaks. Because it is known that the standard tests of hypothesis testing are not suitable for this problem, we propose the use of Stochastic Complexity (SC). The performance of SC is evaluated in comparison with the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC), which has been employed in the previous literature to solve the same problem. The numerical experiments on radial velocity measurements demonstrate that SC compares favorably with BIC.

    View record details
  • Honey Production and Compositional Parameters

    Stephens, JM; Greenwood, David; Fearnley, L; Bong, J; Schlothauer, RC; Loomes, Kerry (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Manuka honey is produced from the nectar of Leptospermum scoparium and is of high therapeutic and commercial value due to its non-peroxide antibacterial activity, known as unique Manuka factor (UMF). These properties are attributable to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO), which is derived from the precursor molecule dihydroxyacetone (DHA) present in the plant nectar, and potentially other components such as phenolic compounds. Despite the therapeutic importance of Manuka honey, relatively little is known about how its molecular composition and the MGO concentration are affected by aging and storage conditions. Here we describe findings using mass spectrometry showing that honey contains a diverse array of small-molecule compounds and that these vary depending on floral origin and storage conditions. We also describe how MGO levels change as Manuka honey matures as well as other components that might be useful as floral markers of this honey.

    View record details
  • The art of playing

    Bishop, Thomas (2013-02-28)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Ethics of Predictive Risk Modelling

    Dare, Tim (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The early and accurate assessment of the likelihood that a child will be the victim of maltreatment in the future promises obvious benefits. Recent research suggests that predictive risk models ??? automated tools that gather and process information held in existing data sets in order to determine patterns and predict future outcomes ??? go at least some way toward making such assessments possible. However the application of predictive risk modelling to child maltreatment brings ethical risks and costs, including the possible stigmatisation of already vulnerable populations, predictable false positives, the use of data without consent, difficulties in designing and implementing effective interventions, and resource allocation issues. Not surprisingly predictive tools have been treated with suspicion in the child welfare area.1 This paper takes a predictive risk model developed in New Zealand as its focus and attempts to identify and respond to at least some of the ethical risks associated with the use of PRM in child protection, suggesting that the ethical costs associated with such modelling can be addressed or ameliorated or are outweighed by its potential benefits.

    View record details
  • Comparing Two Software Design Process Theories

    Ralph, David Paul (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper explores an ongoing conflict concerning the nature of software design. This conflict manifests itself as antagonism between managers and developers, debates about agile vs. plan-driven methodologies and aspiring developers??? dissatisfaction with their courses. One side views design as a plan-driven information processing task involving rational decision-making (the Reason-Centric Perspective), while the other views design as an improvised, creative task involving naturalized decision-making (Action-Centric Perspective). Each perspective includes an epistemology, theory of human action and a software design process theory (an explanation of how software is created in practice). This paper reports the results of an exploratory questionnaire study that comparatively and empirically evaluated the two process theories. Results clearly favor the Action-Centric process theory: the Sensemaking-Coevolution-Implementation Framework.

    View record details
  • New Learning for New Students

    Hope, John (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    When the post-world war two ???baby boomer' generation reached school age, education changed. Massive increases in student numbers required changes to teacher education, enormous investment in new schools and changes in pedagogy. Each succeeding generation has been different, and of necessity, education has changed to reflect the needs and aspirations of the new generation. Generation Y students are now in higher education, the first Generation Z students will soon be entering higher education. Both groups are showing signs of being different to their seniors. This difference implies changes to higher education learning. Compounding the need for Generation Y and Generation Z instigated changes to higher education has been the rapid onset of new forms of technologically infused learning, some generated by an industry desperate to maintain its influence on education as the market for paper-based books and journals declines, others generated by the ubiquitous nature of everyday life technological innovations such as social media, and more recently, the widespread availability of tuition fee-free MOOCS. This chapter will chart the generational and technological changes that are likely to increasingly demand changes to learning in schooling and higher education. Possible future change scenarios are also suggested.

    View record details
  • Vegetative Branching in Petunia

    Drummond, Revel; Ledger, SE; Simons, Joanne; Janssen, BJ; Snowden, KC (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Plant form is established by the response of the plant to endogenous and environmental cues. One architectural process for which genetic components have been identified is the decision for axillary buds to grow. In Petunia, a number of genes involved in the decision to branch have been identified and aspects of their functions are elucidated. The genes altered in the dad mutants appear to be involved in a single pathway that controls branching and to interact with auxin and cytokinins. These genes mediate the production and reception of hormones inducing and suppressing bud outgrowth. Among species there is a high degree of gene conservation in the pathway and the similarities and differences in gene functions have shown the power of using multiple plant systems. The understanding of developmental processes allows controlled modifications to be made, and the continuing research into axillary bud fate will have a significant impact on future improvements to crop species.

    View record details
  • The Corporatization of Health Education Curricula: ???Part of the Solution??? to Childhood Obesity?

    Powell, Darren (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Alimenta????o e Nutri????o de Povos Ind??genas Brasileiros (Food and Nutrition of Brazilian Indigenous Peoples)

    de Castro, TG; da Silva Mazzeti, CM; Mazzucchetti, L; Gimeno, SGA (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Student self-assessment

    Brown, Gavin; Harris, LR (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Could educational technology replace traditional schools in the future?

    Hope, John (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter begins by quoting Professor Wilcox noting that little had changed in schooling over the past 500 years. This chapter provides examples of how the world has changed due to globalisation and e-learning becoming mainstream, the changing needs and aspirations of the current generation of learners and the rapid development of new technologies to assist learning. All of the examples quoted suggest that traditional face-to-face schooling will change. The economic and social survival of nations depends on the quality of education of its people so some form of compulsory schooling will be needed, be it virtual or not.

    View record details
  • Designing literacy education as modes of meaning in globalised and situated contexts: Towards a restoration of the self through embodied knowing

    Thwaites, Trevor (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The world of the twenty-first century is one that presents humans with diverse forms of identity, loyalty, and sense of place. The nation state appears all but redundant in this time of transnationalism and transculturalism, as ongoing migrations and re-affirmations of identity produce transient loyalties which make policy development problematic in areas such as education. The new empire is a global one, reflecting corporate economic ambition and territorial expansion???a type of colonisation by capitalist interests that we might call ???globalisation???. Associated with this global empire are the new technologies of trading and communication which have produced new societal structures, such as social networks, that display various formations of information and cultural amateurs who promote themselves through the voyeuristic possibilities of the World Wide Web. The preparation of students for their life in these scenarios has been guided by governments and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), convinced that the future lies in a vaporous ambition called the ???knowledge-economy??????a further complication for education policy. Where does that leave the self as an identity requiring forms of efficacy, personal ambition, and a sense of being-in-a-physical-world? This paper explores one facet of this question which is linked both to concepts of literacy and to the embodied self as one way of demonstrating that there are strategies for responding to the new environment. This way suggests giving agency to learners through a radical and embodied means of constructing knowledge and literacy that seeks to retain the humanness in schooling and which potentially empowers learners through the possibilities opened up by these ???new??? pedagogies.

    View record details
  • Planning with high expectations

    Davies, Christine; McDonald, Lynette; Flint, Annaline (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Social Entrepreneurship as an INGO: Exploring the Challenges of Innovation and Hybridisation

    Newth, Jamie (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    International non-governmental organizations are an under-researched context in entrepreneurship studies given the level of resources they mobilize for social value creation and the strategic threats they are currently facing. Shepherd and Patzelt???s (2011) sustainable entrepreneurship framework outlines the entrepreneurship opportunities that these organizations have available as a response to shifting aid policies, evolving donor expectations, the rise of the social enterprise and impact investment, and the changing humanitarian development landscape. However, the established institutional logic of such organizations can inhibit their ability to pursue innovative social entrepreneurship initiatives. This chapter explores, via a long-term qualtitative investigation, the hybridization of a large INGO as it attempts such initiatives. The key findings are that the points of tension in effectively blending institutional logics ??? hybridizing ??? lay in the organization???s financial and institutional compliance, risk appetite, business model, value proposition, and governance. Contributions are made through the empirical application of Shepherd and Patzelt???s (2011) framework and its combination with the theory of institutional logics.

    View record details
  • Expatriate selection: A historical overview and criteria for decision-making

    Ott, Dana; Michailova, Snejina (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose: The International Human Resource Management literature has paid less attention to the selection of expatriates and the decision-making criteria with regard to such selection, than to issues relating to expatriates' role, performance, adjustment, success, and failure. Yet, before expatriates commence their assignments, they need to be selected. The purpose of this book chapter is to provide an overview of issues related specifically to expatriate selection. In particular, the chapter traces the chronological development of selection over the last five decades or so, from prior to 1970 until present. The chapter subsequently identifies five expatriate selection criteria that have been applied in regard to traditional international assignments, but are also relevant to alternative assignments. Methodology/approach: We begin by reviewing expatriate selection historically and its position within expatriate management based on changing business environments. Then, drawing from over five decades of literature on international assignments, we identify and discuss five organizational, individual, and contextual level criteria for selecting expatriates. Findings: Emphasis on different issues tends to characterize expatriate selection during the various decades since the literature has taken up the topic. The chapter describes those issues, following a chronological perspective. In addition, the chapter organizes the various selection criteria in five clusters: organization philosophy, technical competence, relational abilities, personal characteristics, and spouse and family situation. Research limitations and practical implications: While there are studies on expatriate selection, there is more to be understood with regard to the topic. Provided all other expatriation phases are subsequent, if selection is not understood in detail, the foundations of studying phases and processes that take place once expatriates are selected may not be sound. While the scholarly conversations of other expatriate-related issues should continue, the international human resource management literature can absorb more analyses on selection. A better understanding of expatriate selection will assist its better management. The chapter provides a basis for human resource management professionals to be able to map the various criteria for selection, and decide, under particular circumstances, which ones to prioritize and why. Originality/value: The chapter brings clarity to a topic that has remained less researched when compared to other areas of interest related to expatriates and their international assignments by tracing the historical development of this important phase of the expatriation process. In addition, the chapter organizes a number of selection criteria along five core areas and discusses each of them to gain insights that help explain expatriate selection in greater detail.

    View record details
  • Benthic habitat mapping

    Lamarche, Geoffroy; Orpin, AR; Mitchell, JS; Pallentin, A (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Making deep-sea benthic habitat maps requires expensive and complex technologies to acquire, process and interpret remotely-sensed data. Recent technologies that have advanced the field significantly include side-scan sonar, multibeam echosounders, and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles. Acquisition of bathymetric and backscatter data using these tools underpins modern habitat mapping, but requires carefully considered survey strategies and end-product development. Practical issues such as launch and recovery operations, navigation, accuracy and acquisition of additional data are highly dependent on the type of equipment used and can affect data quality. Processing of bathymetry and backscatter data can yield quantitative information about the seafloor, which in turn may be used as proxies to characterise the habitat. Data for proxies such as bathymetry, slope, rugosity or reflectivity can be partitioned into multiple segments with similar multivariate values (segmentation), which can be further grouped spatially to form a connected region of similar habitat (classification). Finally, the acquisition of ground-truthing data is critical to validate any benthic habitat map generated using such means. We illustrate the application of habitat mapping methodologies through examples selected primarily from studies conducted within the New Zealand region.

    View record details
  • National and ethnic minorities: Language rights and recognition

    May, Stephen (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In an increasingly globalized world, marked by transmigration, transnationalism, and the apparent porosity of national borders, debates over what constitutes (ongoing) citizenship in modern nation- states have become increasingly contested. What rights and responsibilities ensue for national citizens in this late modern, globalized age? How should nation-states respond to rapidly changing demographic patterns that reflect the rise of what Vertovec (2007) has termed ???superdiversity??? ??? the rapid ethnic and linguistic diversification of constituent national populations via migration and transmigration, particularly in major urban areas? What distinct entitlements (if any) might be accorded existing minority populations in these territories ??? that is, those groups who have long been associated historically with a particular territory but who, as a result of colonization, confederation, or conquest (or some combination of all three), now find themselves socially and politically marginalized? These broad groups are most often described as ???national minorities??? (Kymlicka 1995) and include within them the distinct subset of indigenous peoples (Xanthaki 2007; May 2012a). And what of ethnic minorities ??? those who have migrated to a new country and/or have been the subject of forced relocation? Do their histories of recent migration afford them any rights or recognition beyond the usual national imperatives of cultural and linguistic assimilation?

    View record details
  • Compulsory Acquisition and Compensation

    Palmer, Kenneth (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The law relating to the acquisition of property under the Public Works Act 1991 (NZ), requirements under the RMA, assessment of compensation, offer-back obligations.

    View record details