7 results for Book review

  • Book review: 'Parliament's library: 150 years'

    Cossham, A. F. (2008)

    Book review
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Culture on tour: Ethnographies of travel [book review].

    Jamieson, K. (2006)

    Book review
    Open Polytechnic

    Culture on tour, the recent book by reputed anthropologist (also celebrant and critic) of ethnography and tourism, Edward Bruner, realises the aim of his work in general: to �write tourism as others have written culture� (p. 10). Indeed, Bruner takes tourism seriously. He analyses tourist performances as social practices to be �studied in their own right� and not as simulacra of other supposedly more �real� or valid phenomena (p. 7). The book presents a collection of Bruner�s best-known work over the last 15 years of his prolific ethnographic fieldwork career in parts of Africa, Indonesia, the USA and the Middle East.

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  • Review of the book U-Turn: Putting you back into your relationship.

    Jarden, A. (2006)

    Book review
    Open Polytechnic

    The article reviews the book "U-Turn: Putting You Back Into Your Relationship," by John Aiken.

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  • Review of the book From Sextants to Satellites: a cartographic timeline for New Zealand, by Brian Marshall

    Leaming, Elva (2006)

    Book review
    The University of Auckland Library

    Why a time line for New Zealand cartography? It was a serendipitous idea. The project initially began when the author, Map Librarian at the University of Auckland, was approached by a biological scientist, over the compilation of a chronological listing of events and explorations that had impacted on New Zealand's botanical studies. The daunting task became increasingly detailed, and the author eventually saw the framework of a cartographic time line taking shape. So began this work, which for the delving reader, is as much an entertaining past-time read as it is an important reference work. Maps tell a story in the briefest possible form. This timeline is therefore an organized summary of a far larger story; one of adventure, practical input, hard labour and artistic skill, all which have greatly contributed to the historical mapping of New Zealand and its development as a nation.

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  • Review of Tony Fitzpatrick, New Theories of Welfare

    Cotterell, Gerard (2008)

    Book review
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Fitzpatrick’s latest book complements his earlier work Welfare Theory: An Introduction (2001), in which Fitzpatrick focused on what he called “classic” theories of welfare, while his latest book provides an overview of contemporary approaches to welfare theory – theoretical developments post-1990. Fitzpatrick notes that these two books overlap only in covering reciprocity, altruism and class. This speaks to the ongoing centrality of these issues in the welfare policy arena.

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  • Review of the book Harold Wellman: A man who moved New Zealand, by Simon Nathan

    Leaming, Elva (2006)

    Book review
    The University of Auckland Library

    Simon Nathan's excellent title clearly states what his book is about; the life story of Harold William Wellman (1909-99), a man passionate about discovering how movements of the earth's crust make New Zealand's geology unique.

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  • Review of John W. Hughes, Major Douglas: The Policy of a Philosophy

    Winter, Stephen (2007)

    Book review
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. As the back cover of Hughes’s book tells us, the Social Credit movement was once a social force. Garnering substantial political and academic attention under the slogan “Dividends for All!”, this early supply-side movement obtained a following throughout the British Empire. Major Douglas: the Policy of a Philosophy explores the Social Credit movement, which started in the early 1920s, with some attention to economic theory but a greater emphasis on the movement’s social and political impact.

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