122 results for Conference item, 1990

  • French media cultural policy and media integration: From national to European?

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia (1999)

    Conference item
    Unitec

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  • Evaluation - Measuring your performance to plan & evaluate the effectiveness of your measurement tools

    Beechey, John (1999)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Performance measurement and management is one of the most significant developments in the sphere of people management. Within organisations, it has become a key business process. It is viewed as a major lever for achieving the culture .change needed to enable organisations to respond to the challenges of the business environment of the 1990s. Performance measurement and management is a set of processes for developing a shared understanding among employees of what needs to be done to enable an organisation to achieve its strategic goals. These processes include developing appropriate performance measures, and managing and developing people using approaches that are likely to produce continued success. Performance measurement and management is about the "how” as well as the "what" of performance. It is not about "quick fixes" and "panaceas”. It is about developing a culture of confidence and trust among all employees, which reinforces both team and individual achievement. Success stems from demonstrable commitment from the organisation's senior level and from investment - of time and resources - into developing and training employees to deliver good performance. Most organisations have some sort of process or framework to help measure and manage the performance of their employees. There is a growing awareness of the need to move away from the retrospective top-down annual appraisals to a forward-looking and two-way approach to communicating objectives, and so delivering performance for the business by valuing the contribution of all staff irrespective of status or job title. The design of any performance measurement system should reflect the basic operating assumption of the organisations it supports. If the organisation changes and the measurement system doesn't, the latter will be at least ineffective or, more likely, counter productive. Traditional measurement systems tell an organisation where it stands in its efforts to achieve goals but not how it got there or, even more important, what it should do differently. The challenge is to raise awareness of, and encourage dialogue about, performance as part of the daily business of an organisation. It is a matter not of only defining, measuring and managing performance, but of planning development activity and developing problem solving approaches to meet objectives. This approach relies on the ability of all employees to work as a team to common objectives and with a common sense of ownership and success.

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  • The development of a flexible learning mode for the final year of the Bachelor of Construction

    Birchmore, Roger (1998-10)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper describes the conversion of a conventional Lecture/Tutorial delivery mode of a final year Construction degree, to a mode comprising short, intensive blocks of Campus based delivery separated by long periods of student directed study. The driving forces behind the conversion are discussed. The developmental procedures are described and an outline of the delivery format is presented. The potential advantages and disadvantages are considered from the student and the deliverers' perspectives. Experiences of delivering the course are given.

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  • The next fifty years: Eco-cyborg Chandigarh

    Bogunovich, Dushko (1999-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    There are good and bad things about Le Corbusier's plans and designs for Chandigarh. As we face the environmental and social uncertainties of the 21st century, it may be more productive to focus at the good things. The good things are; a well-intended utopian social vision, trust in the power of technology to make life better on mass scale, an understanding of the critical relationship between human and environmental health, and faith in the capacity of good design and planning to bring all these together. The paper proposes, that 50 years later, Chandigarh - and Indian urbanism altogether - need vision and optimism more than ever. Urban problems in India are somewhat different in nature, and certainly larger in scale. The issue of ecological sustainability of cities is pressing at all levels - Chandigarh, India. world. Urban sustainability is bound to become one of the key planetary issues in the next century. The encouraging side of this prospect is that the knowledge and the technological means to deal with urban ecology are abundant. There is hardly a better place in all of India than the existing Corbusian matrix of Chandigarh to start a pilot project on ecologically sound urban development. Corb's model of the city as a machine, just as his analogy with human organism, may be obsolete and crude, but they are not totally misplaced. The latest in the theory of sustainable urban development suggests that cities should indeed be viewed as organisms, with their metabolism integrated with the surrounding ecosystem. The latest in design theory suggests that architecture, and technology in general, are moving towards artificially intelligent and ecologically benign solutions. Cities of the 21st century will be neither machines, nor organisms, They will be ecologically friendly cyborgs. The urban eco-cyborg idea implies not only the mix of the electronic (digital) with the organic (biological), but also a peculiar mix of high-tech with low-tech. The India that is nearing year 2000 has both. Here lies another great historical chance for Chandigarh.

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  • The mental health service needs of the Deaf and the development of a National Plan

    Bridgman, Geoff; McPherson, Brent (1998-10)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Issues surrounding the mental health of Deaf people receive little attention from practitioners in mental health services. International studies have shown that Deaf people are vulnerable to misdiagnosis of mental illness, denial of services and inappropriate services. In particular mental health services are unwilling or unable to recognise the relationship between Deaf culture and language and the delivery of adequate mental health promotion, and prevention and treatment of mental illness in the Deaf population. At present, most Deaf clients requiring mental health services only have access to those services provided by hearing professionals, the majority of whom have only superficial knowledge of Deaf culture, New Zealand Sign Language and the dynamics of the Deaf community. In Auckland and Northland, there are no qualified Deaf mental health professionals to deal with major illness such as schizophrenia, depression, and substance abuse and personality disorders within the Deaf community.

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  • The reality gap: How to bridge the gap between students’ expectations and lecturers’ information technology delivery skills

    Malcolm, Pam; Sherry, Carol (1998-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Courses offered on the Web, multimedia presentations, listservs - these are some of the opportunities that are being offered in education throughout the world. Students in the Department of Accountancy Law and Finance at UNITEC were asked what they expect from information technology to enhance the way that their courses are being delivered. Lecturers were invited to describe what teaching tools they are currently using and what they plan to use in the near future. It was expected that students' expectations would be greater than what is currently being provided. The aim of this research was to discover if a gap exists and if so, to make some recommendations as to how the gap could be narrowed.

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  • The tale of the patient, the son and the nurse

    Niven, Elizabeth (1997-12)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    I am a doctoral student in the Department of Nursing and Midwifery at the Albany Campus of Massey University. My study looks at the individual and composite experience of those sharing a dying. I am interviewing the dying person (the Patient), the person most close to the patient at this time of his life (the Son) and the palliative care nurse providing and facilitating care for them.

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  • Making the most of a franchised degree agreement

    Rainsbury, Liz; Hopkins, Laura (1998)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    In 1997 a franchise agreement was confirmed between Eastern Institute of Technology (EIT) and UNITEC Institute of Technology (UNITEC) for specific Bachelor of Business Studies (BBS) majors to be offered at the EIT Hawke 's Bay campus. The key outcome of the agreement was that EIT students would graduate with a UNITEC BBS degree and this therefore required consistency in delivery and quality of the programme. This paper outlines how the BBS degree Programme Committee has implemented the agreement in order to achieve this outcome and meet its statutory obligations. The paper highlights the importance of defining within the contract the role of each of the parties in terms of the junctions of the Programme Committee as set down in the Academic Statute. It also compares the quality systems of the two institutions and identifies the situations when each system should operate. The delivery of the courses at the two sites posed a range of operational issues to be addressed and these are also discussed. As with any contract some practical implications are not always foreseen - this contract was no exception! Potential and actual problem areas are identified and suggested improvements which could be applied to similar arrangements or where delivery occurs at satellite campuses are provided.

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  • Qualitative research in rheumatology: A personal perspective

    Roy, Dianne (1998)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    As the title suggests, today's presentation draws on my personal experience of using qualitative research in rheumatology. However there is more than one 'personal perspective' woven through my presentation. I will also draw on the personal experiences of a number of people who live with chronic rheumatoid arthritis. Two years ago at the NZHPR conference here in Rotorua I presented a paper entitled "Exploring the realities: the lived experience of chronic rheumatoid arthritis". The paper was based on a single participant phenomenological case study I had undertaken in 1995. Today's presentation builds on this work, and is drawn from my current research study that explores the question "what is the nature of the phenomenon living with chronic rheumatoid arthritis?"

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  • Ethical issues with the elderly: A paper presented to the First National Gerontology Conference for Nurses

    Niven, Elizabeth (1998-08)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Ethical issues in relation to elderly people are many and complex. Resource issues, competency, treatment issues are all problematic. In this short time, I need to focus my information, and so I have chosen three issues. The first two I will merely introduce, and the third I will spend a little more time discussing.

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  • Developing an on-line course

    Malcolm, Pam (1998)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The UNITEC Directorate appreciates the need to create quality on-line courses. In February 1998 the Directorate approved the development of on-line courses. During 1997 a Faculty of Business working party had formatted a method of selecting which courses could be developed during 1998. One of the courses selected was Bachelor of Business Studies 04.410 Information Systems Principles. This discussion paper identifies how the selection of courses was made by the working party. The paper then traces the development steps in producing a course that can be accessed by students from the UNITEC site and from outside UNITEC. The paper examines how the structure of the course was altered to incorporate on-line delivery, issues of technical support for staff and students and administrative matters that had to be considered. This paper will offer advice to lecturers who are contemplating the leap to on-line education.

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  • Learning contracts and self-evaluation

    Napan, Ksenija (1998-10)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper focuses on possible ways of improving student motivation and methods of assessment at tertiary level. It also addresses the need for integration of theory, practice and experience in the teaching/learning process in order to produce change in knowledge, skills, attitudes and values. Learning contracts and self-evaluation are explored in the framework of adult learning and guidelines for their effective application are presented.

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  • The Code of Social and Family Responsibility: Voyaging across the knowledge gap?

    Williams, Jocelyn; Sligo, Frank (1998-12)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    In February 1998 the NZ Government posted to all households a public discussion document entitled "Towards a Code of Social and Family Responsibility". Amid substantial controversy in the media, the public was invited to return a response form to a Response Analysis Team in the Department of Social Welfare, with comments on the 11 issues contained in the discussion document. A response rate of 10% was hoped for and received according to DSW figures. At the time of writing, a report summarising the findings of the RAT has yet to be released. In this paper we report on results from a random telephone survey conducted in May of a little under 1000 households in Auckland and Palmerston North. The survey assessed how many respondents had received, read, discussed and responded to the issues in the discussion document, and explored their responses to the Government's initiative with such questions as: is this a good way or a poor way to find out community views? Is this a good use or a poor use of public money? Has the Discussion Document encouraged you to think about your own personal family responsibilities? We were interested to discover whether the Government's exercise in communicating and consulting with the public had resulted in a representative response. Key findings to be presented and discussed include the surprising rates of delivery failure in both the metropolitan and provincial cities; the higher rate of response to the DSW from provincial residents; and the more limited access to the discussion document of the young and the urban poor. These findings suggest that the DSW Response Analysis Team has analysed a skewed representation of NZ public opinion. We also explore the proposition based in Knowledge Gap Hypothesis literature that in any community there are people who are information rich and information poor; in our data we see a manifestation of this in distinct differences between those people who did return a response form and those who did not. However knowledge gaps related to socioeconomic factors did not necessarily occur in this study, unlike in several overseas precedents; we analyse possible reasons.

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  • School self-review: The case of a secondary school senior management team

    Cardno, Carol (1998-12)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper describes the problem analysis phase of a school-based action research project which deals with twin issues of assisting a school with the development of processes for school self-review whilst undertaking review of the Senior Management Team as a pilot exercise. The methods trialled for review of the team draw on the findings of a baseline study of team practices in New Zealand schools, the theory base on school self-review, and service quality survey methodology employing focus group discussion and performance gap analysis adapted for use in educational settings. Findings are discussed broadly in relation to the trial of an appropriate methodology for school self-review. They are also discussed specifically in relation to self-discovery for the team and its future development. Conclusions drawn from the project have implications for the team itself in relation to shaping an intervention and for future self-review practices at this school which might inform practice in other schools.

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  • The development of a peer marking system for group assignments

    Comins, Neil; Fitzgibbon, Peter; Boersen, Raewyn (1998-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Group assignments and the fair allocation of assessment marks has led to the development of this easy to administer system. The system involves two forms that have to be completed by the students as a part of their assignment. One of them is a summary of tasks-by-student which is completed by the group as a whole, and the other is a measure of peer participation which is completed confidentially by individual group members. These forms are non-threatening and feedback from students in the use of these forms has generally been positive. The hard workers get to have their work recognised, while those who contribute little are rewarded accordingly. Processing of the forms to achieve the required variation of individual marks can be done either manually or via a spreadsheet. An example of the spreadsheet method has been used in this paper. (An explanation of the manual process is available on request.) This system is considered to be suitable for any degree course after the first semester, after some group learning theory has been taught. It also requires that the students are familiar with the assessment environment. Although the process attempts to quantify a student's contribution to the whole task of creating an assignment, the objective must always be to assess what learning has taken place. A student may not have directly created any of the assessment submission, and yet can be deemed to know the content because of their involvement.

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  • Motivating motivation

    Mitchell, Helen; Thompson, Brian; Beaver, Bob (1997-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

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  • Staff development needs on an international campus

    Baker, Wendy; Panko, Mary (1998-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Over the last decade academic staff at tertiary institutions have been confronted by increasing internationalisation of their classes. In an attempt to support staff development in this area a collaborative research project was undertaken by a combination of interviews and observations to investigate the issues and strategies adopted by staff to improve the learning of Non English Speaking Background (NESB) students. In the study lecturers identified the overwhelming problem when teaching NESB students as language difficulties which they attempted to address by altering their oral delivery patterns but not supporting this with other 'good practice' strategies. Other issues raised were: cultural factors such as limited participation in group work by NESB students, and that NESB students 'unpreparedness' for Student-Centred Learning. Few lecturers were observed to attend to these issues. The study also revealed problems and attitudes changed according to who was the minority - in some classes first language English-speaking New Zealand students formed the minority group while in others it was NESB students. Without exception lecturers valued the presence of NESB students but felt that institutions that encourage large numbers of NESB students should become more accountable for lecturer difficulties and frustrations. The research paper concludes by the advocacy of 'best practice' which will go a long way to overcoming difficulties with NESB students for both lecturers and institutions.

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  • Developments in bridging education for Maori

    Trewartha, Rae (1998-10)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Maori mainstream education is at crisis point; a situation reflected in recent figures showing that 35 per cent of Maori leave school without formal qualifications. The presenter, who works in the area of bridging education for under-qualified students wanting to move into tertiary study, believes Maori bridging programmes have a vital role to play in helping to solve this crisis. In examining current bridging education pedagogy and relating it to pedagogical theory and practice, it is concluded that mainstream bridging programmes do not cater for Maori needs and the development of initiatives intended to bridge this gap are discussed.

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  • Entrepreneurial pathways into New Zealand Diploma in Business

    Malcolm, Pam; Cruickshank, Prue (1999)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the effectiveness of two different pathways into the New Zealand Diploma in Business (NZDipBus) that have been offered at UNITEC for a number of years. This longitudinal study examines the effectiveness of these options not only for the individuals concerned but also as a market response. One pathway is offered to students who do not have the requisite English language skills, and the other to students who do not have a sufficient academic grounding for the mainstream NZDipBus programme. We will also consider how the market has shifted over five years and how it can be responded to. Factors such as immigration and course fees (government subsidies) will be considered.

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  • Interaction on the edge

    Cruickshank, Prue; McLarin, Allan; Brown, Hadley (1999-12)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper examines the richness of an applied communication group project which incorporates writing skills, interpersonal skills, team dynamics, problem solving, decision making, time and stress management, interviewing and both individual and group presentation skills. In addition students were asked to maintain learning diaries for reflective learning and also to carry out peer assessment at the end of the process. This project was developed in response to the professional competencies required by accountants identified in research undertaken for the Institute of Chartered Accountants of New Zealand. The project is also intended to develop emotional intelligence. The workplace project is undertaken by a team of four students from diverse backgrounds and requires them to negotiate with an employer to carry out the project in an organisation. The project is in its second semester, and is still a little on the edge for students in the early stages of their tertiary education.

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